Google Stadia launch info pricing to be revealed June 6

first_img Comment Google Stadia is a play-anywhere streaming game platform… Google announced Stadia at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco in March. The service will let gamers play standard PC games within anything that can browse the web, including a TV, a phone, a tablet and of course a PC. The games are powered by Google’s high-performance computers, which then stream the images to the web browser in a similar way Netflix streams videos. Gamers play using a controller Google designed, which connects through Wi-Fi to Stadia’s systems. Google says the service is designed as a way for people to play and watch gaming together.”Our ambition is far beyond a single game,” Google’s Phil Harrison said at GDC in March. Instead, the company sees the opportunity to give players “instant access” to a game by clicking a link.Originally published June 3, 10:03 a.m. PT.Update, 10:23 a.m.: Adds more background on Google Stadia. Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice Some news can’t wait for #E3. Tune into the first ever #StadiaConnect this Thursday 6/6 at 9AM PT for exciting announcements, games, and more → https://t.co/dKmKakQeQp pic.twitter.com/mZRagFGh4k— Stadia (@GoogleStadia) June 3, 2019 1:56 1 Google Tags Gaming Google says Stadia was designed as a way for people to play and watch gaming together. James Martin/CNET We’re not going to have to wait long to learn more about Google Stadia, the search giant’s upcoming streaming game service.On Monday, the official account for Google Stadia tweeted that launch information, game announcements and pricing would be revealed Thursday at 9 a.m. PT, during the first ever Stadia Connect event.”Some news can’t wait for #E3,” the company tweeted, referencing the Electronic Entertainment Expo. “Tune into the first ever #StadiaConnect this Thursday 6/6 at 9AM PT for exciting announcements, games, and more.”last_img read more

The TCL 75inch Roku TV is on sale at Best Buy for

first_imgTCL All the best Prime Day deals are at Amazon, right? Nope: For a limited time, Best Buy has the TCL 75S425 75-inch Roku TV for $799.99. Regular price: $999.99.Walmart has it for the same price — which will give you option of returning it locally should it have a problem or not meet your expectations. Update: This appears to be out of stock at Amazon, but Walmart still has inventory, at least for the moment. See it at AmazonAlthough the 4 Series has been around awhile, this 75-inch model appears to be an early-2019 addition. That’s why you won’t find it mentioned in David Katzmaier’s review of the TCL S425 series. Katz liked the overall value proposition of the 4 Series, though found the image quality a bit lacking — especially compared with the aforementioned 6 Series. The Amazon user reviews are more encouraging, with an average 4.3-star rating from over 900 buyers. Take note, however, that those apply to all the sizes in the lineup, not just the 75-inch. So it’s hard to say for sure what users thought of the 75S425. My take: If you’ve been thinking about a really big TV, this is one of the best deals I’ve seen. And in case you’re wondering, the 6 Series in this size is currently $1,400. It may be a while before it gets anywhere near this price. Your thoughts? Read more: The best TVs for 2019   The Cheapskate TCL’s cheap Roku TVs are the go-to choice for tight budgets Originally published on July 2. Update, July 15: Removed bonus deal, changed TV availability CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! TCL Now playing: Watch this: Tags Share your voice Comments 15 1:59 Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. TVslast_img read more

