Neil Young Jams With The Heartbreakers Stephen Stills At Light Up The

first_img Twitter News Neil Young Joined By The Heartbreakers Onstage neil-young-jams-heartbreakers-stephen-stills-light-blues-2018 Facebook Neil Young Jams With The Heartbreakers, Stephen Stills At Light Up The Blues 2018 Email Young brought some special guests out during his set at the annual benefit concert for Autism SpeaksBrian HaackGRAMMYs Apr 23, 2018 – 5:33 pm At the fifth annual Light Up The Blues concert special for Autism Speaks, GRAMMY-winning singer/songwriter and folk rock icon Neil Young came prepared with a few special surprises on tap.Following a rousing performance of the piano ballad “Birds” from After The Goldrush, Young informed the gathered crowd that he planned to bring his “brother” up on stage. Moments later, out walked Stephen Stills. Prior to joining up with David Crosby and Graham Nash to form Crosby Stills and Nash, Stills worked closely with Young as co-founding members of Buffalo Springfield.After the pair played a brief, tight set incorporating such favorites as “Long May You Run,” “For What It’s Worth” and “Mr. Soul,” the duo became a trio as Patti Smith walked onstage to join them for “People Have The Power.”Prior to joining Young for his own surprise performance, Stills brought out a few unexpected guests of his own during a previous set, as Mike Campbell, Benmont Tench and Steve Ferrone of the Heartbreakers took the stage together for the first time since the passing of their onetime band leader Tom Petty. Together with Stills, the band treated the audience to a rendition of “I Won’t Back Down,” that served as an impromptu tribute to their fallen friend.Light Up The Blues was originally founded by Stills and his wife Kristen as a fund-raising effort to benefit Autism research. Since its inception, the concert has traditionally featured strong lineups of classic musicians, actors and stand-up comedians. Jack Black has hosted the event for all five iterations.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read morelast_img read more

The TCL 75inch Roku TV is on sale at Best Buy for

first_imgTCL All the best Prime Day deals are at Amazon, right? Nope: For a limited time, Best Buy has the TCL 75S425 75-inch Roku TV for $799.99. Regular price: $999.99.Walmart has it for the same price — which will give you option of returning it locally should it have a problem or not meet your expectations. Update: This appears to be out of stock at Amazon, but Walmart still has inventory, at least for the moment. See it at AmazonAlthough the 4 Series has been around awhile, this 75-inch model appears to be an early-2019 addition. That’s why you won’t find it mentioned in David Katzmaier’s review of the TCL S425 series. Katz liked the overall value proposition of the 4 Series, though found the image quality a bit lacking — especially compared with the aforementioned 6 Series. The Amazon user reviews are more encouraging, with an average 4.3-star rating from over 900 buyers. Take note, however, that those apply to all the sizes in the lineup, not just the 75-inch. So it’s hard to say for sure what users thought of the 75S425. My take: If you’ve been thinking about a really big TV, this is one of the best deals I’ve seen. And in case you’re wondering, the 6 Series in this size is currently $1,400. It may be a while before it gets anywhere near this price. Your thoughts? Read more: The best TVs for 2019   The Cheapskate TCL’s cheap Roku TVs are the go-to choice for tight budgets Originally published on July 2. Update, July 15: Removed bonus deal, changed TV availability CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! TCL Now playing: Watch this: Tags Share your voice Comments 15 1:59 Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. TVslast_img read more

Can Neutrons be Used in Quantum Computers

first_img Explore further Hasegawa, a scientist affiliated with the Atominstitut der Österreichischen Universitäten and PRESTO at the Japan Science and Technology Agency, feels that the most recent experiment undertaken by him and his colleagues will offer a new way to look at questions involving quantum information processing. The results of the experiment appear in Physical Review Letters with the title “Quantum Contextuality in a Single-Neutron Optical Experiment.”Hasegawa explains that photons are most often used in quantum information technology, but that he hopes that this recent experiment, which is fundamental in nature, will contribute to the consideration of different quantum systems, including neutrons, for quantum information processing. Hasegawa and his colleagues, Rudolf Loidl and Matthias Baron from the Atominstitut and from the Institut Laue Langevin in France, and Gerald Badurek and Helmut Rauch at the Atominstitut, suggest that noncontextual theories involving neutrons are clearly violated with the results of this experiment. This most recent experiment is related to a paper published in 2003 in the journal Nature. In the previous paper, Hasegawa and his colleagues address Bell-like inequalities found in neutrons. However, with this new experiment the Kochen-Specker theorem is tackled, looking at quantum contextuality: “We use a neutron interferometer, and the Schrödinger equation represents our phenomena. We wanted to show a contradiction in noncontextual theories. We wanted to show a prediction in quantum mechanics. There’s a contradiction in Kochen-Specker with photons, and we wanted to show it with neutrons.” Hasegawa explains that the experiment took place at Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in France, with the largest reactor in the world, and made use of polarized neutron beams split inside the interferometer. With some manipulation, observations of three separate products were measured. After the analysis was performed, the values were found to be outside the limits predicted by noncontextual hidden variable theory. The contradiction was found.There is no way to obtain a completely ideal experimental situation, Hasegawa admits, but the interferometer was key to the experiment. “Our neutron interferometer experiment is one of the best suited for such a fundamental experiment.” He also points out that single neutrons were used. “Instead of two particles as usually used in two-photon entanglement experiments,” Hasegawa says, “we used two degrees of freedom in single particles.” Even though entanglement between different particles is considered essential for their use in quantum information processing, this does not appear to be the case with single-neutrons. With the use of entanglement between degrees of freedoms in this experiment, Hasegawa believes that single particles are good candidates for quantum information processing: “This neutron case is completely different from the photon case,” he says. “They have mass and spins and obey Schrödinger equation. This experiment shows that they can probably be used for information processing as well as for fundamental research in quantum mechanics just like photons.”Hasegawa continues: “I hope that this fundamental experiment can help with further technical development in quantum information processing.”By Miranda Marquit, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com.All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Can Neutrons be Used in Quantum Computers? (2006, December 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-12-neutrons-quantum.html The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin?center_img “In quantum mechanics, you typically have arguments about locality and non-locality,” Yuji Hasegawa tells PhysOrg.com. “But in our experiment we are testing correlation between degrees of freedom.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Scientists achieve perfect efficiency for watersplitting halfreaction

