Sports Wrap: What made Philip Hughes’ family angry and more

first_imgPhillip Hughes’ angry family walks out on final day of inquestThe inquest before New South Wales coroner Michael Barnes heard its final submissions on Friday after an emotion-charged week that exposed a rift between the Hughes family and Australia’s cricket establishment.Eoin Morgan to ‘definitely’ captain England for India series Eoin Morgan pulled out of the Bangladesh tour as Jos Buttler stood in as skipper in for the 2-1 series win against a Bangladesh side that had won their six previous ODI series at home.FIFA to decide in January on expanded World Cup, says InfantinoThe 2026 World Cup – which many expect to be hosted across North America – could also be run centrally by FIFA from Zurich instead of by the hosts’ own local organizing committee.ISL 2016: Chennaiyin FC beat FC Goa 2-0 The victory helped the hosts accumulate four points from three matches and leapfrog mid-table while FC Goa are placed at the bottom of the pool without any point from three matches.Chelsea agree long-term kit deal with NikeWithout giving financial details, Chelsea said it represented the largest commercial deal in the Premier League club’s history.last_img read more

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UK Employees Losing A Quarter of Their Annual Leave; Glassdoor UK Annual Leave Survey (201…

first_imgThe average UK employee only uses 77% of his or her annual leave per year, while 44% of employees say that they undertake some work while on holiday. Employees in Wales used the most annual leave (86%) and those in Scotland the least (66%). These are the findings of the Glassdoor UK Annual Leave Survey, which offers insight into how employees’ time off is becoming increasingly squeezed by their job duties and responsibilities.With average annual leave in the UK at approximately 28 days per year, this means that employees could be losing 6.5 days every 12 months. We found that only half (50%) of UK employees take their full annual leave allowance, dropping to just 36% in the North East and 39% in Scotland. The survey also uncovered evidence of using annual leave to look for another job – in fact, 9% of employees that took time off said that they had used holiday days to interview for a new job. This rises to almost one in five (15%) for employees in London.In addition, more than 2 in 5 (44%) employees who took annual leave admit to doing some work while on holiday. This is as high as 57% for Scottish employees and 51% for employees from London, and as low as 25% for employees from Wales. Almost one in five employees who took annual leave in the past year (19%) said that they had a difficult time not thinking about work while they were off. This is highest among employees in London (27%). When it comes to age differences, employees 25-34 years old find it most difficult not thinking about work while on leave (25%) compared to employees in other age groups.Eighteen percent of employees who took paid time off in the past year said that a colleague has contacted them about a work-related matter, and 13% said that their boss contacted them about work.The survey also explored why employees might do some work while they were on leave. 11% of employees said that they feared getting behind on their work, 10% said that they wanted a pay rise, 6% said that they fear not meeting their goals and 6% said that they fear losing their job.Do you take your full annual leave? Do you have a hard time switching off from work when you are out of the office? Are you expected to respond to work email and calls when on holiday from your employer? Help others know what it’s like to work at your company by sharing a review.This survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of Glassdoor among more than 2,000 employees within Great Britain.last_img read more

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5 Ways To Prepare For Your Vacation

first_imgWith summer underway, it’s time to reconsider ignoring that vacation time that you think you don’t need. According to the Glassdoor Employment Confidence Survey (Q1 14), the average U.S. employee only takes half (51%) of his or her eligible vacation time. Some are able to cash in their time off and work through the year, grasping on to their weekends and national holidays for opportunities to relax. However, not all employers provide this option and employees who are offered time off are missing out on the entirety of their compensation.What happens if you don’t take time off? Your overall job performance decreases, you become emotionally shaky and your physical state may worsen. Employers determine the amount of days that their employees should spend away from the office for a purpose. They want you to recharge and stay motivated.Now that you know why taking advantage of your vacation time is crucial, let’s talk about five ways to make sure you actually take the time off you deserve:1. Plan aheadThis is a situation where the early bird gets the worm, or preferred vacation time in this case. As soon as you are hired or begin a new year, sit down with your boss to discuss your vacation plans for the foreseeable future. These plans can include anything from a quick trip to visit mom to a special occasion such as a wedding or anniversary. Not only will your boss and peers appreciate the preplanning, but the sooner you notify your team, the better chance of having your request approved. Remember that you can always cancel, but you can’t add extra days at the last minute.2. Be willing to negotiateIn life we learn that nothing ever turns out the way we want it, and securing vacation time is no exception. You might be the only person in the office over the week of the Fourth of July and might have to take time off during a different week. Perhaps your boss won’t be in town while you wish to take your vacation and you have to step in for him. There are endless scenarios that you may have to be considerate and flexible. While this might act as an inconvenience in the short term, your boss and peers will remember your willingness to work with their schedules and may cut you some slack when you least expect it.3. Put your business hat on before askingYou can win points with your boss and others by being considerate and sensitive to the business cycle.  If you are in finance, it’s not a smart idea to take your vacation during the close of a financial quarter or the annual year.  Similarly, there are times for every company, function and job when it would be silly to be out of the office.  Know what those “blackout” times are and don’t try and run against this grain.  It will be fruitless and will likely make you seem brash to your peers.4. Be ready to talk about how your work will be doneWhile it might be hard to predict what work will need to get done (projects, deadlines, etc.) months or a year ahead, you can speak of how you are thinking you will get ready, who will cover for you and what your role will be while you are away. While vacations should allow your mind and body to actually “vacate” your work and office, it’s naïve to think that every person during every vacation will be able to truly tune out completely. Though not ideal, if your boss and peers need to have every confidence that you will be available while on your days off, so be it. But here are “5 Ways To Be On Vacation When You’re Actually On Vacation” for more ideas about how to maximize your vacations.5. Win supportGetting away on vacation doesn’t simply mean that your boss said you could leave. Sometimes your peers and subordinates have way more influence on your plans than you think. Do you feel like the reason you can’t leave the office is because you have a team that is highly dependent on your presence for success? According to the Glassdoor Employment Confidence Survey, 33% of employees feel like no one else can do their jobs like they can. Plan ahead for what needs to be done while you are away and who will be in charge of delegated tasks. Knowing that they have been left with a specified set of goals will ease their minds and be supportive of your RV trip to the Grand Canyon. Remember that many people have done your job before you, and that many will follow. Train your colleagues to be independent and team savvy.It’s time to use the vacation that you have earned. With a little more planning and readiness, the only reason that you don’t use your vacation, will be because you choose not to do so.last_img read more

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How to Network with the Right Recruiter