Mexico Brutal cartels fight over conflictfree gold revenues

first_img Heroin traffickers linked to the abduction and disappearance of 43 students a year ago are battling over millions of dollars paid by Canadian mining giant Goldcorp to a village in Mexicos southern gold belt, leading to a wave of murders.As a signatory to a Conflict-Free Gold Standard drawn up by the World Gold Council industry group, Goldcorp commits to extracting the precious metal in a manner that does not fuel unlawful armed conflict or contribute to serious human rights abuses. But residents of Carrizalillo in the impoverished state of Guerrero say the some $3m (£2m) a year in rent paid by Goldcorp for their land, which the mine is built on, is fuelling a bloody feud between two rival cartels. Village authorities say the company is not doing all it can to protect them.Juan Jesus Canaan, an activist who explores clandestine graves in search of missing people, said the presence of Los Filos mine and the wealth generated by it brings crime and drug addiction. Gold brings bonanza but it also brings other things with it. It brings crime, drug addiction, a lot of things. The villages economy, from this place and others, revolves around the mine, Canaan said.Some homes in Carrizalillo are scarred with bullet holes and broken windows after a series of assaults in the past year, some involving dozens of masked men firing automatic weapons. Authorities describe a struggle between two gangs – Guerreros Unidos and Los Rojos – over the mineral wealth that has split Carrizalillo into two factions, fanning chaos. The Guerreros Unidos gang is the primary suspect in the disappearance and apparent murder of 43 students last year, a case which has drawn international attention and fierce criticism of President Enrique Pena Nietos government.Carrizalillo villagers describe systematic extortion by both cartels. Each side accuses the other of supporting a rival cartel with the alleged backing of different state and federal security forces. At least 26 people have been killed since the feud escalated in mid-2014. Still, villagers welcome the wealth generated by the mine and have negotiated to maximize their benefits. Protests closed the mine for a month last year until Goldcorp agreed to more generous terms.Landholders say that under the May 2014 deal, Goldcorp pays the equivalent of 4oz of gold per hectare in rent to 175 landholders and a communal land fund – an estimated $3m a year at todays prices, which is a small fortune for a village of around 1,000. Goldcorp recognises that its Los Filos is operating in a conflict-affected or high-risk area, but federal police commissioner Enrique Galindo said that Goldcorp has not raised any alarms with police over potential risk at the mine.This mine in particular, I have spoken to the director and the chief of security of the mine. They did not report any risk situations. Those who present them is the community, due to the things we have explained.But the business, the mine, as an income generating area, has not presented, at least not to us as we have not been required, as being in a situation of risk, Galindo said.Some Carrizalillo villagers say they want Goldcorp to fund police and military checkpoints and patrols along the short stretch of road between the heavily guarded mine and the unprotected village, but Goldcorp says it is doing as much as it can.Goldcorps gold mining activities have been certified as conflict-free. Under the standard, companies operating in conflict zones must use their influence to avoid abuses by security forces and make them protect local populations. Closelast_img read more

