Big Little Lies Adam Scott Making a scene

first_img Jun 14 • The secret screen life of Being Frank star Jim Gaffigan Did you play with a lot of tech when you were a kid? What was your first computer? Scott: You know, my dad and my brother had the very first Apple II and then the Apple IIe, and then the very first Macintosh, which we still have. I don’t even know if it turns on anymore. I think it does. My brother is still in computers. He’s a designer — a programmer — but I was never adept with computers on the level that my father and my brother were. But they were always around, and we would go to … what is the Apple convention up in the Bay Area? I think AirPods are a real game-changer. I just love that they’ve kind of subtly changed my life in a weird way. Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown on voicing a not-always-perfect pig Talking with Chewbacca Post a comment With the entire series in front of you to discover and being a kid, it really expanded my imagination and was influential on my taste for stories and movies and what I found interesting. So I jumped at the chance to be in The Twilight Zone. You play Ed Mackenzie on Big Little Lies. Season 1 is over, and I know you’re doing season 2. What’s the best thing about working on Big Little Lies?  Scott: The cast, the writing and directing. And season 2 is going to be really fun for people. It’s really juicy. Anything else you can say? Scott: I can’t. adam-scott-studio-session-331Scott: “Meeting Mark Hamill was all I wanted as a kid.” Mark Mann You sure? Scott: A hook will come down and pick me up and you’ll never see me again. You also play a demon, named Trevor, on The Good Place. Did you pick that name? Scott: No, no. Mike Schur, who created the show, I believe picked Trevor. If Michael, the Ted Danson character who designed the Good Place, were to design a personal hell just for you, what would it be? Scott: Personal hell built just for me? There would be really loud afternoon TV advertisements playing at all times. Like for insurance, for injury law. It seems like it’s all life insurance, injury law and medications that play during the day, blaring at all times. It would be really hot. There would be no AC. And all the clothing would be really tight and uncomfortable. Now playing: Watch this: Adam Scott is a quiet standout Amazon Tags reading • Big Little Lies’ Adam Scott: Making a scene Apple $144 2:45 See it Aug 28 • In pursuit of perfect ice Mentioned Above Apple AirPods 2019 (Charging Case) TV and Movies See It See It Share your voice Apple Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown: ‘Acting is about reconnecting with a sense of play’ See It 0 Kristen Bell was hosting Jimmy Kimmel’s show and surprised you with a visit from Mark Hamill, whom you once invited to your birthday party when you were a kid. Your face is like the kid who got every birthday wish in their entire life. What was that like? Scott: It was really weird because it was obviously being televised — and to be thrown off guard and surprised like that on camera, with an audience, is very strange and felt Truman Show-y. But really cool. I mean, meeting Mark Hamill was all I wanted as a kid, so it was obviously a big deal. Really cool. He gave you a lightsaber. Scott: He did, yeah. You still have it? Scott: Yeah, it’s cool. You’re in a classic episode of the new remake of The Twilight Zone. Why did you want to do it? Scott: I’m in Nightmare at 30,000 Feet, which is a remake of Nightmare at 20,000 Feet. William Shatner did it in the original series and then John Lithgow did it in Twilight Zone: The Movie in the early ’80s, both of which I’ve seen dozens of times. When we got the script for the new series of The Twilight Zone, I think I said yes before I even read it, which is not what you’re supposed to do. But The Twilight Zone is my favorite show ever. I used to stay up every night because they would play reruns at 11 p.m. every night. I had a 5-inch black-and-white TV in my bedroom. It was the only TV in the house, and I would keep the volume low so my mom wouldn’t know and just watch Twilight Zone every single night. See All Macworld Expo. Scott: We must have gone to that. I kind of grew up watching that evolve, watching Apple grow as a company. I still love their gear, and their gadgets are beautiful and intuitive. So you’re an iPhone user? Scott: Yeah. And I think AirPods are a real game-changer. I just love that they’ve kind of subtly changed my life in a weird way. It keeps you connected, which is both good or bad. It makes being connected effortless. You can stay connected to an audiobook or a podcast or music or whatever it is. It just makes it all easier. I mean, we’ve had headphones and earbuds for years. But these — it’s a brilliant design. I have other Bluetooth headphones from other companies, and none of them are as intuitive as the AirPods, which just blend in with your body. This is all sounding very sci-fi, but it really is a brilliant design. It feels like it’s part of you, in a weird way. I’ve found them to be my favorite Apple product in a long time. star-wars-chewbacca-dollScott had fun playing with this interactive Chewbacca doll. Hasbro Because of that seamlessness? Scott: Yeah, ease of control too. It’s really simple just to double tap. I really love it. I’ve had the Apple Watch now for a few months, and I’m starting to feel the benefits of it. And now I feel weird without it (gesturing to his bare wrist). But the AirPods are … a really simple step up in tech. Some people think they look kind of geeky. They certainly make a statement about who you are when you wear them walking down the street. Scott: So people think they’re too geeky? Because they’re bright white? But that’s good branding. If they’re invisible, then I don’t know. I think they look cool. I think they look beautiful. But I would be anxious to get black ones if they came out with those. That’s a cool idea. You’re not only an actor, you also