first_imgIf you are out of work or, simply open to new opportunities, and you meet a recruiter: DO NOT start pitching your resume to them. Why? You might be wasting each other’s time! Just because someone is a recruiter doesn’t mean they are in a position to help you. For example, back in the day I used to work for Lanta Technology Group where we staffed startups with executive and technical talent. I was always on the hunt for software developers and senior managers who wanted to join a startup and get rich overnight. During the dot com era, it was not considered too outlandish to accomplish that very thing. When I would attend networking functions, business cards and resumes were tossed at me like ninja stars.So many times I wanted to scream out loud (and I think I did once) that I could not help everyone. And more often than not, I had to refer people to other recruiters I knew. Why? The job title of “recruiter” is not a one-size fits all kind of position. There are many different types of recruiters: military recruiters, diversity recruiters, technical recruiters, healthcare recruiters, college recruiters, sports recruiters, executive recruiters, physician recruiters, nurse recruiters, bilingual recruiters, sales recruiters, firefighter recruiters, truck driver recruiters, veterinarian recruiters, legal recruiters, management recruiters, and pharmaceutical recruiters. And this is just off the top of my head. In case you think I am exaggerating, take any of these recruiter job titles and look them up on a job board. Sigh…On some occasions, I think I offended some people by referring them elsewhere. But honestly, back then I served a specific niche. If you were a schoolteacher or a CPA, I would not have been able to help you. I wish back then I would have pointed people to Google Plus.Google Plus is going through something of an identity crisis, but for now, I liken it to a Facebook competitor. One of the things I really like about Google Plus is how easy it is to find people on it. (Go figure). Check out what happens when I do a search for “technical recruiter” on Google Plus and refine my search by “People and Pages.”I get rows and rows of pictures of people on Google Plus who are college recruiters, or at the least, have those terms on their Google Plus “About Me” pages. Moreover, if we have mutual friends in common, I am able to see that at a glance. And the best part, if they have the Google Hangout symbol on their profile, I can reach out to them and say “hello.”Of course, if I were to reach out to a perfect stranger on Google Plus, I would make very sure that my Google Plus profile is looking good and does a great job at showcasing my professional achievements. Why? It’s the first place someone will look and it is what they will use to determine whether or not they will reply to your hangout request. Make sense?last_img read more

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10 Acting Tips To Help You Give Better Presentations

first_imgActors can teach you a lot about making presentations. Whether you have to present during an interview or as a regular part of your job, the techniques used by movie and TV stars can help you perform more effectively. Here’s ten techniques gleaned from actors and the coaches who train them, to help you overcome your nerves and deliver better presentations.1. Good presentations require great preparation, but do not start by writing your presentation out like an essay. Caroline Goyder, a former acting coach at the Central School of Speech and Drama who helps business leaders to communicate effectively says, “Writing it down tempts you to just read it out, which gives a dead, impersonal delivery.”2. When thinking about what you want to say, turn your attention away from yourself and to your audience. What problem do they want you to help them solve? Then consider how you overcame that problem yourself and describe how you did it. This results in a more personalised presentation and builds a link between you and the audience.3. Note the points you want to make on sticky notes, in the form of pictures if you like. “Many actors use this trick to learn scripts as the brain remembers pictures for longer than words,” says Goyder. It leads to a more fluid and personal delivery than reading out a pre-written script, and you can easily swap the notes around to try out different structures for your presentation.4. Know all the points in your presentation inside out, but feel free to improvise when it comes to making them. This keeps your delivery fresh, however many times you have made the same presentation. Ed Brodow, a former actor who is now a professional speaker and negotiator, says improvisation led to one of his signature stories, about how he knocked his grandfather’s false teeth down the toilet. “It succeeds in getting the point across with warmth and humour,” says Brodow.5. Practise. Deliver your presentation into an audio or video recorder so you get used to what you sound and look like to an audience. Then deliver it to a live audience of colleagues, friends or family. Ask for constructive feedback.6. Make like Anthony Hopkins . Use what actors call personalisation. When Hopkins was playing serial killer Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs, he helped convey the inner anger of Lecter by reaching into his own experience of being so angry that he felt like killing someone. You can use this technique of tapping into your own emotional experiences to bring the impact of emotions such as joy, surprise or fear into your presentations.7. Find a visual way to back up your points, but try to be original rather than just using Powerpoint with words and graphs. Ed Brodow once beat up a rubber chicken as part of a presentation. It’s off the wall, but people remembered it.8. When it comes to delivery, take it slowly. Goyder cites a technique used by actor Ewan McGregor:  deliver one thought at a time. Putting pauses between each thought helps you slow down. This is useful as nerves tend to speed up speech. Imagine you are delivering each point to one member of the audience and wait until you can see from their face that they have got it. This is a technique used by stand-up comedians.9. Take a tip from George Clooney, and think of the audience as close friends. “It makes you warm up and smile,” says Goyder.10. Finally, there is one tip you can try out right now. Many television and radio professionals use this technique to ensure that they come across as twinkling, charming and friendly. Think to yourself, “I’m beautiful; someone loves me; I have a secret.” Keeping that in mind, say what you have to say.  Try it now with the next person you speak to. It really works.last_img read more

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How I Got My Job: Glassdoor’s Android App

first_imgHas Glassdoor helped you? We love hearing from our community on how they found a job, negotiated a salary or learned more about the interview process at a company! Plus, when you tell your story, you help countless others. Tell us your story by emailing us at blog@glassdoor.com. Glassdoor is excited to announce we’ve brought our popular Job Feed feature to Android. Because of this, today’s How I Got My Job post is special, featuring Glassdoor members who have found their jobs using Glassdoor’s Android app. The ability to search and find jobs on your mobile device is increasingly important: nine in 10 job seekers plan to use their mobile device to look for a job in the next 12 months (according to Glassdoor’s Mobile Job Search Survey). So, we’re thrilled so many of you have found jobs so far using the Android app, and we hope Job Feed makes it even better.Job Feed makes it easier and more efficient to find the most relevant and latest jobs. It allows job seekers to search just once for the types of jobs they are interested in, and then, every time they visit the app, they will find a stream of jobs relevant to their job search preferences including job title and location. Learn more about Job Feed and download it today from Google Play.Congrats to these and all of the Glassdoor members who have already found a job they love using our Android app!last_img read more

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Top Oddball Interview Questions for 2015

first_img“Can you calculate how many tennis balls are used during the course of Wimbledon?” – Accenture Analyst job candidate (London, England). More Accenture interview questions. Now that Glassdoor has identified the Best Jobs in America and the Best Jobs in the UK for 2015, we’re excited to unveil some of the toughest and most bizarre questions job seekers could face when interviewing for these top jobs or any job this year.The message – be ready for any question during today’s challenging interview process for any job.New This Year: Challenging and unexpected questions are being asked in job interviews all over the world. No matter where your interview is, Glassdoor wants to help, so we’re revealing some of the toughest questions job candidates are being asked in the U.S., along with the UK, Canada, France and Germany.Here’s just a sample of some of the toughest interview questions being asked around the world:“What would you do if you were the one survivor in a plane crash?” – Airbnb Trust and Safety Investigator job candidate (Portland, OR). More Airbnb interview questions. “If you could high five one person, living or not, who would it be?” – Lululemon Retail Educator job candidate (Toronto, ON). More Lululemon interview questions.See all five Glassdoor lists of the Top 10 Oddball Interview Questions for 2015 by country:United StatesUnited KingdomCanadaFranceGermanyJob candidates should be ready to take on any question during an interview, so Glassdoor has also compiled a list of some of the Most Common Interview Questions.Have you been asked an odd or challenging interview question? Share the interview question with others.last_img read more