India expels first group of Rohingya refugees

first_imgSahidullah, a man from the Rohingya community, holds his son on his lap as he speaks with Reuters inside his shack at a camp on the outskirts of Jammu on 5 October 2018. Photo: ReutersHours after Indian TV channels flashed that the country was deporting seven Rohingya Muslims to Myanmar, Sahidullah said he received a call from his nephew: “Uncle, please get us out of here. They will send us back too.”Sahidullah, a Rohingya living in the far north of India after fleeing what he called persecution in Buddhist-majority Myanmar in 2010, said his relative, Sadiur Rahman, 40, was lodged in one of several detention centres for illegal immigrants in the distant northeastern state of Assam.Rahman, he said, had been incarcerated with his brother and eight other relatives since being caught in 2012 at a railway station as they fled to India via Bangladesh. Sahidullah had taken the same route two years earlier, but like many others had escaped detection.He said Rahman made the phone call when he was taken out for a routine medical checkup on 3 October, the day when India moved the seven Rohingya men out of a similar detention centre and took them to the border.They were handed to the Myanmar authorities the next day, the first ever such deportations of Rohingya here, spreading panic among an estimated 40,000 refugees who have fled to India from its neighbour.About 16,500 of the refugees, including Sahidullah, have been issued identity cards by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) that it says helps them “prevent harassment, arbitrary arrests, detention and deportation”.India says it does not recognise the cards and has rejected the UN’s stand that deporting the Rohingya violates the principle of refoulement – sending back refugees to a place where they face danger.”Anyone who has entered the country without a valid legal permit is considered illegal,” said A. Bharat Bhushan Babu, a spokesman for the Ministry of Home Affairs. “As per the law, anyone illegal will have to be sent back. As per law they will be repatriated.”In recent days, Reuters interviewed dozens of Rohingya in two settlements, one in the northern city of Jammu and a smaller one in the capital, Delhi, and found communities who feel they are being increasingly vilified.Many now fear prime minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist government is about to act on its stated position – that it wants to deport all Rohingya Muslims from the country. With a general election due by next May, they worry that targeting them will be a populist tactic used by Modi and his allies.Hatred GrowingSahidullah – who like many Rohingya goes by only one name – is not just worried about his detained relatives but also his family living in a mainly Hindu region of India’s only Muslim-dominated state, Jammu & Kashmir, in the country’s northern tip.The restive Himalayan state that borders Pakistan and is home to Muslim separatists battling Indian rule, has the biggest population of Rohingya in the country with around 7,000 people scattered in various makeshift settlements, largely in the Jammu region.”We came to India because people told us things were better here, there’s more work and one could move freely unlike back home,” said Sahidullah, who works as a cleaner at a car showroom in Jammu city to support his aging amnesiac mother, wife and four children.”All that’s true and we are thankful to India for letting us live here. But hatred against us is growing,” he told Reuters as he sat on a colourful linen sheet laid on the floor of his self-made wood and plastic-sheet house built on a rented plot of land.Mohammed Arfaat, a 24-year-old Rohingya youth leader in Jammu, said that locals often accuse them of having links with militants without any proof.”They want us out of here and that has got our families worried,” said Arfaat, switching between English and Hindi as nearly a dozen community elders seated around him on the rough concrete floor of a Rohingya house started leaving for Friday prayers. “Everybody here is aware of the deportation and is afraid.”Indian authorities said that the repatriation of the seven was a routine procedure and that it sends all illegal foreigners back home.But the UNHCR voiced deep concern on Friday about the safety and security of those expelled, saying they had been denied access to legal counsel and a chance to have their asylum claims assessed.”Current conditions in Myanmar’s Rakhine state are not conducive for safe, dignified and sustainable return of stateless Rohingya refugees,” said UNHCR spokesman Andrej Mahecic.Most Rohingya used to live in Rakhine.In August last year, attacks by Rohingya fighters on security posts in Rakhine led to a bloody military crackdown that caused around 700,000 Rohingya to flee across the border to Bangladesh.The United Nations has accused Myanmar of acting against the Rohingya with “genocidal intent,” a charge Myanmar refutes, saying its military did not use excessive force and was reacting to militant attacks.Increasingly UglyThe atmosphere facing the Rohingya in India has been getting increasingly ugly.Jammu’s Chamber of Commerce & Industry last year threatened to launch an “identify and kill movement” against the settlers, which it said pushed the government into taking the issue of Rohingya more seriously.The chamber’s president, Rakesh Gupta, told Reuters on Friday that there was nothing new in taking the law into one’s hands if “someone becomes a threat to our security, to the nation’s security, and the security forces don’t tackle them”.In some of the more virulent parts of India’s media, the Rohingya are not only accused of being terrorists but also of trafficking in drugs and humans, and of having the money to elbow out local businesses.The Pioneer newspaper, which supports Modi’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), said in an editorial on Saturday that “the Rohingya are a problem”, declaring that those that are radicalised Islamist extremists need to be dealt with ruthlessly and the rest are economic migrants that India cannot afford to help.India, which considers itself a victim of Islamist militancy and is trying to boost economic ties with Myanmar to counter China, said late last year that it shared Myanmar’s concern about “extremist violence” by Rohingya militants.India’s home ministry has told the Supreme Court that it had reports from security agencies and other authentic sources “indicating linkages of some of the unauthorised Rohingya immigrants with Pakistan-based terror organisations and similar organisations operating in other countries”.”It’s definitely an election issue,” said Kavinder Gupta, a BJP legislator in Jammu & Kashmir and former deputy chief minister of the state.”It’s our decision to throw them out keeping in mind the security situation of the state,” he told Reuters on the sidelines of a campaign meeting for municipal elections. “We have made the home ministry aware of the need to send them back to their country.”Senior Jammu police officials said on condition of anonymity that they had identified all Rohingya in the area in preparation for their eventual deportation. They added they had not found any link of Rohingya with militants.Around 600 km (370 miles) south of Jammu, residents of a makeshift refugee camp in Delhi’s Shaheen Bagh also said they fear deportation.”We don’t want to leave India. Where will we go?” said Mohammed Harun, a 47-year-old Rohingya elder in Delhi. “There are refugees from other countries in India too. Why are we being targeted? Why do they send us to jail? It is only because we are Muslims. They don’t do this to the other refugees.”last_img read more