produce. Are you at all looking at the world of virtual reality or augmented reality? Scott: Not yet. But I think it’s inevitable that everyone will. It seems like things are heading in that direction. But we’ve so far fallen short of integrating it into everyday life and into home entertainment on a grand scale. I’m not sure exactly what it is that’s holding it back from becoming something that everyone kind of just grabs when they’re ready to consume entertainment at home. You guys probably have a better handle on why it hasn’t. Maybe the ultimate set hasn’t landed yet. Yes, some headsets are heavy, uncomfortable. Some people get nauseous, so throwing up kind of gets in the way. Scott: Not the funnest part of being entertained. But I’ve experienced it a few times, and it’s extraordinary. I think it’s just a matter of finding the wearable tech that’s seamless and comfortable, right? That’s the biggest hurdle, I would imagine. Do you have a smart home? Are you into any smart home gear? Scott: I mean, here and there. We haven’t fully jumped into that, mostly because I always feel a little reticent. You always feel like if you commit to something, it’s going to change. And I don’t mind turning on a light switch. We have a [smart] thermostat, and it’s really handy. But I don’t need the entire home to be a smart home — at least not yet. Nightmare at 30,000 FeetIn an episode of the Twilight Zone reboot, Scott plays a nervous passenger who’s convinced his flight is about to crash. Robert Falconer/CBS © 2018 CBS Interactive Self-driving cars: Good idea or bad? Scott: I think they’re a good idea. It’s an exciting idea. And I think in a few years it won’t be dangerous anymore. It’s probably safer than a human driving a car right now. It’s where we’re headed. Whether it’s safe or not, that’s where it’s all going. What tech do you wish had never been invented? Scott: That’s a really good question, but I don’t know. How about tech you’d like to see invented just for you that you haven’t seen? Scott: I still feel like they haven’t perfected the pillow. Because even some of the memory foam ones, they’re — it’s great, but then it’s not. It’s too hot. I feel like the pillow has a way to go, and I’m willing and able to wait, but excited to find the perfect pillow. Best Buy Now playing: Watch this: CNET Magazine It’s easy to see why Adam Scott is often cast as the approachable everyman. He’s pretty low-key in person, with a deadpan delivery that prompts double takes. It’s a persona he’s been able to transform into notable characters he once described as “befuddled beta males.” On NBC’s Parks and Recreation, he embodied Ben Wyatt, a calzone-loving state auditor who dresses up as Batman and owns his encyclopedic knowledge of Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, Star Trek and Game of Thrones. In HBO’s drama series Big Little Lies, he plays Ed Mackenzie, the beleaguered second husband of main character Madeline (Reese Witherspoon), and shows he can stand up to his alpha wife: “Look, I may not be the good-looking adventure ride, OK? But there is something to be said for being there, for being truthful, for being somebody you can steadfastly count on. I will not be anybody’s runner-up.” He’ll return for season 2 of Big Little Lies on June 9 (read our review here). In Jordan Peele’s reboot of the classic sci-fi series The Twilight Zone, which debuted in April on CBS All Access, Scott takes a lead role. (Editors’ note: CBS operates CBS All Access and owns CNET.) He plays a reporter with PTSD who boards a plane and finds an old MP3 player in the seat pocket in front of him. It plays a podcast, which seems to be from the future, about the mystery of the tragic flight he’s on, transforming him into the weirdo who no one will believe is trying to save them from disaster. But right now, Scott has us all smiling. We’ve surprised him with Star Wars collectibles — he’s a huge fan of the sci-fi epic — and he riffs about the interactive Chewbacca doll and talking Yoda mask. Adam Scott: “I’ve just always been a Star Wars fan.” Mark Mann “I feel like everyone in this room was transported to Yoda’s home planet just for a second,” he tells us after trying on the mask. “Don’t worry guys, it’s just me. It’s just a mask. I put a mask on. Everyone relax.” By the time he describes his own personal hell — a nod to his role as Trevor, a rude (but funny) demon, on the NBC comedy series The Good Place — we’re laughing out loud. “Personal hell built just for me? There would be really loud afternoon TV advertisements playing at all times. Like for insurance, for injury law,” he says during our CNET Magazine cover shoot in Los Angeles. “It would be really hot. There would be no AC. And all the clothing would be really tight and uncomfortable.” Fall 2019 MagazineSee more great stories from CNET Magazine. Mark Mann Scott also talked about staying up late watching reruns of The Twilight Zone on his family’s black-and-white TV when he was a kid, how his Apple AirPod wireless headphones have changed his life, and why he thinks there’s an opportunity for someone to reinvent the pillow. Here’s an edited transcript of our conversation. Q: You’re a big Star Wars fan. What’s the appeal? Scott: I guess anyone under the age of 75 is probably a Star Wars fan. It’s been around for so long now. I clearly remember The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi when I was in elementary school, so I really grew up with them. My friends and I were all about Star Wars. It was kind of a rite of passage to collect the figures and make your own lightsabers. I’ve just always been a Star Wars fan. I think I said yes before I even read it, which is not what you’re supposed to do. But The Twilight Zone is my favorite show ever. • $144 3:04 $159 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Apple AirPods 2019 Review • AirPods 2019 review: King of truly wireless earphones crowned with small enhancements $144 CNET Magazinelast_img read more