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6 Steps To Find Your Voice In The Workplace

first_imgThere’s good news and bad news in the workplace of 2015. The good news is that there has never been a better time to be a work professional than right now. The bad news is that there is still entirely too much suffering in silence going on. Too much leading by intimidation and too much fear caused by bullying.The fix? Speaking Up. Silence is the enemy.In my work as a trainer all over the world, I see that the number one challenge staff face is to find their voices to speak up to their managers and colleagues. A close second (in challenges, that is) is that too many undervalue their worth. They say, “I can’t speak up. I’m afraid of losing my job.” I say, “If you keep staying silent, I’m afraid you are going to lose you.”Here’s the thing. If you speak your mind respectfully, directly, and with specific details, you not only will not lose your job, you will mostly likely be setting the stage for a promotion, not to mention improved self-confidence, self-esteem, self-respect and the respect of others.What are we staying quiet about? Lots of things…Voicing a concern about a difficult manager or co-workerSaying what we need to do our work betterExpressing a differing opinionNegotiating salary during the interview process (Only 5% of women will negotiate)Asking for a raise and/or promotionConfronting a bullyReporting the toxic behaviors of bulliesDiscussing a brewing problemTalking about the need for trainingJustifying a promotionAsking for time offTrue Story“I’m so sorry. I had no idea.” Angela’s executive of three years was moody and often abusive. He yelled, used profanity, and publicly humiliated Angela and other staff. He ruled with fear and intimation and most everyone was frightened to say a word. The stress level was off the charts because it was getting worse.One day the executive pushed Angela too far and she snapped. She followed him into his office and closed the door. She told him that he was chasing good people away in droves and that the disrespect was intolerable. She told him specifically what he said and did that was offensive and that it needed to stop “right now.” Angela turned around, left the room, and went back to her desk. She was shaking but had zero regrets.In a few minutes her boss came out of his office with tears in his eyes and said, “I am so sorry. You are absolutely right. I had no idea my behavior was so bad. It won’t happen again.” It didn’t. The executive apologized to the rest of the team. The kicker? Angela has now been with her executive for 26 years.We have heard stories similar to Angela’s many times. Some assistants find it difficult to believe that a bully can be unaware but it is true. Standing up and speaking out directly and in detail is a strategy that is effective and reduces tremendous angst in the office.How Do You Speak Up? Here’s the 6-Step Plan.Practice saying the words out loud. The more you say them out loud, the easier it will be to say them. Many people will say that they don’t speak up because they will cry. Practicing saying the words will minimize the chance of crying. The main problem with tears is that they diminish your message.Pick your “battle” and choose your moment. Ask for time alone with the person. No public humiliation. What you need to say is between the two of you. There is great power in speaking to the elephants in the room by asking the questions, “Can we talk?” or “I can see something is bothering you. What can I do to help?”Stay calm, clear, and direct. Be specific and factual in your examples. Say, “It made me feel X when Y happened yesterday and Z happened last week.”Allow the other person to save face. Say, “I know that you might not know how this impacted me so I felt it was important for me to tell you.” Speak only for yourself and not for others.Prepare something in writing to clarify what you are saying. Putting these ideas on paper communicates the seriousness of the issues.Stop Talking. Once you speak your mind, be quiet and wait. Tolerate the awkward silence until the response comes. Even if the person does not come around all the way, your relationship is forever changed. You are now known as a person who will not stay quiet when there is a problem and that is a very good thing.Awesome things happen when you find your voice to speak up about the things that matter. Most of all, you matter. I am rooting you on.last_img read more

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Employee Spotlight: Calvin Park, Senior Android Engineer

first_imgHere at Glassdoor, we’ve dedicated ourselves to helping people find the jobs and companies they love. Having revolutionized workplace transparency, now it’s our turn to offer an inside look into the culture and community that make up Glassdoor. Learn more, firsthand, from the people who have found a home here. This week, Calvin Park, a Senior Android Engineer with our Mobile team shared his transition from aerospace engineering to the mobile space. Find out how he translates his experience building drones into helping Glassdoor create a more user-friendly career network for our 30 million members.1. What is your position here at Glassdoor and what do you do?I’m a Senior Android Engineer, so basically my entire job circles around working on Glassdoor’s Android application. I work with the Mobile team to come up with new features, and with designers to pick out which features are the best and collaborate on different screens and animations. And since I’m an engineer, I do a lot of coding, coming up with whatever features we decided on to make them look and work the best on the app. We also have an intern at the moment, so another part of my job is to give him mentorship here and there, as well as guide him in learning new processes.2. What did you do before you began working at Glassdoor?Before I got into the mobile space, I went to school for aerospace degrees, and then I was mainly working on drones. We actually built UAVs to be like remote airplanes, and then put brains on them. This was all in 2009 and 2010 before drones got really big. At the time, I was also doing research on how to make drones collaborate with each other to make network chains. I first got into the mobile space after I made my first Android app, which was the UI for a drone controlling system. After that, I started doing more research on building Android apps, and realized it’s a very fast-evolving space. It’s always changing, always challenging, and you always have to be on top of your game. There isn’t a final goal you hit where you reach the highest level of Android engineer—you’re always learning more. So I came out here to interview, and when I met the people I was going to work with I knew Glassdoor was right for me.3. Why be an Android engineer at Glassdoor?I think what I mainly look for in a company is the people I’ll be working with, and the culture here is amazing. For example, we have been really heads down lately working longer hours than usual. I don’t think it’s possible to do that in a place where you don’t enjoy the people you’re working with. It’s just the fact that we have so much fun when we’re working that it doesn’t feel too much like work anyway.4. Whether it’s working with dogs, catered lunch, or a keg in the office, what’s your favorite Glassdoor perk?I think my favorite perk is having open vacation. I like that it’s not tied to a certain date, and is based more on if you’re doing your work, then you can take time off when you need it. When I first got hired here, my sister had her wedding, so I had just started three weeks before and already needed to take time off. During the offer process, both my manager and the CTO were really understanding of the initial vacation for the wedding, which I really appreciated. Glassdoor was really flexible, and it really eased the stress of taking a new job across the country.5. What advice would you give others looking to pursue a career in engineering at Glassdoor?When you come in for your interview, ask as much about the flow of work and everyday tasks as possible. It’s also really important to find out as much as you can about the people you’ll be working with, because on those days with long hours and all the activities we do together outside of work, you have to like your team. The engineers on my team have become good friends, and I really enjoy hanging out with them after work sometimes. We do weekly volleyball sessions, and we also do volunteer activities together, like recently we did a Big Brothers Big Sisters walk. Finding that fun-ness in work I think is important.6. What is your favorite food served at the Glassdoor café?So far? I love the fruit—watermelon is awesome. It’s something I don’t usually buy at home, so all the people that know me see me taking big batches of watermelon at a time.7. What do you like to do when you’re not working?Outside of work, I like longboarding. I live in San Francisco, so I like to longboard around Golden Gate Park and around the Marina area. And on the weekends, I like going out with friends to bars and clubs in the city. I also picked up tennis when I came out here, so I do that sometimes. It’s a really good balance here between the big city and the nature in Marin. I can just escape the city and go on a four hour hike whenever I want.8. What do you like about working with the Glassdoor Mobile team that you didn’t have at past companies?Not micromanaging each other. We respect each other’s skills here. When somebody is assigned a task, we know for sure it’s going to be good when they finish, and that it’ll work. We have confidence in each other. Whoever joins our team next, those are the kinds of skills we’re looking for, so we know that they’re going to be able to do do the work we give them, and they’re going to do it right.9. Are there any challenging features you’ve worked on that you’re extra proud of?The one we’re working on right now, the new material release. Google just came up with a new design paradigm called material design. We’re going through our app and finding all new designs for all different places. It takes a lot of work to get out every detail and collaborate with designers and other engineers to fix design errors.Interested in working with Calvin? Sign up here to find out more about becoming part of the Glassdoor family!last_img read more

