Tag: 爱上海

Arson suspected in Letterkenny fire

first_imgGardaí in Letterkenny are calling on the public to help investigations into a suspected arson on Sunday. The alarm was raised on Sunday afternoon at around 12.50pm.Some furniture was set alight on a spot of wasteland in Killylastin, which is in very close proximity to the Windmill View estate. Gardaí and fire services attended the scene and the blaze was extinguished before it could spread to nearby houses. Gardaí are now appealing to anyone in the area who may have observed the person/s responsible for lighting the fire to contact 074-9167100 or on the Garda Confidential line on 1800 666 111.Antisocial behaviour has been been an issue in this particular area of wasteland, gardaí confirmed.    Arson suspected in Letterkenny fire was last modified: November 26th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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SA Premier Business Awards open for entries

first_img13 January 2014 The second annual South African Premier Business Awards is open for entries, it was announced on Friday. The winners of the awards, which acknowledge excellence across all sectors of South African business, will be announced at a gala ceremony at Johannesburg’s Sandton Convention Centre on 19 March. The event is organised by the Department of Trade and Industry, in partnership with Brand South Africa and Proudly South African. “The awards are designed to showcase the best that South Africa has to offer in terms of businesses, products and services,” Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies said in a statement on Friday. Brand South Africa CEO Miller Matola said Brand South Africa was pleased to be a partner in hosting awards which celebrated South African business entrepreneurship and innovation, as these “are critical in driving the developmental agenda of South Africa and in growing our economy”. The awards cover a range of categories, including export, manufacturing, small business, rural development, technology, green economy, youth entrepreneurship, media, investment, and SME supplier development. There are also awards for women-owned enterprises, Proudly South African enterprises, a Most Empowered Enterprise Award, and a special Play Your Part Award. A Lifetime Achievement Award will also be presented. South African entrepreneur and property developer Richard Maponya was honoured with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the inaugural awards in 2013. Proudly South African CEO Leslie Sedibe said the awards would honour honour enterprises that promote innovation and competitiveness “as well as job creation, good business ethics and quality. “As we celebrate 20 years of democracy this year, we will also celebrate local enterprises that have promoted the spirit of success and entrepreneurship in South Africa.” More information, including entry forms, can be obtained at www.sapremierbusinessawards.co.za. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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3 Advertising Tips from Mad Men – Guest post by Don Draper

first_imgHow has branding evolved since the Mad Men era? Join this free webinar to find out! Date and time: Friday, July 23, 2010 at 1pm ET Reserve your spot now! Topics: This is a guest post by Don Draper, formerly Creative Director at Sterling Cooper and now partner at Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce and star of the AMC hit TV show Mad Men.  Don is also a guest speaker on Mad Men: The Webinar.  (He won’t actually be on the webinar since he’s fictional, but trust us, it will be fun to pretend!)I have been asked to write this guest article to share my advice on marketing and advertising.  From my experience working on many large advertising campaigns for some of the most valued brands on the planet, I can distill the basics down to the following 3 guidelines.  Of course, you really should leave advertising to the professionals at an advertising agency, but perhaps these tips will help you evaluate the agency you are currently working with.Know thy customer.The first step in all great advertising is to know your customer.  What does the customer want, feel and think?  What do they aspire to be?  What is their deepest, most secret desire?  This is the emotion you need to tap into as an ad man.  This Gordon’s Vodka ad taps into the deep aspiration of most men to be strong and independent as well as hip and modern.  What do the man and the hawk have to do with the vodka?  Nothing at all.  That’s not the point.  We’re associating the vodka with being independent, strong, and hip by putting the vodka next to a man who is clearly all of these things because of the visual communication.  Knowing what your customer wants is the first step in great advertising.Image Credit: 1960s AdsBoil down the message.”Make your move” – That is the main message in this Chrysler ad.  The core message here is about individuality, and that buying a Chrysler makes you your own man.  The advertisement could have been a lot more complicated, with different images and trying to convey all the ways that the car helps to feed your desires to be an individual and to be different.  Many ads from earlier in history communicated long and complicated messages using a lot of text.  More modern advertising has shifted to communicating one simple and clear message, essentially associating any product with just one word.Image Credit: 1960s AdsEngage the customer.Using visual images to stand out is important.  The other ads do this quite well – as does this ad from Monroe adding machines.  You would most typically expect this machine to be on the desk of a secretary or accountant inside a somewhat dark office.  However, this ad shows the adding machine outside, against a backdrop of modern skyscrapers and an exceedingly happy secretary.  The images are not expected and engage the customer, encouraging you to look longer and comprehend the deeper message in the advertisement. While times may have changed in terms of how we communicate (I just saw someone making a phone call while walking down the street… fascinating!) the core of knowing your audience and communicating a message succinctly through text and images transcends technology and is at the core of good advertising.I hope you will all join me and HubSpot for Mad Men: The Webinar where we can discuss these issues further.  I am told you will all be able to see my overhead slides and hear my voice, so it should be quite a barn burner.  See you there.Sincerely,Don DraperMad Men: The Webinar Originally published Jul 21, 2010 8:00:00 AM, updated July 03 2013 Guest Blogging Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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Demand Creation vs. Cold Calling

