Tag: 上海最新油压2018

Appointment of Dr Christina Ramirez Smith as Special Advisor

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 20, 2017 – Nassau – University of The Bahamas (UB) announces the appointment of Dr. Christina Ramirez Smith as Special Advisor, reporting to the UB Board of Trustees’ Deputy Chair Mr. Lowell Mortimer, OBE, who also serves as Chair of the Investments and Fundraising Committee of the Board.Dr. Ramirez Smith is providing strategic guidance and support as required to build effective relationships with internal and external constituents.  She is advising on overall campaign management and organization including pipelines, prospect tracking, strategy, task assignment, and research.   She is also responsible for planning and hosting elite development events and special occasions.Having served in academia for almost three decades, Dr. Ramirez Smith has extensive experience as an Educational Administrator and Professor of Educational and Higher Education Administration, Leadership, Policy and Planning.  She studies higher education with an emphasis on the preparation of leaders for the global workforce.   Her other areas of expertise include organisational development and change, the impact of debt on graduate students, higher education finance and policy, as well as the unique mental health issues experienced by graduate students in addition to medical students.Her experience in development has included managing and executing strategies for fundraising, grant writing, developing strategic plans for fundraising and federal and private donor cultivation at Jacksonville University, Florida where she served as Dean of the School of Education and Director of Teacher Education.   She was most recently Associate Professor of Educational Leadership at Hampton University.A native of Georgetown, Exuma, Dr. Ramirez Smith began her career at Claridge Primary School as a Special Educator and served as founding Director for Personnel and Training at Adanac Investments Company in Grand Bahama. During that time, Dr. Ramirez Smith taught at the former College of The Bahamas in the Business Division.She earned a Bachelor of Science in Elementary and Special Education from the University of Idaho, ID (Honours), a Master of Science in Educational Administration from Morgan State University, MD, and a doctorate in Administration, Planning and Policy from Boston University, MA.Press Release: UBlast_img read more

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Big Little Lies Adam Scott Making a scene