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The Five Highest Rated Women CEOs on Glassdoor

first_imgToday, Glassdoor announced the 50 Highest Rated CEOs of 2015 in five categories and one major point caught us by surprise when reviewing the winners—the lack of women. In this blog post, we decided to dig in to the category that honors CEOs whose companies have at least 1,000 employees or more in the U.S. to find out where the women are.We discovered several women nearly made the cut—in fact of the five women featured below, all were just a few percentage points shy from appearing on this annual list. CEOs who did earn the award have between 88% and 97% approval rating based on feedback from U.S. employees over the past year.Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors – 86% approvalMary Barra was named CEO of General Motors on January 15, 2014—since then, she’s gained the support of her workforce earning high ratings on Glassdoor. Among U.S.-based employees over the past year, Barra has garnered an 86% approval rating, and the company is rated 3.5 out of 5 stars overall on Glassdoor.Here’s what a few employees had to say about how Barra is leading the company:“New CEO seems to be doing her best to build the company and regain customer’s trust by changing the culture.” – General Motors Group Leader (Lansing, MI) “There is a real top management commitment to develop great products, provide a good working environment for employees, act with transparency and contribute to the communities where they operate.” – General Motors Employee (location n/a)“CEO is doing a great job.” – General Motors Employee (Austin, TX)Pamela M. (Pam) Nicholson, CEO of Enterprise Rent-A-Car – 84% approvalWhen she was appointed CEO of Enterprise Rent-A-Car in June of 2013, Pam Nicholson became the highest-ranking woman, not only at Enterprise Holdings, but also in the entire $20-billion U.S. car rental industry. On Glassdoor, Nicholson garners an 84% approval rating among U.S. based employees over the past year, who rated Enterprise as 3.2 out of 5 stars during the same time period.Enterprise Rent-A-Car employees have had this to say about Nicholson and the senior leadership team:“Upper management in St. Louis is amazing and strives to succeed and help out every level of employee.” – Enterprise Rent-A-Car Senior Accountant (St. Louis, MO)“I love the people I work with! It’s not intimidating at all to reach out to upper management and there’s so much support from them!” – Enterprise Rent-A-Car Assistant Manager (location n/a)“I enjoy that I have met all the upper management in my region and we constantly have company get togethers that get us on first name basis.” – Enterprise Rent-A-Car Management Trainee (location n/a)Kay Krill, CEO of Ann Taylor – 84% approval               As CEO of Ann Taylor, Kay Krill also receives consistent thumbs up from her employees as those based in the U.S. have given her an 84% approval rating over the past year, and rated the company 3.4 stars out of 5. They not only praise her, but also the management team she’s cultivated.Ann Taylor employees noted:“Upper management truly makes you feel inspired and eager to come to work every day.” – Ann Taylor Store Manager (New York, NY) “Most upper management are very supportive of this merchant mindset as long as you have a business case for what you’re doing.” – Ann Taylor LOFT Store Manager (Chicago, IL)“Management has been very entrepreneurial and encouraging.” – Ann Taylor Sales Lead (location n/a)Marillyn Hewson, CEO of Lockheed Martin – 83% approval         After spending 30 years of her career at Lockheed Martin, Marillyn Hewson became the CEO in 2013 and has since inspired the company’s 112,000+ employees worldwide. Employees give Hewson an 83% approval rating and rate the company 3.5 out of 5 stars. Beyond these high marks, employees also have high praise for the entire executive team.Lockheed Martin employees write:“Executive leadership is very communicative, efficient, respected and respectful; worth following and learning from.” – Lockheed Martin Employee (Marietta, GA)“Upper management always interested in employee feedback, new ideas and works to implement the best of those into operations. Everything extra you give is valued.” – Lockheed Martin Senior Engineer (Rockville, MD)“Young females and female minorities are given every opportunity and second chances to excel at Lockheed Martin.” – Lockheed Martin Employee (Denver, CO) Sharen Turney, CEO of Victoria’s Secret Stores – 83% approvalFrom small town farm roots in Oklahoma to her current role as CEO of the international brand Victoria’s Secret Stores, Sharen Turney earned an 83% approval rating among U.S.-based employees over the past year. Her employees also rate the company above average on Glassdoor, giving it 3.3 out of 5 stars for the same time period.Victoria Secret employees share:“Really great leadership from executives in the company.” – Victoria’s Secret Product Manager (San Francisco, CA)“Keep doing what you’re doing! I love the company and the mission. VS is continually progressing and increasing it’s market share.” – Victoria’s Secret Sales Associate (Houston, TX)“Senior leadership gives clear, concise and relevant direction. Leadership in this company has so much drive and passion.” – Victoria’s Secret Store Manager (location n/a)Do you think your CEO should be honored as one of the best? Share a company review on Glassdoor, and provide feedback on how you think your CEO is doing in terms of leading the company and put them in the running for next year’s awards.last_img read more

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Glassdoor’s Candidates’ Choice Awards 2015: Winners Announced

first_imgWhen it comes to the job interview process, some employers offer an amazing experience that can make you want to join the company on the spot. However, some companies offer an interview experience that may make you want to start your job search all over again.So which companies are getting the candidate experience right? Today, Glassdoor reveals the winners of its inaugural Candidates’ Choice Awards, recognizing employers with the best interview experience, according to those who know best – the job candidates. Specifically, we’re recognizing employers across nearly 50 industries with the highest percentage of job candidates who have reported a positive interview experience over the past year.According to feedback shared by job candidates on Glassdoor, winning employers tend to provide a transparent, efficient and organized interview process, while communicating with candidates throughout.Here are the Glassdoor Candidates’ Choice Awards winners by industry:Accounting: PwC75% positive interview experience11% neutral interview experience7% negative interview experienceAerospace & Defense: Lockheed Martin73% positive interview experience17% neutral interview experience7% negative interview experienceAirlines: United Airlines73% positive interview experience17% neutral interview experience9% negative interview experienceBanks & Credit Unions: U.S. Bank72% positive interview experience12% neutral interview experience13% negative interview experienceBeauty & Personal Accessories Stores: Bath & Body Works73% positive interview experience16% neutral interview experience10% negative interview experienceBiotech & Pharmaceuticals: Johnson & Johnson69% positive interview experience16% neutral interview experience11% negative interview experienceBuilding & Personnel Services: Cintas55% positive interview experience22% neutral interview experience20% negative interview experienceCable, Internet & Telephone Providers: Time Warner Cable65% positive interview experience14% neutral interview experience17% negative interview experienceCar Rental: Hertz63% positive interview experience21% neutral interview experience15% negative interview experienceCasual Restaurants: Red Lobster72% positive interview experience14% neutral interview experience12% negative interview experienceComputer Hardware & Software: Intel Corporation71% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience8% negative interview experienceConsulting: Booz Allen Hamilton69% positive interview experience10% neutral interview experience18% negative interview experienceConsumer Electronics & Appliances Stores: Best Buy67% positive interview experience17% neutral interview experience14% negative interview experienceConsumer Products Manufacturing: NIKE73% positive interview experience14% neutral interview experience9% negative interview experienceDepartment, Clothing, & Shoe Stores: American Eagle Outfitters78% positive interview experience9% neutral interview experience8% negative interview experienceDrug & Health Stores: Walgreens65% positive interview experience19% neutral interview experience14% negative interview experienceEnergy: SolarCity63% positive interview experience14% neutral interview experience22% negative interview experienceEnterprise Software & Network Solutions: Oracle61% positive interview experience20% neutral interview experience16% negative interview experienceFast-Food & Quick-Service Restaurants: Starbucks76% positive interview experience13% neutral interview experience9% negative interview experienceFederal Agencies: US Postal Service70% positive interview experience17% neutral interview experience8% negative interview experienceFinancial Transaction Processing: American Express59% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience21% negative interview experienceFood & Beverage Manufacturing: Coca-Cola Company67% positive interview experience13% neutral interview experience18% negative interview experienceFood & Beverage Stores: Trader Joe’s63% positive interview experience22% neutral interview experience12% negative interview experienceGeneral Merchandise & Superstores: Kmart68% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience15% negative interview experienceGrocery Stores & Supermarkets: Publix79% positive interview experience13% neutral interview experience6% negative interview experienceHealth Care Services & Hospitals: CVS Health60% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience22% negative interview experienceHome Centers & Hardware Stores: The Home Depot68% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience14% negative interview experienceHotels, Motels, & Resorts: Marriott69% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience14% negative interview experienceInsurance Carriers: State Farm68% positive interview experience14% neutral interview experience13% negative interview experienceInternet: eBay64% positive interview experience19% neutral interview experience15% negative interview experienceInvestment Banking & Asset Management: Fidelity Investments71% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience10% negative interview experienceIT Services: Dell64% positive interview experience16% neutral interview experience17% negative interview experienceLending: Quicken Loans54% positive interview experience21% neutral interview experience20% negative interview experienceLogistics & Supply Chain: UPS70% positive interview experience12% neutral interview experience14% negative interview experienceMovie Theaters: AMC Entertainment69% positive interview experience19% neutral interview experience9% negative interview experienceMuseums, Zoos & Amusement Parks: Six Flags75% positive interview experience8% neutral interview experience14% negative interview experienceOffice Supply Stores: Staples61% positive interview experience14% neutral interview experience19% negative interview experienceOil & Gas Services: Schlumberger69% positive interview experience13% neutral interview experience7% negative interview experiencePet & Pet Supplies Stores: PetSmart68% positive interview experience14% neutral interview experience13% negative interview experienceResearch & Development: Nielsen63% positive interview experience16% neutral interview experience16% negative interview experienceSocial Assistance: YMCA68% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience15% negative interview experienceSporting Goods Stores: Dick’s Sporting Goods63% positive interview experience12% neutral interview experience23% negative interview experienceStaffing & Outsourcing: Insight Global63% positive interview experience15% neutral interview experience19% negative interview experienceTelecommunications Services: AT&T63% positive interview experience19% neutral interview experience16% negative interview experienceToy & Hobby Stores: Toys “R” Us78% positive interview experience9% neutral interview experience8% negative interview experienceTransportation Equipment Manufacturing: Cummins66% positive interview experience20% neutral interview experience7% negative interview experienceHow do other companies compare? Check out all companies that met the methodology.Job Candidates: Have something to say about a recent interview experience? Share an interview review on Glassdoor.Employers: Want to manage your profile on Glassdoor and engage in the conversation? Unlock your Free Employer Account.MethodologyThe Glassdoor Candidates’ Choice Awards recognizes employers across dozens of industries with the highest percentage of job candidates who have reported a positive interview experience over the past year. To be considered, a company must receive at least 100 interview experience ratings, shared by job candidates on Glassdoor, over the past year (8/28/14-8/27/15). In cases where companies have the same positive interview experience percentage, the company with the higher neutral interview experience receives the higher rank. In cases where companies also have the same neutral interview experience, the company with more interview reviews receives the higher rank. A company’s positive interview experience percentage must also meet or exceed that of the average company on Glassdoor (54% average positive interview experience, based on more than 400,000 companies featured on Glassdoor). On Glassdoor, industries represent sub-categories within sectors. Companies are categorized into their respective industries as they appear on Glassdoor. In cases in which a company has no industry affiliation on Glassdoor or its industry affiliation does not reflect its business, the Glassdoor review panel reserves the right to categorize or re-categorize a company based on external references.last_img read more

