Kapil Sharma Show Archana Puran Singh reveals how she was brought onboard

first_imgArchana Puran Singh, Navjot Singh SidhuTwitterIt has been close to four months since Navjot Singh Sidhu left (or was asked) to leave The Kapil Sharma Show and Archana Puran Singh was brought onboard. From being there in place of Navjot for just two weeks to now becoming a permanent fixture on the show, Archana Puran Singh has had quite a journey.Talking about the same in an interview, Archana revealed what exactly transpired and how she was brought on-board when Navjot Singh Sidhu left. Archana revealed that when The Kapil Sharma Show started, she was still judging Comedy Circus, where she had seen Kapil Sharma earlier. She revealed that since she was judging that show, makers brought on-board Navjot Singh Sidhu.”When Sidhu went away for about two weeks, Kapil called me for two episodes. When he had to leave again for his election campaign, I was called for a couple of episodes. I was excited to be back because the backstage and onstage teams are pretty much the same as Comedy Circus. It was a sort of reunion and a lot of comfort working with Kapil and the team,” she told DNA.Talking about how Krushna Abhishek and Kapil Sharma make fun of her and keep pulling her leg on replacing Sidhu, Archana revealed, “This joke has been going on since Comedy Circus days. I was the judge and there were two others — from Satish Shah to Shekhar Suman to Arbaaz Khan, Johny Lever and Rohit Shetty — who kept changing; but I was constant. They used to make fun of me saying, ‘Yeh judges ko kha jaati hai’.”In an interview with HT, Archana Puran Singh had also spoken up about how different she is from Sidhu. She said, “We are two very different individuals. He has earned a name for himself and so have I. Our personalities are very different and both of us are happy in our own space. It’s just a coincidence that I am here and he is not and it goes on like that in our industry.”last_img read more

Chocolates chewing gums may harm your digestive system

first_imgA common food additive found in chewing gums, chocolates and breads may significantly reduce the ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and block pathogens, a new study has warned.”Titanium oxide is a common food additive and people have been eating a lot of it for a long time, but we were interested in some of the subtle effects, and we think people should know about them,” said Gretchen Mahler, a professor at the Binghamton University in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”There has been previous work on how titanium oxide nanoparticles affects microvilli, but we are looking at much lower concentrations,” Mahler said.”We also extended previous work to show that these nanoparticles alter intestinal function,” she said.Titanium dioxide is generally recognised as safe by the US Food and Drug administration and ingestion is nearly unavoidable. The compound is an inert and insoluble material that is commonly used for white pigmentation in paints, paper and plastics. It is also an active ingredient in mineral-based sunscreens for pigmentation to block ultraviolet light. However, it can enter the digestive system through toothpastes, as titanium dioxide is used to create abrasion needed for cleaning. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe oxide is also used in some chocolate to give it a smooth texture; in donuts to provide colour; and in skimmed milks for a brighter, more opaque appearance which makes the milk more palatable. A previous study had tested 89 common food products including gum, Twinkies, and mayonnaise and found that they all contained titanium dioxide.About five per cent of products in that study contained titanium dioxide as nanoparticles.”To avoid foods rich in titanium oxide nanoparticles you should avoid processed foods, and especially candy. That is where you see a lot of nanoparticles,” Mahler said. Researchers exposed a small intestinal cell culture model to the physiological equivalent of a meal’s worth of titanium oxide nanoparticles – 30 nanometres across – over four hours (acute exposure), or three meal’s worth over five days (chronic exposure). Acute exposures did not have much effect, but chronic exposure diminished the absorptive projections on the surface of intestinal cells called microvilli.With fewer microvilli, the intestinal barrier was weakened, metabolism slowed and some nutrients – iron, zinc, and fatty acids, specifically – were more difficult to absorb.Enzyme functions were negatively affected, while inflammation signals increased.The study was published in the journal NanoImpact.last_img read more