Tesla bars staff from anonymous chat app after leaks

first_img Tags Tech Industry Car Tech Mobile Apps Roadshow Elon Musk Tesla Share your voice 0 Post a comment Tesla leaks are reportedly leading to employees being barred from using Blind. Nick Miotke/Roadshow Tesla has blocked employees from using anonymous workplace social network app Blind following leaks about the company, Blind has confirmed.Blind has said Tesla is blocking verification emails from its employees’ addresses so they can’t validate their accounts.  “We first found out about this issue through emails from Tesla employees who were trying to sign up on Blind but were not receiving verification emails from us,” Curie Kim from Blind told CNET in an email Tuesday afternoon. “We looked into the verification rates for Tesla and there was a surge in verification failure on our end starting on May 4th, 2019.” “From these facts, we can confirm that Tesla is preventing employees from accessing Blind,” Kim said. She explained it was similar to when Uber blocked Blind usage by employees back in 2017 after whistleblower Susan Fowler spoke up about the Uber working climate. Kim said more employees from more than 40,000 companies are using Blind, including 55,000 Microsoft staffers, 38,000 from Amazon, 16,000 from Google, 13,000 from Facebook, 11,000 from Uber and 10,000 from Apple. “Tesla is the only company that is blocking its own employees from accessing or signing up on Blind,” she said. As spotted earlier by Verdict, a Tesla employee had posted publicly on Blind in May about being unable to use the app.  “Why is Tesla opposed to their employees using Blind? We can’t access the app on the company network,” the post says. “Have to use phone data instead. And it seems they’re blocking emails from Blind too. I told a couple of co-workers about the app but they haven’t been able to receive a verification code to complete the sign-up process!” Variety said Tesla staff are also unable to use Blind via Tesla’s Wi-Fi network. Blind requires users to verify their account with a company email address but then keeps their identity anonymous in order to give “an equitable voice to everyone.” “Through anonymity and community, we aim to flatten corporate hierarchy and remove professional barriers in order to initiate open conversations and create transparency,” Blind says. The app features multiple channels for users: topics channels, private company channels, Tech Lounge and Startup Lounge. Tesla didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Tesla CEO Elon Musk has meanwhile been trying to psyche his employees up to hit delivery targets, reportedly sending out an email last week top push hard while demand is high. Reports say Tesla’s current quarter could eclipse its 90,700 deliveries record. Originally published June 4, 2:18 p.m. PT.   Update, 3:49 p.m.: Adds confirmation from Blind. last_img read more