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The Ultimate Holiday Gift Guide for the Office

first_img‘Tis the season to go shopping — for holiday gifts, that is. The holiday season is fast-approaching, and now is the time to begin making your list (and checking it twice). But, what should be a time of joy and celebration is often masked by stress and frustration, especially when it comes to the office gift exchange.Should you give all of your team members a present? What about your boss, for that matter? What is an acceptable amount to spend on a gift for a coworker? What is an appropriate gift for your boss?No one wants to be on either side of a gift-giving failure, especially at the office. To help you navigate the ins and outs of the workplace gift exchange — and avoid being know as the office Scrooge — here are a few things to consider (and give) to your colleagues:Your BossDeciding whether or not to give your boss a gift this holiday season is a common dilemma faced by a majority of employees. On the one hand, you don’t want to appear as though you’re trying to gain favoritism. On the other hand, you don’t want to be the only employee who doesn’t give your boss something for the holidays.As it turns out, workers who plan to give their boss a gift are in the minority. According to Spherion’s “WorkSphere” survey, only 34 percent plan on giving gifts to their bosses. Even so, that’s an increase from years prior (27 percent in 2013).The safest way to approach giving gifts to your boss is to make it a group effort. Suggest having everyone pitch in on a gift. This way, there’s no confusing gift-giving for brown-nosing, there’s less stress involved, and no one is left out of the mix.A gift card to their favorite restaurant, website, store, or coffee shopTickets to a local event, concert, or classSubscription boxes (like Graze, Club W or Craft Coffee)Your CubemateWe tend to spend more time at work during the week than we do anywhere else, so it’s only natural for workplace friendships to form. As such, you may be planning to gift your cubemate with something during the holidays.However, 43 percent of the workers surveyed by Spherion don’t plan to buy office gifts because they feel they would have to buy something for everyone and consider that to be “too much.” But don’t let that keep you from showing your work BFF a little love during the holidays — just be sure to give them their gift in private or outside of the workplace to avoid showing favoritism.Office-friendly gifts (like this beverage warmer or mouse pad)A gift card to the lunch spot you frequent togetherA replacement for the fancy pen you borrowed and brokeYour Secret SantaSecret Santa provides a perfect opportunity to give gifts in the workplace without having to stress about who to include or how much to spend. The key is to stick to the rules and the budget. When shopping for the person you randomly picked during the Secret Santa name drawing, look for a gift that is appropriate for the office and tailored to the recipient.Under $15: Starbucks gift cardUnder $30: Festive treats (like hot chocolate and marshmallows)Under $50: Tech accessories (e.g. personalized phone case, portable phone charger, etc.)Your TeamYou’ve managed to find the perfect holiday gift for your boss, work friend, and Secret Santa recipient — but what about everyone else in the office? Giving gifts to everyone you work with is a great way to show your appreciation. Fortunately, those gifts don’t have to cost and arm and leg. Baked goodsHoliday drink mix (Hot spiced tea, anyone?)Food gift basket for the staff loungeWhat are some other things to consider when giving gifts to your co-workers or boss during the holidays?last_img read more

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Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Expect a Gift From Your Coworker