first_img So, why do we take our expensive salespeople and insist they must be good at “cold-calling” when the buyer doesn’t want anything to do with this? Don’t get me wrong. A salesperson needs to be able to communicate in an effective and compelling manner over the phone. The purpose, however, of the communication should not be getting the sale today, but finding potential customers. What other ways have you succesfully created demand for your sales team? What’s stopping you from being successful at demand creation? , a sales and marketing development firm. Here are several practical ways to enable your the salesforce to create demand and eliminate the need to cold call: NetProspex Stop using your salespeople to find potential customers, and start making investments that will help create demand for your sales team and your company. inbound marketing software Cold calling is an exercise in futility and the least efficient way to find potential customers. I’m absolutely amazed at how many pundits and sales consultants recommend this as a viable approach to sustainable demand creation. Focus To Grow Visible Gains Invest in making your top salespeople sought after speakers regarding industry issues. Investments might include enrolling them in the national speakers association training courses, or hiring someone to market your top salespeople as speakers. ) Costs at least 60% more per lead ( HubSpot, The State of Inbound Marketing Harvard Business Review These are horrible statistics for people whose salaries typically cost a company more than $60,000 per year. to build educational video marketing apps that are not like infomercials. ) . -like conference for your industry and feature your best and brightest staff and salespeople in a non-informercial way. Regardless of your executive title, you must realize that the rapid rise of the social web has changed buyers’ expectations. The fact is they do not want to deal with salespeople until they are 70% down the path of the buying process. Since 2007, the Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Eliminate the lowest performers on your sales team and repurpose those resources at the early stages of the sales process to create demand for your company.center_img I’m not saying it doesn’t work, but who would buy a product with the following traits: social web Originally published Jan 17, 2011 4:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 Topics: Invest in crowd-sourced lists with detailed meta-data to target your marketing efforts on the phone and the web. One of my favorite list companies is This is a guest post by Teicko Huber. Teicko is the founder of TED , such as HubSpot, and that attracts buyers to your website. markhillary Invest in tools like Write a series of must-have industry guides your top salespeople can give away.  Has a rate of less than 2% of phone calls resulting in a meeting ( build remarkable content Develop a strategic ) has dramatically shifted power from sellers to buyers. Today’s buyers resist interacting with salespeople until they are good and ready. Invest in Leap Job Marketing and Sales Alignment Doesn’t work 90.9% of the time  ( Photo by: last_img read more

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Inc. 500 Companies Score Better Than 70% of Websites [Data]

first_img , The top 100 averaged a grade of 70. Nova Datacom Inc. 500 list with HubSpot’s Successful companies today are realizing the importance of having an . Originally published Aug 23, 2011 8:00:00 PM, updated July 11 2013 SevOne ymarketing The top 50 on the list averaged a grade of 67. today to find out! , What’s even more interesting is that HubSpot customers who made the list — Here are some specific data points: , — received an average score of 91. Marketing Takeaway that HubSpot made it onto the Inc. 500 Fastest Growing Companies List. Because data and analytics are in our blood, we thought it would be interesting to see what would happen when we analyzed the companies on the Grade your website Source Consulting As a marketer, UnitedLexcenter_img , , and , Overall the average of companies on the list is 70, which means that, on average, this year’s Inc. 500 companies score better than 70% of all websites scored by Website Grader. , TicketLeap ServiceNow Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack need to be leveraging inbound marketing, too. How does your company fare? you Website Grader We came up with some interesting results. Overall, the main takeaway from the data is that the companies on the list score better than companies in general. we announced effective web presence Neutron Interactive AppAssure Software , 160 of the 500 companies (32%) scored in the top 10% of all websites. They earned a Website Grade over 90. This morning, that takes advantage of inbound marketing strategies such as SEO, blogging and content creation, social media, landing pages, etc. From our analysis of the data we’ve gathered from Website Grader, it’s obvious that the companies on the Inc. 500 list understand the importance of inbound marketing as well. (Note: The websites for highlighted companies did not return a report in Website Grader.)last_img read more