12 more killed in a single day as country reels from growing

first_imgRoad AccidentTwelve people, including six members of a family, were killed in road accidents in five districts on Sunday as the country reels from growing road fatalities since Eid-ul-Azha.Of them, eight were killed in a single incident in Cumilla district.A bus crashed into an auto-rickshaw on Cumilla-Noakhali regional highway at Jamtola in Lalmai upazila of Cumilla at noon, killing at least eight people, including six members of a family.The deceased were identified as Jashim Uddin, 47, a hotel owner, his mother Sakhina Begum, 70, wife Selina Begum, 42, two sons—Shipon, 22, and Hridoy, 18, and daughter Nipu Akter, 13, their hotel staff Saimun Hossain hailing from Nangalkot upazila and auto-rickshaw driver Jamal Hossain, 22, of Laksam upazila in the district.Family’s youngest member Rifat, 8, survived the accident with severe injuries. He was sent to Dhaka Medical College Hospital for better treatment.The bus smashed the CNG-run auto-rickshaw around 12 noon, leaving five passengers of the three-wheeler dead on the spot and four others injured, said Md Badrul Alam Talukdar, officer-in-charge of Lalmai police station.Three of the injured died while undergoing treatment at Baghmara Health Complex.Police recovered the bodies and sent those to Comilla Medical College Hospital morgue.In Dhaka, a man was killed in a road accident at Uttar Badda in the morning.Shahidul Islam, 45, son of late Saidul Islam of Charikumarpara in Kalmakanda upazila of Netrakona district, was hit by an unknown vehicle, said inspector Bachchu Mia at Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) police camp.In Lakshmipur, Ibrahim, son of Abul Khayer of Laxmipur municipality area and an HSC first-year student, was killed as his motorbike fell into a ditch by JB Road in the morning.Md Azizur Rahman, officer-in-charge of Sadar police station, said Ibrahim’s family bought the new motorcycle for him on Saturday afternoon although he was not experienced in driving it.He went out with the motorbike in the morning and it fell into the ditch when he lost control over it, leaving him dead on the spot.On information, police recovered the body and handed it over to the family after a postmortem, the OC added.In Satkhira, a youth – Sagar Hossain, 25, son of Hafi Sardar of Nagarghata village in Patkelghata – was killed in an accident that took place in the district town in the evening.Locals said the deceased along with another youth was riding a motorcycle in the town. At one stage, their motorcycle hit a roadside pillar, leaving the duo critically injured.Being rescued, they were taken to Sadar Hospital where doctors pronounced Sagar dead.Mostafizur Rahman, officer-in-charge of Satkhira Sadar police station, confirmed the incident saying the body was kept at the hospital for autopsy.In Magura, a farmer – Biplab Majumdar, 45, of Nalia village – was killed in head-on collision between a human-hauler and a motorcycle in Shalikha upazila.Tariqul Islam, officer-in-charge of Shalikha police station, said Biplob got tangled between the two vehicles after the collision at Narapati.He was then taken to a local hospital where he succumbed to his injuries, the OC said.Meanwhile, a bus plunged into a roadside ditch in Sadar upazila of Kishoreganj around 3:00pm, leaving 19 passengers injured.According to the Bangladesh Jatri Kalyan Samity, a passengers’ welfare platform, at least 224 people were killed and 886 others injured in 203 road accidents across the country in 12 days before and after the Eid-ul-Azha.The road accidents took place on different national and regional highways from 6 August to 17 August, according to a report prepared by the organisation.Of the total dead and injured, were 37 drivers, 3 transport workers, 70 women, 22 children, 42 students, 3 journalists, 2 physicians, 8 law enforcers, 3 politicians and 900 others pedestrians.Placing the report at a press conference at Dhaka Reporters’ Unity (DRU) in the city, Jatri Kalyan Samity secretary general Mozammel Haque Chowdhury said the number of road crashes and casualties saw a drop during his Eid vacation than that of last year.last_img read more

Shiloh Baptist Church Homecoming and Community Health Fair

first_imgShiloh Baptist Church, located on 1500 9th St. NW Washington, DC, will host their homecoming and community health fair on August 19 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. There will be a variety of activities for all ages with food and music. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page.Shiloh Baptist Church homecoming and Community Health Fairlast_img

From times immemorial

first_imgIndia Tourism Development Corporation (ITDC) took another step to celebrate its glorious past by unveiling – The Ashok – Capital Icon, a coffee table book at The Ashok in the Capital. Compiled as a chronicle, the book was released by Shripad Naik, Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Tourism and Culture who took special pride in unveiling the book. Parvez Dewan, Secretary, Ministry of Tourism and Sameer Sharma, Managing Director, ITDC were present at the ocassion. People from the Ministry of Tourism, other government departments and stakeholders from Travel and Hospitality sector also marked their presence. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Speaking on the occasion, Sameer Sharma said, ‘This is a proud moment for us to revisit all those cherished moments of our glorious history and share them with all of you as priceless treasures.’The book is written by veteran travel writers Hugh and Colleen Gantzer. The book captures the history of the The Ashok from the time of its conceptualisation in the 1955 to the present day. The hard bound compilation captures and at the same time refreshes the timeless moments from the independence era through 500 photographs illustrated in more than 275 pages.   Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe compilation starts from the distant age of the massive supercontinent Gondwanaland, on the far shore of the prehistoric Tethys weaving through the Mughals and the British eras. The book also talks about the post independence period and the origin of The Ashok. ‘The authors have spent a very long period to encompass the vast history of this rich heritage and its each milestone in one chronicle -The Ashok,’ says ITDC.last_img read more