first_img Jun 14 • The secret screen life of Being Frank star Jim Gaffigan Did you play with a lot of tech when you were a kid? What was your first computer? Scott: You know, my dad and my brother had the very first Apple II and then the Apple IIe, and then the very first Macintosh, which we still have. I don’t even know if it turns on anymore. I think it does. My brother is still in computers. He’s a designer — a programmer — but I was never adept with computers on the level that my father and my brother were. But they were always around, and we would go to … what is the Apple convention up in the Bay Area? I think AirPods are a real game-changer. I just love that they’ve kind of subtly changed my life in a weird way. Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown on voicing a not-always-perfect pig Talking with Chewbacca Post a comment With the entire series in front of you to discover and being a kid, it really expanded my imagination and was influential on my taste for stories and movies and what I found interesting. So I jumped at the chance to be in The Twilight Zone. You play Ed Mackenzie on Big Little Lies. Season 1 is over, and I know you’re doing season 2. What’s the best thing about working on Big Little Lies?  Scott: The cast, the writing and directing. And season 2 is going to be really fun for people. It’s really juicy. Anything else you can say? Scott: I can’t. adam-scott-studio-session-331Scott: “Meeting Mark Hamill was all I wanted as a kid.” Mark Mann You sure? Scott: A hook will come down and pick me up and you’ll never see me again. You also play a demon, named Trevor, on The Good Place. Did you pick that name? Scott: No, no. Mike Schur, who created the show, I believe picked Trevor. If Michael, the Ted Danson character who designed the Good Place, were to design a personal hell just for you, what would it be? Scott: Personal hell built just for me? There would be really loud afternoon TV advertisements playing at all times. Like for insurance, for injury law. It seems like it’s all life insurance, injury law and medications that play during the day, blaring at all times. It would be really hot. There would be no AC. And all the clothing would be really tight and uncomfortable. Now playing: Watch this: Adam Scott is a quiet standout Amazon Tags reading • Big Little Lies’ Adam Scott: Making a scene Apple $144 2:45 See it Aug 28 • In pursuit of perfect ice Mentioned Above Apple AirPods 2019 (Charging Case) TV and Movies See It See It Share your voice Apple Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown: ‘Acting is about reconnecting with a sense of play’ See It 0 Kristen Bell was hosting Jimmy Kimmel’s show and surprised you with a visit from Mark Hamill, whom you once invited to your birthday party when you were a kid. Your face is like the kid who got every birthday wish in their entire life. What was that like? Scott: It was really weird because it was obviously being televised — and to be thrown off guard and surprised like that on camera, with an audience, is very strange and felt Truman Show-y. But really cool. I mean, meeting Mark Hamill was all I wanted as a kid, so it was obviously a big deal. Really cool. He gave you a lightsaber. Scott: He did, yeah. You still have it? Scott: Yeah, it’s cool. You’re in a classic episode of the new remake of The Twilight Zone. Why did you want to do it? Scott: I’m in Nightmare at 30,000 Feet, which is a remake of Nightmare at 20,000 Feet. William Shatner did it in the original series and then John Lithgow did it in Twilight Zone: The Movie in the early ’80s, both of which I’ve seen dozens of times. When we got the script for the new series of The Twilight Zone, I think I said yes before I even read it, which is not what you’re supposed to do. But The Twilight Zone is my favorite show ever. I used to stay up every night because they would play reruns at 11 p.m. every night. I had a 5-inch black-and-white TV in my bedroom. It was the only TV in the house, and I would keep the volume low so my mom wouldn’t know and just watch Twilight Zone every single night. See All Macworld Expo. Scott: We must have gone to that. I kind of grew up watching that evolve, watching Apple grow as a company. I still love their gear, and their gadgets are beautiful and intuitive. So you’re an iPhone user? Scott: Yeah. And I think AirPods are a real game-changer. I just love that they’ve kind of subtly changed my life in a weird way. It keeps you connected, which is both good or bad. It makes being connected effortless. You can stay connected to an audiobook or a podcast or music or whatever it is. It just makes it all easier. I mean, we’ve had headphones and earbuds for years. But these — it’s a brilliant design. I have other Bluetooth headphones from other companies, and none of them are as intuitive as the AirPods, which just blend in with your body. This is all sounding very sci-fi, but it really is a brilliant design. It feels like it’s part of you, in a weird way. I’ve found them to be my favorite Apple product in a long time. star-wars-chewbacca-dollScott had fun playing with this interactive Chewbacca doll. Hasbro Because of that seamlessness? Scott: Yeah, ease of control too. It’s really simple just to double tap. I really love it. I’ve had the Apple Watch now for a few months, and I’m starting to feel the benefits of it. And now I feel weird without it (gesturing to his bare wrist). But the AirPods are … a really simple step up in tech. Some people think they look kind of geeky. They certainly make a statement about who you are when you wear them walking down the street. Scott: So people think they’re too geeky? Because they’re bright white? But that’s good branding. If they’re invisible, then I don’t know. I think they look cool. I think they look beautiful. But I would be anxious to get black ones if they came out with those. That’s a cool idea. You’re not only an actor, you also produce. Are you at all