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Canadian filmmakers explore female bonds motherdaughter relationships at TIFF

first_imgTORONTO — For Nicole Dorsey, director and writer of stylistic, psychological drama “Black Conflux,” creating of the film’s main character, Jackie, was about relaying her own experiences as a teenager.“All I wanted as a young person growing up was to see some sort of version of myself on screen,” said Dorsey. “I hope that teenage girls can look at Jackie and just know that they’re not alone…. That you’re going through something that we all have a version of.”The coming-of-age film, which premiers at the Toronto International Film Festival on Friday, centres around the lives of Jackie and Dennis, played by Ella Ballentine and Ryan McDonald. Jackie is a promising high school student determined to avoid becoming like her convict mother. She skips school, parties and hitchikes, trying to navigate her friendships and romantic relationships.“There’s this balance where you are finding power in your sexuality and how to use that and that feels fun and exciting, but you’re also still young and naive and that can be traumatizing when that attention doesn’t turn out to be how you picture it in your mind.”As the film industry makes way for female-led projects in front of and behind the camera, Canadian directors whose works are featured at TIFF this year are using the opportunity to tell stories through complex characters who aren’t necessarily likable, and portray relationships that aren’t reduced to tropes or stereotypes.Whether it be the good, the complicated or the volatile, filmmakers like Dorsey say they want to see themselves and their relationships on screen.The inspiration for Sanja Zivkovic’s debut feature “Easy Land” stemmed from her own experience as an immigrant, she said.The movie follows Jasna, an architect from Serbia played by “Underground” star Mirjana Jokovic, whose mental illness puts a strain on her relationship with her daughter Nina, played by “The Handmaid’s Tale” actress Nina Kiri, as they struggle to navigate obstacles facing newcomers to Canada.Jasna has been traumatized by what she witnessed in Serbia, and the after-effects are exacerbated by the menial jobs she must take to pay the rent.“I spent a lot of time with my mom and it made me think about the past and how hard it was,” said Zivkovic, who came to Canada from Serbia in 1994 during the war in the former Yugoslavia. “It was hard for everyone in my family but specifically for her as a woman who came to Canada barely speaking the language and having to rebuild her own life.”When it came to creating the relationship between Nina and Jasna, Zivkovic said it was important to her to create characters that were dependent on each other. Zivkovic described both characters as outspoken women who cannot express themselves outside their small apartment, but “at home is when everything comes to a climax.”“They’re trying really hard not to hurt each other and trying really hard to play as if it’s not that big of a deal but, of course, they’re both suffering inside and that comes to a surface at certain points in the film,” she said.Amy Jo Johnson’s second feature, “Tammy’s Always Dying,” which stars Felicity Huffman and Anastasia Phillips, also elicits a complicated mother-daughter relationship in a dark comedy that depicts Kathy’s attempt to care for her alcoholic mother, Tammy, who’s been diagnosed with cancer.“There is some obscure humour and I feel like that’s the way I tackle life and look at life — to find the humour within the sadness,” she said.When asked about her interest in the script, written by Joanne Sarazen, Johnson said it reminded her of her own relationship with her parents.Watching her mother die from cancer 20 years ago, Johnson said she saw some of herself in Kathy’s character, which is part of what made the script “jump right off the page.”“The way Joanne wrote the film — with such absurd humour to break through and get through the drama that is within these heavy subjects is what I really, really identified with and grabbed onto as the filmmaker.”Achieving gender parity has become a priority for many Canadian film institutions, including TIFF, which last year pledged a commitment to the 50/50 by 2020 initiative.Out of the 26 Canadian features slated as part of the festival’s lineup, almost 50 per cent are directed by women.Telefilm has also committed to backing female-led projects, recently announcing that 59 per cent of its production funding in the last fiscal year went to projects featuring at least one woman as a lead producer, director or writer.One of those projects touted by Telefilm was Semi Chellas’ “American Woman,” which premiers at TIFF next week. Drawing on Susan Choi’s novel, the film follows Jenny, played by Hong Chau, a dedicated activist who has been living underground for years who is tasked with keeping a group of radicals off the grid while they write a book. Jenny develops a relationship with Pauline, as played by Sarah Gadon, a Patty Hearst-like heiress who has been radicalized by her captors.“What does transpire between them? Is it friendship? Is it love? Is it real? Is it brainwashing? Is all love brainwashing?” Chellas said. “Jenny’s perspective is the centre of the movie, her idea of what it is, but she keeps revising her understanding of how she feels about Pauline and what her responsibility is to that relationship.”Chellas wanted her film to be the opposite of what she sees as a “very glib screenwriting trope” in movies, which is the idea that people can change.“My experience is people very rarely change radically,” said Chellas. “People very rarely change their minds. People very rarely change their habits.”Chellas said she approached the characters’ relationship by developing it between the lines. Certain scenes would first be taped with lines from the script, and then would slowly be re-enacted using fewer and fewer lines.“So much of what they’re communicating to each other necessarily is playing at the level where other people can’t hear it,” said Chellas.Emerald Bensadoun, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Duke Completed A Long Road To The National Championship