first_imgGift giving and celebrations are the cornerstones of the holiday season, but when it comes to offices around the country, employees are planning to give a little less this year. At least according to a new survey by staffing company Spherion, which found that only 31 percent of employees are planning to spread the joy with gifts for co-workers at their level. That’s down from 38 percent in 2014. Meanwhile 28 percent plan to give their boss a gift this year, down from 34 percent a year ago.“A lot of people would rather spend money on family and friends, the people they feel closer to,” says Sandy Mazur, division president at Spherion. “People work virtually and in small groups. The structure of the workplace has also changed.”Rewind even a decade and working from home was a perk that only a few got to take advantage of. These days lots of employees are logging in from their home offices. According to Global Work Place Analytics, 50% of the U.S. workforce has a job that can be done at least partially away from the office while about 20 percent to 25 percent of the workforce teleworks at some frequency. That amounts to 3.7 million employees who work at home for at least half the time. Among younger workers it’s almost expected when joining an organization.In addition to an unstructured workforce being the reason for the reigning in of holiday gift giving, in many companies around the country the holidays often increase awareness about being inclusive and sensitive to all religions, which could result in hesitancy on the part of employees to give co-workers gifts. “Everyone wants to be politically correct at this time of year to make sure they are not overlooking anybody who may not celebrate in one shape or form,” says Mazur. “There’s a little bit of reluctance to not make anyone feel unwelcome.”Employees Lowering The Amount They Spend On GiftsIn addition to scaling back the number of gifts employees give this year, Spherion found among the people who will be dolling out presents, they plan to spend less than last year. That comes at a time when economists and retail analysts are predicting an increase in the amount consumers spend in general on holiday gifts in November and December. According to the National Retail Federation sales in November and December are forecasted to increase 3 to 7 percent to $630.5 billion, higher than the ten year average of 2.5 percent.Spherion found U.S. workers plan on spending an average of $17 less on gifts for co-workers this year while bosses will get gifts that cost anywhere from $10 to $14 less than a year ago. That can be a testament to the fact that employees want to spend their money on closer families and friends or that many are still struggling with high debt and tight holiday spending budgets. One way to spread holiday cheer and remain inclusive to everyone is to bring in a basket of treats like baked goods, candy or cookies, says Mazur. Everyone in the office can take part in the gift and it won’t offend anyone by leaving them out. Not to mention it can be a low cost way to spread holiday cheer.Employers Getting High Marks For Holiday CheerEmployees may be suffering from a bit of bah humbug this holiday season, but the companies they work for aren’t, according to the Spherion survey. It found that about half of companies are planning to celebrate the holidays in the office this year. Of the respondents, 22 percent of companies plan to bill their celebration as a Christmas party while 19 percent are calling it a Holiday party and the remainder dubbing it a year end celebration. “It’s critically important for employees to feel engaged and appreciated,” she says. “Companies need to do whatever they can to make employees feel engaged and appreciated and most employees feel they are doing that.”last_img read more

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VIDEO: 3 Minute Recap from Glassdoor’s Pay Equality Roundtable Discussion

first_imgThis morning’s roundtable on equal pay marked an open, authentic and heartfelt discussion on ways to close the gender gap, and promote fair pay in public and private sectors. Hundreds of people joined in person and several thousand tuned in to the livestream to hear from our esteemed panel, led by Diane Brady and featuring Hillary Clinton, Robert Hohman, Megan Rapinoe, Tracy Sturdivant, Dan Henkle, and Lori Nishiura Mackenzie. The discussion ranged from the issues behind the inequity in salary to ways companies and the government can help solve the gap.A few of our favorite moments from the conversation:“Perhaps the biggest myth of all is that we can’t solve these problems. Well, I absolutely think that we will. Other countries have made it easier for women to be mothers, to have careers, to be caretakers and have careers. They know it’s foolish to have half of their population out of use. If we want to compete in the global economy, we have to make it possible for everyone to work.” – Hillary Clinton, former U.S. Secretary of State“The world’s not going to get less transparent. This is a trend that is one way. Companies that get in front of this, that embrace this and begin to look at this data, and take action will have a disproportionate advantage when it comes to hiring. No matter who you are or what your job is, we are passionate about you finding a job and company you love and getting paid equally for it.” – Robert Hohman, Glassdoor CEO & co-founder“There is a role for employers to play, but there is also a role for people to play. There is a cultural shift that needs to happen so people can say that it’s ok to have this conversation.” – Tracy Sturdivant, co-founder & co-executive director of Make It Work“I think we as a team have a keen understanding of our platform right now and around the platform of women’s equality, and we love to share that load.” – Megan Rapinoe, World Cup Champion & Olympic Gold Medalist“But you don’t get to pay equality by accident – you really have to be thinking about your promotions, your hiring, your pay decision – you actually have to think about it every step of the way.” – Dan Henkle, president, Gap Foundation & SVP of global sustainability of Gap Inc.There were many great insights shared over the hour – You can catch the replay of the entire event here.Or, check out our 3 minute recap:What are your thoughts about fair pay? Join the conversation #ShareYourPay or share your salary on Glassdoor anonymously.Photo Credit: Mark Von Holden, AP for Glassdoorlast_img read more

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#ShareYourPay: 14 Amazing Twitter Reactions to Glassdoor’s Pay Equality Roundtable

first_imgWe’ve just wrapped up Glassdoor’s Roundtable on Gender Pay Equality featuring Hillary Clinton, Megan Rapinoe and other prominent leaders and experts. Our panelists joined hundreds of people live in New York, and thousands more on LiveStream. If you missed it, don’t worry. You can still watch the replay.Using the hashtag #ShareYourPay, people watching shared their thoughts on Twitter, even Mindy Kaling got into the act. The reactions were inspiring and included cartoons of the event, a CNBC Mad Money poll, selfies and a data sharing infographic comparing men and women’s soccer.Here are some of our favorites.1.Multiple elements at work to create equal pay for all. #ShareYourPay #EqualPayDay #HillaryClinton @HillaryClinton pic.twitter.com/7XShIEj85E— lizadonnelly (@lizadonnelly) April 12, 20162..@Glassdoor says if you #ShareYourPay, it would highlight pay gaps. Would you openly share your pay with others?— Mad Money On CNBC (@MadMoneyOnCNBC) April 12, 20163.BOOM! #EqualPayDay #ShareYourPay https://t.co/YtEgqU7fLS— Danyette (@foulksd) April 12, 20164.Truly enlightening and important conversation today. Well done @glassdoor #shareyourpay @HillaryClinton @bobhohman pic.twitter.com/yiAdMMsskq— Rich Barton (@Rich_Barton) April 12, 20165.Thank you @gdforemployers for this amazing experience! New friends & @hillaryclinton ?? #shareyourpay #ImWithHer pic.twitter.com/KUWaGIrVoa— Alisa Kleiman (@alisakleiman) April 12, 20166.¡Eso! Your voice & your #vote count! Tell Congress we NEED to close #wagegap: https://t.co/t6Vg9G7IJv #ShareYourPay pic.twitter.com/bUV3d06K3Y— Migdalia (@MsLatina) April 12, 20167.#EqualPayDay #ShareYourPay #equalplayequalpay pic.twitter.com/bwJgTME3EH— Meg ⚓️ (@MDubClone) April 12, 20168.”Don’t wait for policy, don’t wait for CEO commitment, take action now.” @Glassdoor #EqualPayDay #ShareYourPay— Valentina Zarya (@valzarya) April 12, 20169.Powerful discussion on equal pay led by @bobhohman’s @Glassdoor with @HilaryClinton #ShareYourPay #EqualPayDay pic.twitter.com/FbKgH7WhXZ— Barney Harford (@barneyh) April 12, 201610.There should be ongoing conversation around performance and opportunities, not just a yearly review! Thanks @bobhohman #ShareYourPay— Pamela Hobbs (@Pam_CareerArc) April 12, 201611.Data is absolutely our best friend when it comes to #EqualPay #ShareYourPay— Molly Enking (@mollydort) April 12, 201612.As kids we were taught not to talk about money. There needs to be a cultural shift #ShareYourPay #EqualPayDay pic.twitter.com/cPVHde3nyT— Stephanie Stark (@Stephanie_Stark) April 12, 201613.”If talking about equal pay is playing the gender card, then deal me in!” – @HillaryClinton #EqualPayDay #ShareYourPay— Prachi Gupta (@prachigu) April 12, 201614.Has everyone seen the chart comparing the salaries of the #USWNT vs men? Woof. #ShareYourPay https://t.co/UviEHZXflt— Katrina Kibben (@KatrinaKibben) April 12, 2016Are you ready to help increase salary transparency? Share your salary on Glassdoor anonymously. #ShareYourPayVideo Replay: Watch the entire Glassdoor Roundtable Discussion and learn more about what can be done to reach pay equalitylast_img read more