looking at the world of virtual reality or augmented reality? Scott: Not yet. But I think it’s inevitable that everyone will. It seems like things are heading in that direction. But we’ve so far fallen short of integrating it into everyday life and into home entertainment on a grand scale. I’m not sure exactly what it is that’s holding it back from becoming something that everyone kind of just grabs when they’re ready to consume entertainment at home. You guys probably have a better handle on why it hasn’t. Maybe the ultimate set hasn’t landed yet. Yes, some headsets are heavy, uncomfortable. Some people get nauseous, so throwing up kind of gets in the way. Scott: Not the funnest part of being entertained. But I’ve experienced it a few times, and it’s extraordinary. I think it’s just a matter of finding the wearable tech that’s seamless and comfortable, right? That’s the biggest hurdle, I would imagine. Do you have a smart home? Are you into any smart home gear? Scott: I mean, here and there. We haven’t fully jumped into that, mostly because I always feel a little reticent. You always feel like if you commit to something, it’s going to change. And I don’t mind turning on a light switch. We have a [smart] thermostat, and it’s really handy. But I don’t need the entire home to be a smart home — at least not yet. Nightmare at 30,000 FeetIn an episode of the Twilight Zone reboot, Scott plays a nervous passenger who’s convinced his flight is about to crash. Robert Falconer/CBS © 2018 CBS Interactive Self-driving cars: Good idea or bad? Scott: I think they’re a good idea. It’s an exciting idea. And I think in a few years it won’t be dangerous anymore. It’s probably safer than a human driving a car right now. It’s where we’re headed. Whether it’s safe or not, that’s where it’s all going. What tech do you wish had never been invented? Scott: That’s a really good question, but I don’t know. How about tech you’d like to see invented just for you that you haven’t seen? Scott: I still feel like they haven’t perfected the pillow. Because even some of the memory foam ones, they’re — it’s great, but then it’s not. It’s too hot. I feel like the pillow has a way to go, and I’m willing and able to wait, but excited to find the perfect pillow. Best Buy Now playing: Watch this: CNET Magazine It’s easy to see why Adam Scott is often cast as the approachable everyman. He’s pretty low-key in person, with a deadpan delivery that prompts double takes. It’s a persona he’s been able to transform into notable characters he once described as “befuddled beta males.” On NBC’s Parks and Recreation, he embodied Ben Wyatt, a calzone-loving state auditor who dresses up as Batman and owns his encyclopedic knowledge of Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, Star Trek and Game of Thrones. In HBO’s drama series Big Little Lies, he plays Ed Mackenzie, the beleaguered second husband of main character Madeline (Reese Witherspoon), and shows he can stand up to his alpha wife: “Look, I may not be the good-looking adventure ride, OK? But there is something to be said for being there, for being truthful, for being somebody you can steadfastly count on. I will not be anybody’s runner-up.” He’ll return for season 2 of Big Little Lies on June 9 (read our review here). In Jordan Peele’s reboot of the classic sci-fi series The Twilight Zone, which debuted in April on CBS All Access, Scott takes a lead role. (Editors’ note: CBS operates CBS All Access and owns CNET.) He plays a reporter with PTSD who boards a plane and finds an old MP3 player in the seat pocket in front of him. It plays a podcast, which seems to be from the future, about the mystery of the tragic flight he’s on, transforming him into the weirdo who no one will believe is trying to save them from disaster. But right now, Scott has us all smiling. We’ve surprised him with Star Wars collectibles — he’s a huge fan of the sci-fi epic — and he riffs about the interactive Chewbacca doll and talking Yoda mask. Adam Scott: “I’ve just always been a Star Wars fan.” Mark Mann “I feel like everyone in this room was transported to Yoda’s home planet just for a second,” he tells us after trying on the mask. “Don’t worry guys, it’s just me. It’s just a mask. I put a mask on. Everyone relax.” By the time he describes his own personal hell — a nod to his role as Trevor, a rude (but funny) demon, on the NBC comedy series The Good Place — we’re laughing out loud. “Personal hell built just for me? There would be really loud afternoon TV advertisements playing at all times. Like for insurance, for injury law,” he says during our CNET Magazine cover shoot in Los Angeles. “It would be really hot. There would be no AC. And all the clothing would be really tight and uncomfortable.” Fall 2019 MagazineSee more great stories from CNET Magazine. Mark Mann Scott also talked about staying up late watching reruns of The Twilight Zone on his family’s black-and-white TV when he was a kid, how his Apple AirPod wireless headphones have changed his life, and why he thinks there’s an opportunity for someone to reinvent the pillow. Here’s an edited transcript of our conversation. Q: You’re a big Star Wars fan. What’s the appeal? Scott: I guess anyone under the age of 75 is probably a Star Wars fan. It’s been around for so long now. I clearly remember The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi when I was in elementary school, so I really grew up with them. My friends and I were all about Star Wars. It was kind of a rite of passage to collect the figures and make your own lightsabers. I’ve just always been a Star Wars fan. I think I said yes before I even read it, which is not what you’re supposed to do. But The Twilight Zone is my favorite show ever. • $144 3:04 $159 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Apple AirPods 2019 Review • AirPods 2019 review: King of truly wireless earphones crowned with small enhancements $144 CNET Magazinelast_img read more