When this tournament started, the FiveThirtyEight model said Duke was only 6 percent likely to win the NCAA tournament. Now it’s 100 percent.What the model couldn’t tell you: that Duke would pull away from Gonzaga late in the Elite Eight and demolish a surprising Michigan State team in the Final Four; that it’d have to come back against a Wisconsin team late in the championship game; and that one of the guys helping the Blue Devils do it would be Grayson Allen, the freshman from Jacksonville who scored 16 points in the final of the NCAA tournament. Allen averaged nine minutes and four points a game this season but went 5 of 8 from the field in the biggest game of his life. He’s the kind of folk hero March Madness is so good at finding.That Duke was only 6 percent likely to win the tournament doesn’t mean this was a total shock. The Blue Devils were a No. 1 seed after all and had the sixth-highest probability to win, according to the FiveThirtyEight model. Here’s a look back at the Blue Devils’ win probabilities going into each round of the tournament. Engrave it on to your commemorative DVD, Duke fans. Shining moments shouldn’t be forgotten.Round of 64: 6 percent chance to win the championship.Round of 32: 7 percent.Sweet 16: 12 percent.Elite Eight: 13 percent.Final Four: 22 percent.Finals: 47 percent.Monday night, 11:30 p.m.: 100 percent. read more

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Chocolates chewing gums may harm your digestive system

first_imgA common food additive found in chewing gums, chocolates and breads may significantly reduce the ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and block pathogens, a new study has warned.”Titanium oxide is a common food additive and people have been eating a lot of it for a long time, but we were interested in some of the subtle effects, and we think people should know about them,” said Gretchen Mahler, a professor at the Binghamton University in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”There has been previous work on how titanium oxide nanoparticles affects microvilli, but we are looking at much lower concentrations,” Mahler said.”We also extended previous work to show that these nanoparticles alter intestinal function,” she said.Titanium dioxide is generally recognised as safe by the US Food and Drug administration and ingestion is nearly unavoidable. The compound is an inert and insoluble material that is commonly used for white pigmentation in paints, paper and plastics. It is also an active ingredient in mineral-based sunscreens for pigmentation to block ultraviolet light. However, it can enter the digestive system through toothpastes, as titanium dioxide is used to create abrasion needed for cleaning. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe oxide is also used in some chocolate to give it a smooth texture; in donuts to provide colour; and in skimmed milks for a brighter, more opaque appearance which makes the milk more palatable. A previous study had tested 89 common food products including gum, Twinkies, and mayonnaise and found that they all contained titanium dioxide.About five per cent of products in that study contained titanium dioxide as nanoparticles.”To avoid foods rich in titanium oxide nanoparticles you should avoid processed foods, and especially candy. That is where you see a lot of nanoparticles,” Mahler said. Researchers exposed a small intestinal cell culture model to the physiological equivalent of a meal’s worth of titanium oxide nanoparticles – 30 nanometres across – over four hours (acute exposure), or three meal’s worth over five days (chronic exposure). Acute exposures did not have much effect, but chronic exposure diminished the absorptive projections on the surface of intestinal cells called microvilli.With fewer microvilli, the intestinal barrier was weakened, metabolism slowed and some nutrients – iron, zinc, and fatty acids, specifically – were more difficult to absorb.Enzyme functions were negatively affected, while inflammation signals increased.The study was published in the journal NanoImpact.last_img read more

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