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A Marketer’s Guide to Understanding Statistical Significance

first_imgHave you ever presented results from a marketing campaign and been asked “But are these results statistically significant?” If you were feeling snarky, you might have responded “Well, the results are different from what we saw before. Isn’t that significant?”All kidding aside, as data-driven marketers, we’re not only asked to measure the results of our marketing campaigns, but also to demonstrate the validity of the data.Free Download: A/B Testing Guide and KitJust recently, I had a call with a customer asking that exact thing. The two marketers had each created a version of a landing page and used HubSpot’s A/B testing functionality to collect the results. They had a friendly wager over which one would win. After a few days, they had the results; one had a slightly higher conversion rate, but they were left wondering if the results were statistically significant. (I’m going to guess that it was the person with the lower conversion rate that asked this question.) I love a little friendly competition — my family still tells the story about how I challenged my brother to an apple-peeling contest just to “make things interesting” one Thanksgiving. Needless to say, I was happy to help settle this bet.While there are a number of free tools out there to calculate statistical significance for you (HubSpot even has one here), in order to truly understand what these tools are telling you, it’s helpful to understand what they’re calculating and what it means. We’ll geek out on the numbers using a specific example below to help you understand statistical significance. How to Calculate Statistical Significance1. Determine What You’d Like to TestFirst, decide what you’d like to test. This could be comparing conversion rates on two landing pages with different images, click-through rates on emails with different subject lines, or conversion rates on different call-to-action buttons at the end of a blog post. The number of choices are endless. My advice would be to keep it simple; pick a piece of content that you want to create two different variations of and decide what your goal is — a better conversion rate or more views are good places to start.You can certainly test additional variations or even create a multivariate test, but for the purpose of this example, we’ll stick to two variations of a landing page with the goal being increasing conversion rates. If you’d like to learn more about A/B testing and multivariate tests, check out “The Critical Difference Between A/B and Multivariate Tests.”2. Start Collecting Your DataNow that you’ve determined what you’d like to test, it’s time to start collecting your data. Since you’re likely running this test to determine what piece of content is best to use in the future, you’ll want to pull a sample size. For a landing page, that might mean picking a set amount of time to run your test (e.g. make your page live for 3 days). For something like an email, you might pick a random sample of your list to randomly send variations of your emails to. Determining the right sample size can be tricky, and the right sample size will vary between each test. As a general rule of thumb, you want the expected value for each variation to be greater than 5. (We’ll cover expected values further down.)3. Calculate Chi-Squared ResultsThere are a number of different statistical tests that you can run to measure significance based on your data. Determining which is the best one to use depends on what you’re trying to test and what type of data you’re collecting. In most cases, you’ll use a Chi-Squared test since the data is discrete. Discrete is a fancy way of saying that there are a finite number of results that can be produced. For example, a visitor will either convert or not convert; there aren’t varying degrees of conversion for a single visitor.Before I start collecting data, I find it helpful to state my hypothesis at the beginning of the test and determine the degree of confidence I want to test. Since I’m testing out a landing page and want to see if one performs better, my hypothesis is that there is a relationship between the landing page the visitors receive and their conversion rate. You can test based on varying degrees of confidence (sometimes referred to as the alpha of the test). If you want the requirement for reaching statistical significance to be high, the lower your alpha will be. You may have seen statistical significance reported in terms of confidence. For example, “The results are statistically significant with 95% confidence.” In this scenario, the alpha was .05 (confidence is calculated as 1 minus the alpha), meaning that there’s a one in 20 chance of making an error in the stated relationship.After I’ve collected the data, I put it in a chart to make it easy to organize. Since I’m testing out 2 different variations (A and B) and there are 2 possible outcomes (converted, did not convert), I’ll have a 2×2 chart. I’ll total each column and row so I can easily see the results in aggregate.Now, I’ll calculate what the expected values are. In the example above, if there was no relationship between what landing page visitors saw and their conversion rate, we would expect to see the same conversion rates with both version A and version B. From the totals, we can see that 1,945 people converted out of the 4,935 total visitors, or roughly 39% of visitors. To calculate the expected frequencies for each version of the landing page assuming there’s no difference, we can multiply the row total for that cell by the column total for that cell, and divide it by the total number of visitors. In this example, to find the expected value of conversion on version A, I would use the following equation: (1945*2401)/4935 = 946To calculate Chi-Square, I compare the observed frequencies to the expected frequencies. This comparison is done by subtracting the observed from the expected, squaring the result, and then dividing it by the value of the expected frequency. Essentially, I’m trying to see how different my actual results are from what we might expect. Squaring the difference amplifies the effects of the difference, and dividing by what’s expected normalizes the results. The equation looks like this: (expected – observed)^2)/expectedI then sum the four results to get my Chi-Square number. In this case, it’s .95. To see whether or not the conversion rates for my landing pages are different with statistical significance, I compare this with the value from a Chi-Squared distribution table based on my alpha (in this case, .05) and the degrees of freedom. Degrees of freedom is based on how many variables you have. With a 2×2 table like in this example, the degrees of freedom is 1. In this case, the Chi-Square value would need to be equal or exceed 3.84 for the results to be statistically significant. Since .95 is less than 3.84, my results are not statistically different. This means that there is not a relationship between what version of landing page a visitor receives and conversion rate with statistical significance.Why Statistical Significance Is SignificantYou may be asking yourself why this is important if you can just use a free tool to run the calculation. Understanding how statistical significance is calculated can help you determine how to best test results from your own experiments. Many tools use a 95% confidence rate, but for your experiments, it might make sense to use a lower confidence rate if you don’t need the test to be as stringent. Understanding the underlying calculations also helps you explain why your results might be significant to people who aren’t already familiar with statistics.If you’d like to download the spreadsheet I used in this example so you can see the calculations on your own, click here.Image credit: Caitlinator Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack A/B Testing Originally published Apr 12, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated October 29 2019last_img read more