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Secret Audit Points to Enrollment Fraud at DC High School

first_imgA secret audit of an acclaimed D.C. high school hints at widespread enrollment fraud to avoid $12,000 more in tuition charged to nonresidents.Famed arts school Duke Ellington School of the Arts is under fire after wide spread enrollment fraud was revealed. (Courtesy photo)State Superintendent of Education Hanseul Kang told The Washington Post Tuesday the annual audit of student residency at D.C. schools uncovered “specific concerns” at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Public records associated with students’ parents found reasons to suspect claims of D.C. residency.Initial results were shared in December with the state superintendent’s and attorney general’s offices, but kept secret until the Post report.About 70 of Ellington’s 566 students are on record as living outside the District, and their families pay tuition to the school system. The probe is focused not on those students, but on the majority who claim to be D.C. residents.last_img read more

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Bahia Principe properties streamline into four categories

first_img<< Previous PostNext Post >> Wednesday, December 13, 2017 Share Posted by Travelweek Group center_img Bahia Principe properties streamline into four categories MIAMI — Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts has rejigged its 24-hotel portfolio, reclassifying properties into four categories and segments in an effort to simplify the booking process.The four hotel categories include: Luxury Bahia Principe, featuring the brand’s most luxurious hotels; Grand Bahia Principe, comprising five-star hotels; Sunlight Bahia Principe, for all Spain-based properties; and Fantasia Bahia Principe, a family-friendly concept that offers thematic hotels, inspired by the success of the brand’s newest property in Punta Cana.The brand will debut Fantasia Bahia Principe Tenerife, its second Fantasia property, in November 2018 in Spain.“The Fantasia Bahia Principe hotels will deliver the highest standards in quality and service, but, above all, will guarantee a thematic experience in which everyone can enjoy our first-class amenities and exciting activities, regardless of age,” said Isabel Pinero, Vice-President of Marketing & Communications for Grupo Piñero, the parent company of Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts.In addition to the new categories, hotels will also be segmented by experience: Treasure, hotels in off-the-beaten path locations; Escape, adults-only properties; and Family & Friends, for travellers with varying age groups and vacation preferences.More news:  CIE Tours launches first-ever River Cruise CollectionHere is a list of Bahia properties under their new categories:LUXURY BAHIA PRINCIPELuxury Bahia Principe Cayo Levantado (Dominican Republic)Luxury Bahia Principe Samaná (Dominican Republic)Luxury Bahia Principe Fantasia (Dominican Republic) – to be renamed Fantasia Bahia Principe Punta Cana starting November 2018Luxury Bahia Principe Ambar Blue (Dominican Republic)Luxury Bahia Principe Ambar Green (Dominican Republic)Luxury Bahia Principe Bougaville (Dominican Republic)Luxury Bahia Principe Esmeralda (Dominican Republic)Luxury Bahia Principe Runaway Bay (Jamaica)Luxury Bahia Principe Akumal (Mexico)Luxury Bahia Principe Slan Ka’an (Mexico)GRAND BAHIA PRINCIPEGrand Bahia Principe Cayacoa (Dominican Republic)Grand Bahia Principe El Portillo (Dominican Republic)Grand Bahia Principe Punta Cana (Dominican Republic)Grand Bahia Principe La Romana (Dominican Republic)Grand Bahia Principe Turquesa (Dominican Republic)Grand Bahia Principe Bávaro (Dominican Republic)Grand Bahia Principe San Juan (Dominican Republic)Grand Bahia Principe Coba (Mexico)Grand Bahia Principe Tulum (Mexico)Grand Bahia Principe Jamaica (Jamaica)More news:  War of words between Transat, Group Mach ramps upSUNLIGHT BAHIA PRINCIPESunlight Bahia Principe Costa Adeje (Spain)Sunlight Bahia Principe Tenerife (Spain)Sunlight Bahia Principe San Felipe (Spain)Sunlight Bahia Principe Coral Playa (Spain)FANTASIA BAHIA PRINCIPEFantasia Bahia Principe Tenerife (Spain) – opening November 2018 Tags: Bahia Principe Hotels & Resortslast_img read more

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Radiation belt probes may help predict space weather