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Want to Work Remotely? Here’s How to Ask

first_imgIn the midst of summer and warmer weather, the option to work remotely may feel more than appealing than ever. But if your company still expects you to be in the office from 9 to 5, be mindful of how you ask your boss. This could make all the difference in whether your request will be approved.You will likely get nowhere if you pitch your boss based on all the reasons why a flexible work schedule will personally help you. Instead, make the case about how it will help your team and your company.“As employees, you always have to make it from the point of view of the business,” says Tonya Lain, regional vice president of Adecco Staffing. “As soon as it becomes personal, it’s not credible, and you lose any opportunity to have a real business discussion.”Make a PlanBefore you bring up the idea to your boss, make a formal plan of how you’d like to start working remotely. Determine whether you’d prefer to work from home every other Friday, or shift your schedule from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Explain how you will make yourself available throughout the day – whether through regular email or phone check-ins, instant messenger, video chat, etc.Focus on ProductivityOutline how this new schedule could increase your productivity. For example, if your company has an open office environment, explain how working remotely could help you focus on tasks without distraction. If you commute to the office, calculate how much time you could save by working from home. If you work closely with colleagues, clients or vendors that are based in different time zones, explain how shifting your schedule could positively impact your work flow. Make sure to weave in how your new schedule will impact your goals.Be RealisticDoes your role require you to have a lot of in-person meetings? Are you a newer employee and still getting familiar with your team and how it operates? Do you handle a lot of sensitive information? Even if working from home sounds appealing, a regular remote schedule may not be the best for you and your current role. If that’s the case, consider adjusting your plan to ask to work from home on special occasions, such as a Friday before a three-day weekend.Adds Ochstein,“Not all companies in all industries can make flex time and remote working work due to their industry or the nature of their business. Companies that are hyper collaborative or that put an emphasis on working in teams may want their employees working face-to-face as opposed to Skype.”NegotiateIf your company culture already embraces flex time, than it will likely be easier for you to get your plan approved. But if your company bristles at these kinds of perks, it could be an uphill battle.One solution is to ask your boss for a trial period of 30 or 60 days. This allows your boss to proactively evaluate how your new schedule impacts your productivity. This also gives you the option to test out your schedule and adjust where needed._____________________________________________________________________________________________Does work-life balance matter to you? Check out our 25 Best Jobs for Work-Life Balance.If working remotely isn’t an option for you, would more perks make a difference? Get inspired with our Top 20 Employee Benefits & Perks._____________________________________________________________________________________________last_img read more

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How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job

first_imgCover letters don’t get enough credit today, but they are actually a valuable instrument in the job seeker’s toolkit. They give you a chance to stand out and share more of you than your resume and application allow.Here’s how to write an awesome cover letter:Toss Out Those TemplatesThe most popular advice for writing cover letters usually involves using a template. But you should focus on customizing your letter to your audience, not filling out an existing template. When you’re applying to a medical supply company, for example, your cover letter should be different from the one you’re writing for a retail organization. Conduct research on the company as well as the position to determine the best way to customize. Brush up on their competitors as well to develop a deeper understanding about what makes them unique.[Related: Search Open Jobs in Your Area Hiring Now!]You want them to know you did your homework and are engaged with the industry. Use your research wisely in your cover letter. For example, note how their recent press release that announced a new project management solution reminded you of some of the hurdles you overcame in the past during one of your big marketing campaigns.Tell Your StoryThe framework for your cover letter should depend on the stories you want to tell. Remember, a cover letter complements your resume; it does not regurgitate it. Hiring professionals want to see who you are. Before drafting your cover letter, compare your skills with the requirements for the position. Use venn diagrams to brainstorm and find what competencies you want to highlight and what specific experiences you want to share. Assign “me” to the circle on the left and “employer” to the circle on the right. Under “me,” list your experiences and skill set, and under “employer,” add the preferred and required skills they list in their job description. Then identify what falls into both circles, and that overlap will inspire the content of your cover letter. You have to connect your relevant skills to those necessary for the job.[Related: What Interview Questions Will You Get Asked?]Let’s say you’re applying for a marketing director position. Among other aspects in the description, the job requires several years of marketing experience, a deep knowledge of lead generation, and strong communication skills. Describe how, in your previous role as a marketing manager, you ran several campaigns for your clients and exceeded their expectations of lead generation (with specific numbers, if possible), and how you also trained and mentored new associates on how to manage their own accounts, which improved client retention rates.Your anecdote is accomplishing a lot at once—it’s demonstrating one of your top hard skills, lead nurturing, and showcasing how you can collaborate with trainees, communicate effectively, and educate new employees on processes and client relations. You’re proving that you can meet the communication standards and marketing knowledge they’re seeking.Express Your PassionYou shouldn’t just say that you want the job or that you love your industry. You have to show your passion. Share why your career path best suits you and how your love for your work drives and motivates you. For example, answer some questions about what made you want to enter the field, how your personality helps you succeed, and what past experiences influenced your career decisions.Recruiters always remember the personal side of cover letters—this is when you become more than just another applicant. They connect your experiences with your name because you’re giving them another dimension of you, sharing what makes you unique.[Related: Best Places to Work]Pick an Appropriate Voice and ToneAnother benefit of researching the company is that you will get an idea of what their culture is like. You can use their culture to dictate the tone you want to use, which may differ greatly, depending on where you apply. For example, the tone of your letter for a legal consulting firm likely will differ from a tech startup. The former may be more formal, while the latter is most likely a casual work environment. But ultimately, you don’t want to write your voice out of the cover letter. Be authentic and show some personality.If you’re unsure about what tone works best, select a more conversational approach. That doesn’t mean use slang. You still need to use proper and professional grammar. But the tone and language should be engaging, pleasant, and warm.End with a Call to ActionIt’s no secret that you want to advance through the application process. End your letter with a reason for them to contact you. But don’t add remarks like, “I’ll call to schedule an interview.” This doesn’t make you a go-getter, it crosses a boundary. Instead, let the call to action be polite and open ended, suggesting that you are excited to offer more information and that you’re looking forward to further discussing your value.Proof ItFinally, have friends and family read through the cover letter. Ask them to set aside their biases and assess the effectiveness of it. Does it capture who you are as a person? Did you use the right tone and voice? Does it make them want to call you so they can learn more about you? This is crucial to landing an interview.These tips should help you land an interview for the job of your dreams. ______________________________________________________________________________________________Did you land an interview? Research questions you might be asked, and see answers that helped other job seekers. ______________________________________________________________________________________________last_img read more