first_imgUnder visible light illumination, the nanoscale photocatalysts perform the water-splitting reduction half-reaction with 100% efficiency. Credit: Lilac Amirav, Technion-Israel Institue of Technology The researchers, Philip Kalisman, Yifat Nakibli, and Lilac Amirav at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel, have published a paper on the perfect efficiency for the water reduction half-reaction in a recent issue of Nano Letters.”I strongly believe that the search for clean and renewable energy sources is crucial,” Amirav told Phys.org. “With the looming energy crisis on one hand, and environmental aspects, mainly global warming, on the other, I think this is our duty to try and amend the problem for the next generation. “Our work shows that it is possible to obtain a perfect 100% photon-to-hydrogen production efficiency, under visible light illumination, for the photocatalytic water splitting reduction half-reaction. These results shatter the previous benchmarks for all systems, and leave little to no room for improvement for this particular half-reaction. With a stable system and a turnover frequency of 360,000 moles of hydrogen per hour per mole of catalyst, the potential here is real.”When an H2O molecule splits apart, the three atoms don’t simply separate from each other. The full reaction requires two H2O molecules to begin with, and then proceeds by two separate half-reactions. In the oxidation half-reaction, four individual hydrogen atoms are produced along with an O2 molecule (which is discarded). In the reduction half-reaction, the four hydrogen atoms are paired up into two H2 molecules by adding electrons, which produces the useful form of hydrogen: H2 gas. (Left) Transmission electron microscope images of the nanorod photocatalysts with (a) one and (b) two platinum tips. (Right) A comparison of the efficiencies shows the advantage of using a single platinum tip. Credit: Kalisman, et al. ©2016 American Chemical Society Journal information: Nano Letters (Phys.org)—Splitting water is a two-step process, and in a new study, researchers have performed one of these steps (reduction) with 100% efficiency. The results shatter the previous record of 60% for hydrogen production with visible light, and emphasize that future research should focus on the other step (oxidation) in order to realize practical overall water splitting. The main application of splitting water into its components of oxygen and hydrogen is that the hydrogen can then be used to deliver energy to fuel cells for powering vehicles and electronic devices. Explore further In the new study, the researchers showed that the reduction half-reaction can be achieved with perfect efficiency on specially designed 50-nm-long nanorods placed in a water-based solution under visible light illumination. The light supplies the energy required to drive the reaction forward, with the nanorods acting as photocatalysts by absorbing the photons and in turn releasing electrons needed for the reaction. Citation: Scientists achieve perfect efficiency for water-splitting half-reaction (2016, February 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-scientists-efficiency-water-splitting-half-reaction.html Clean energy from water © 2016 Phys.org The 100% efficiency refers to the photon-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, and it means that virtually all of the photons that reach the photocatalyst generate an electron, and every two electrons produce one H2 molecule. At 100% yield, the half-reaction produces about 100 H2 molecules per second (or one every 10 milliseconds) on each nanorod, and a typical sample contains about 600 trillion nanorods.One of the keys to achieving the perfect efficiency was identifying the bottleneck of the process, which was the need to quickly separate the electrons and holes (the vacant places in the semiconductor left after the electrons leave), and remove the holes from the photocatalyst. To improve the charge separation, the researchers redesigned the nanorods to have just one platinum catalyst instead of two. The researchers found that the efficiency increased from 58.5% with two platinum catalysts to 100% with only one.Going forward, the researchers plan to further improve the system. The current demonstration requires a very high pH, but such strong basic conditions are not always ideal in practice. Another concern is that the cadmium sulfide (CdS) used in the nanorod becomes corroded under prolonged light exposure in pure water. The researchers are already addressing these challenges with the goal to realize practical solar-to-fuel technology in the future.”We hope to implement our design rules, experience and accumulated insights for the construction of a system capable of overall water splitting and genuine solar-to-fuel energy conversion,” Amirav said. “The photocatalytic hydrogen generation presented here is not yet genuine solar-to-fuel energy conversion, as hole scavengers are still required. CdS is unfortunately not suitable for overall water splitting since prolonged irradiation of its suspensions leads to photocorrosion. We have recently demonstrated some breakthrough on this direction as well. The addition of a second co-catalyst, such as IrO2 or Ru, which can scavenge the holes from the semiconductor and mediate their transfer to water, affords CdS-based structures the desired photochemical stability. I believe this is an important milestone.” More information: Philip Kalisman, et al. “Perfect Photon-to-Hydrogen Conversion Efficiency.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b04813 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more