Productivity and profit improvements depend on where companies place talents Report

first_imgIBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Companies across major sectors can improve performance and productivity by tapping into a more strategic approach to place their employees in the right place, according to report by LinkedIn and Ernest & Young (EY).The report found that most of the organisations are putting right people in the wrong places by concentrating talent in their headquarter country or in legacy locations, rather than establishing a presence in countries with current and future revenue opportunities.”Placing talent where the sector market opportunity is, instead of only the headquarter country or legacy markets can bring substantial gains for companies,” said Sonu Iyer, Tax Partner and People Advisory Services Leader, EY India.Further, the report also found that when company’s workforce is located in places of high market opportunities, profits improve.The report examined 659 firms of varied size and scale and noted that companies headquartered in North America usually achieve higher talent-to-market alignment than those headquartered in Asia and Europe.Companies that increase talent-to-market alignment over time, tend to grow faster.”India has a huge potential to grow and improve its talent-to-market alignment. Further to that, there is scope for firms headquartered in India to improve the match between their workforce and the markets that will drive future growth in top and bottom line,” said Anurag Malik, Partner – People Advisory Services, EY India. In this photo taken on January 10, 2017, start-up companies work out of Nasscom’s Startup Warehouse facility, which incubates start-up tech companies, in Bangalore. [Representational Image]MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP/Getty ImagesThe report also said that it is crucial for global companies to ask the question — where it makes the most sense to establish their workforce.However, at present very few companies have the confidence to recruit more talent from where the market demand is high due to hard costs and organizational drain caused by fragmenting their talent base into multiple locations. 10 tips to optimize your LinkedIn profilecenter_img Closelast_img read more

Another Blow To TRSCare Retired Teachers Are Leaving The System In Droves

first_img Share Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT NewsEarlier this year there were fears that the 32-year old health care system that covers hundreds of thousands of retired teachers was approaching a death spiral. The Teacher’s Retirement System’s TRS-Care was expected to experience a shortfall in excess of $1 billion.Lawmakers came to the rescue with an infusion of cash – a temporary patch intended to shrink the system’s deficit to $700 million. But now, the Austin American-Statesman reports on another threat to the program – retired teachers are leaving it in droves.Statesman Reporter Julie Chang says some 7,800 retired teachers have requested to withdraw from the program’s health insurance coverage. She says more participants leaving could increase health care costs for those who remain, because fewer members would be sharing the cost of health insurance.“Because TRS has such a high unfunded liability, the Texas Legislature, through TRS, has had to make some difficult financial decisions, including making plans that are not as attractive to retired teachers anymore,” Chang says.Chang spoke with a retired Austin teacher whose health premium has gone up 31 percent, to $271 per month. The teacher’s pension of $2,200 per month makes absorbing the increase difficult, Chang says. That’s why the teacher, and others, have sought insurance on the open market.Chang says the situation at TRS-Care is worrying, but that the system is unlikely to collapse anytime soon because legislators are likely to step in to make up the shortfall.“But that’s not to say that in subsequent years, there couldn’t be changes to their health care plans in order to save the state some money,” Chang says.last_img read more