first_imghttp://news.rice.edu/files/2012/08/RESP-2-web.jpgEngineers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, prepare to place Radiation Belt Storm Probe spacecraft “B” in a thermal-vacuum chamber, where they can make sure the propulsion system will stand up to the range of hot, cold and airless conditions RBSP will face in outer space. The probe is one of two set for launch this month to help predict space weather. (Credit: JHU/APL) ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduRadiation belt probes may help predict space weatherRice physicist Anthony Chan prepares for launch of satellites to Earth’s Van Allen BeltsHOUSTON – (Aug. 16, 2012) – Living with a star can be a challenge, especially as Earthlings extend their reach into space. A Rice University scientist is contributing to an effort to make life more comfortable for both the people and satellites sent out there, and provide valuable research for those who remain planet-bound.Two Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) scheduled for launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., Aug. 23 will monitor space weather, from the normal eddies of particles that flow through what was once thought of as a void, to the sun’s raging plasma blasts that endanger astronauts, orbiting electronics and even the power distribution grid on Earth’s surface.The probes will do so from elongated orbits that take them into the heart of the Van Allen Belts, doughnut-shaped regions of high-energy particles encircling Earth. The two NASA spacecraft will travel through constantly changing magnetic fields that trap the high-energy particles but also keep the majority of the harsh radiation of the sun at bay. They’ll back each other up by gathering data on events from different perspectives to give researchers a clearer picture than ever of how solar storms affect the belts.“These two spacecraft have an unprecedented number of instruments, spanning fields and particles over exceptionally wide ranges,” said Anthony Chan, a Rice professor of physics and astronomy and part of the Energetic Particle, Composition and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which operates one of the instrument sets. “We think we’re finally going to be able to answer some basic questions about the physics of the Van Allen Belts, questions that have been around for over 50 years.”Chan said it is particularly satisfying that Rice is part of a project that promises to solve long-standing mysteries of the Van Allen Belts – and not only because Rice emeritus professor John Freeman was a student of James Van Allen himself. “There’s a very strong theory and simulation group at Rice in space plasma physics,” he said. “The most famous space physics model developed here, the Rice Convection Model, operates in a similar region of space to the Van Allan Belts, but with generally lower-energy particles.”Chan said the outer radiation belts contain energy in the million-electron-volt range. “We’re especially interested in the electrons, which in those energies are relativistic. They travel close to the speed of light and are much more energetic than anything else out there,” he said.His task will be to use data gathered from the probes to verify and refine his group’s theories and simulations. “We want to understand the dynamic variability of the outer belt and eventually be able to predict it to the point where it could be useful for spacecraft operators and designers,” he said. “That is one of the practical consequences of this research.”High-energy particles come primarily from the sun, which bombards Earth through coronal mass ejections (CME) that are expected to become more frequent as the sun approaches its “solar max” in 2013, and from coronal holes that appear during less-active periods.“Most of what we call magnetic storms are driven by solar-wind events,” Chan said. “Some are CMEs, which tend to produce the most violent storms. But another type is caused by high-speed streams in the solar wind that originate in coronal holes. In certain wavelengths, we see dark patches on the sun, usually near the poles. But they sometimes creep down, especially approaching solar minimum.“These holes have low density but very fast streaming solar wind,” he said, “and can cause some of the largest increases in relativistic electrons.” The particles can overwhelm sensitive electronic instruments like those aboard the location-finding GPS satellites that dot the skies and frequently spend time in the harsh environment of the Van Allen Belts.“Usually spacecraft avoid these regions, or they switch off equipment when they pass through because it disrupts their operation,” Chan said. “Radiation degrades the instruments’ lifetimes, but the RBSP satellites are designed to fly through these regions and last a number of years.”The twin satellites will allow researchers to gather the most accurate data yet from energetic events in the Van Allen Belts. They will sweep within 400 miles of Earth and out through the belts, which range from about 8,000 to 40,000 miles. Because researchers can see events triggered by solar activity coming (particularly with the STEREO and Hinode satellites standing guard), they’ll know where and when to look.Chan said he hopes the probes’ sophisticated instruments will lead to some surprises. “Because electrons are all identical, it’s hard to know where they’re coming from. Nevertheless, we think the majority of them are coming from the sun,” he said.“There was an interesting theory a while back that some of these relativistic electrons were coming from Jupiter,” Chan said. “There are times – and it’s not as crazy as it sounds – when Jupiter is magnetically connected to Earth. We’re sometimes on the same interplanetary magnetic field lines, and Jupiter is a strong source; it makes lots of radio waves and energetic electrons.“We see some small peaks about when we expect to see Earth and Jupiter magnetically connected. It’s a great idea and interesting to think about, but it’s probably very weak,” he said. “If it turns out to be much stronger than expected, it would be really interesting.“The most interesting results scientists get are the ones we don’t expect,” Chan said. “We design the missions looking for certain things and try to allow enough data collection in regions that haven’t been explored to look for something new. And you always hope you’ll find something new.”-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated links:Anthony Chan: http://aachan.web.rice.edu/RBSP home page: http://rbsp.jhuapl.edu/index.phpLiving With a Star program: http://lws.gsfc.nasa.gov/Images for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2012/08/0817_RESP-3-CHAN.jpgAnthony Chan (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 4 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to www.rice.edu/nationalmedia/Rice.pdf. http://news.rice.edu/files/2012/08/RESP-1-web.jpgTwin Radiation Belt Storm Probes will explore high-energy particles that become trapped in Earth’s protective Van Allen Belts. The data they return will help Earth-bound scientists, including Rice University physicist Anthony Chan, predict solar storms. (Credit: JHU/APL) FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more

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