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A Victim, An HR Exec & A Lawyer: 3 Perspectives on Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

first_img*Interview subject’s name has been changed to protect her identity.TELL US: Have you experienced sexual harassment in the workplace? What did you do? Talk to women who have worked in offices and they’ll tell you about the sexual harassment they’ve endured or witnessed. Some look at the harassers as just another office “type” — the slacker, the liar, the brown-noser. We warn each other about them — the icky old man trying to give you a backrub or the notorious dirty joke teller. Avoid them.But what do we do about it if we can’t ditch the creep? Donald Trump claims that if his daughter Ivanka were harassed, she’d quit the job. That’s a joke on at least two levels. First, Trump has enormous resources. She can afford to quit and she can afford to sue. More importantly, she has power. And that’s what sexual harassment comes down to: power. But, what about the rest of us?[Related: 2016 Best Places to Work]For some, going to human resources can be futile. Molly*, 32, a junior engineer, at a mid-west tech start-up, learned that quickly. “I was getting hassled by the boss. He was always coming over to my desk, texting, staring. Then he told me not to hang out with the younger guys.” Stunned Molly told a friend. “He immediately wanted to go talk to my boss to get him to stop. But I knew he couldn’t. We’d both get fired.” Molly, like many of us, didn’t have any recourse without savings or a new job lined up. Eventually, she quit, did not pursue a complaint and simply told the HR person she was leaving because she was uncomfortable with the boss.An experienced HR professional, who wishes to remain anonymous, wasn’t surprised by her story. “First, Molly should have given more details. She made it easy for the HR staff to ignore her. HR may not have any power either. I’ve found, working for a large corporation, that the threat of bad publicity, loss of revenue and time in court, or any sort of disruption are threats that are taken seriously.”Does that mean you have to go all the way to court? Perhaps. But you must make the case. David Lowe, a well-known employment attorney, says there are a number of hurdles. First, you have to be believed. You have to weigh the threat to your reputation and what effects complaining, or even suing, will have on your career. “All my clients have tried hard to resolve issues before they come to me,” says Lowe, who won a notorious case against a Twitter executive brought by one of the original female founders.[Related: How to Deal With A Bad Boss]It takes guts to stand up. It took years for former news-anchor Gretchen Carlson to sue Roger Ailes, her boss at Fox. But instead of ruining her reputation, as many as twenty other women came forward to not only say that Aisles harassed them as well, but that the corporate culture may have supported his behavior. Now the owners of Fox have ordered an investigation and on July 21 Ailes resigned from Fox.Maybe we can all take a lesson from the Fox brouhaha and initiate a zero-tolerance policy at our offices. Protest inappropriate emails and texts rather than ignoring them. Stand up for junior staffers when you see harassment. Correct the otherwise good guy who doesn’t know he’s being offensive. Managers and HR team members, re-evaluate your practices regularly and remain vigilant. If someone complains about sexual harassment, act immediately to investigate the complaint. If the complaint turns out to be valid, your response should be swift and effective.Sexual harassment in the workplace should never be just another stressor of the job, and it is certainly not the cost of climbing the ladder in corporate America. Every employee and each facet of the organization needs to make eliminating harassment a priority. Anything less is unacceptable.last_img read more

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11 Jobs for Creative Types Hiring Now

first_img6. Museum Curator, SmithsonianIf art history is your life, there are few places better than the Smithsonian. For this federal government position, specialized is required. This includes experience conducting scholarly historical and technical research on such topics in space history as space technology, space programs, space policy/space diplomacy, or space science, as evidenced by authorship and publication of scholarly historical materials, such as articles or reviews in peer-reviewed journals, a Ph.D. dissertation, and/or presentations at professional conferences; exhibit content development; familiarity with space history artifacts; involvement in public programs and public service efforts.7. Makeup Marketing Manager, ChanelBeauty marketing mavens, your dream job is calling. Chanel is hiring a makeup marketing manager to oversee the growth of Chanel.com. The role is to have a holistic view of the segment within Chanel and the market, via in depth analysis, so they can make strategic recommendations on execution across distribution channels and product / shade development.The operational challenge of this role will be coordinating efforts across different departments to ensure all initiatives are supporting the overarching business objective for a specific launch or project. Have an MBA and a love of Coco? Click apply now.8. Specials Teacher (Art, Music, Dance, Performing Arts, PE), Uncommon SchoolsCalling all arts teachers. Uncommon Schools is looking for a teacher who can plan and teach varied content area curriculum. Design, direct and produce school productions annually, and community meetings weekly. Show unwavering commitment to urban youth achieving greatness. Create a positive, structured learning environment to ensure that students embrace the school’s core values, high expectations, and strict code of conduct. Candidates must have a proven track-record of high achievement in the classroom. A valid State Certification is helpful but not required. Belief in and alignment with Uncommon’s core beliefs and educational philosophy is non-negotiable.9. Videographer, Refinery29Refinery29, the largest independent fashion and style website in the U.S., is looking for an experienced videographer to join their expanding in-house video department. If you love nothing more than to be in the field shooting and producing video content, you’ll love this job. Get excited to shoot a variety of styles of original and branded content, in the field and in the studio, including documentary pieces, commercial-style shoots, long-form, etc. Candidates need to have 3+ years of experience shooting–both DSLR and prosumer cameras. Plus, the Ability to cohesively and effectively work within a large creative organization, to embrace new experiences and take direction well. Your ideas will not always win out and you have to be ok with that. R29 welcomes smart, intuitive candidates who have a passion for working in video production and for storytelling.10. Writer, Tribune Media CompanyBreak into television writing now. The primary purpose of the Associate Producer is to write and gather information for highly produced newscasts, to assist with Assignment desk duties and to roll for daily newscasts. Be prepared to submit story ideas daily, work promotional events, and produce opens and graphic elements for a highly produced newscast.11. Assistant Photo Editor, The FoundryThe Foundry at Time Inc. is looking for an enthusiastic Assistant Photo Editor who will be doing extensive stock photo research, advanced photo retouching, shoot production, and general department admin. The candidate should also have proven experience with shooting still photography and video, as well as video-editing skills. You will compile and edit stock agency photo research, pulling strong compelling imagery for various clients. Candidates who will excel in this role will be multi-tasters, organized, team-focused, eager and self-motivated.Search All Open Jobs Hiring Now In Your Area! 3. Graphic Designer, NovaCopyNovaCopy is seeking an experienced graphic designer to own the creation and maintenance of both marketing assets and content created to support their products and other marketing goals. From concept through execution, this candidate will improve NovaCopy’s user experience by bringing the brand to life and keeping it consistent across our various touch points. This candidate needs to possess the ability to turn around creation on short notice with excellent quality as well as learn product marketing skills.4. Crew Leader, SmashboxDo you live for lipstick? Can you contour in your sleep? Smashbox wants you. As a Smashbox Crew Leader, you will motivate and manage the crew members ensuring that the entire crew combine excellent customer service with makeup application, have a passion for color and people with the ability to work towards and achieve retail sales targets. You will work as part of a dedicated team, where you will lead sharing ideas for building and sharing our brand story, whilst working together to ensure the smooth and efficient running of this busy studio.5. Photographer, Bella Baby PhotographyBella Baby Photography is the premier hospital photography company. Bella Baby photographers are in hospitals across the country to capture once in a lifetime memories—welcoming a newborn baby to the world. The perks of this role include flexible hours, travel, and working with new people daily. In order to be considered, your application must include a link to your online portfolio and/or website, including work samples capturing indoor/natural light photography. Whether you’re a photographer, a graphic designer, a yoga teacher or a curator, Glassdoor has got just the job for you. We’ve put together an irresistible list of cool roles hiring now. Plus, you know Glassdoor has all the insight on companies hiring, salaries and benefits, plus reviews from other employees.Roll up your sleeves and get your CV ready to go.1. Senior Creative Director, AmazonAmazon is seeking creative, talented and experienced people from the entertainment industry and advertising community to join their team to market the original programming that Amazon is distributing through Amazon Prime Video. The Creative Director of Amazon Studios is responsible for directing the development and execution of all creative aspects of a marketing campaign. Must have 10+ years of experience in film and/or network TV marketing.2. Assistant Designer – Swimwear, Land’s EndLooking to design for an iconic American brand? The Assistant Designer for Lands’ End will assist and support the Designer in Swim design and development of new styles. This role is responsible for helping to develop themes, color, fabrications, silhouettes, and mood for upcoming season as well as working with manufacturers to develop original textiles and patterns. Applicants need to have the ability to do flat drawings/sketches for design and prototypes, and being proficient in Photoshop and Illustrator and knowledge of CAD is helpful.last_img read more

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