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3 Real-Life Examples of Incredibly Successful A/B Tests

first_img A/B Testing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Whether you’re looking to increase revenue, sign-ups, social shares, or engagement, A/B testing and optimization can help you get there. But for many marketers out there, the tough part about A/B testing is often finding the right test to drive the biggest impact — especially when you’re just getting started.So, what’s the recipe for high-impact success?Truthfully, there is no one-size-fits-all recipe. What works for one business won’t work for another — and vice versa.Free Download: A/B Testing Guide and Kit But just because you can’t replicate the same test and expect the same result doesn’t mean you can’t get inspired by other companies’ tests. As a content marketer Optimizely, I’ve chatted with many testers about their successful (and not so successful) A/B tests. In this post, I’ll outline three of my favorite high-impact testing stories from Electronic Arts (EA), Upworthy, and comScore. While the same tests may not get you the same results, they can get you inspired to run creative tests of your own.Electronic ArtsTheir Goal: Increase RevenueSimCity 5, one of EA’s most popular video games, sold 1.1 million copies in the first two weeks of its launch last year. 50% of sales were digital downloads, thanks to a strong A/B testing strategy.The OriginalAs EA prepared to release the new version of SimCity, they released a promotional offer to drive more game pre-orders. The offer was displayed as a banner across the top of the pre-order page — front-and-center for shoppers. But according to the team, the promotion was not driving the increase in pre-orders they had expected.They decided to test some other options to see what design or layout would drive more revenue.The VariationOne variation removed the promotional offer from the page altogether. The test lead to some very surprising results: The variation with no offer messaging whatsoever drove 43.4% more purchases. Turns out people really just wanted to buy the game — no extra incentive necessary.Most people believe that direct promotions drive purchases, but for EA, this turned out to be totally false. Testing gave them the information needed to maximize revenue in a way that would not have been otherwise possible.UpworthyGoal: Boost Engagement or Social SharesViral video site Upworthy has built a thriving media business on optimization. From day one, the media company has tested everything — from headlines to content to site functionality — to ensure the site meets the unique (and changing) needs of its audience. The OriginalAs Upworthy’s audience grew, the team realized that the site’s design with its strong emphasis on social sharing was not keeping up with the needs of frequent visitors. Users wanted to dig deeper, but there was no obvious way to get to a second piece of content.Typically, sites with recommended and related content modules have higher visitor engagement. The Upworthy team knew this, but worried recommended content modules would detract from the site’s primary goal of social sharing. But being that data-driven folks they are, they decided to test it out before making a final decision.The VariationThey experimented with several different placements and designs of a recommended content module, measuring the impact on engagement and social shares across Upworthy’s site.After running the test for just a few days, the Upworthy team uncovered some surprising results. The top performing recommended content module actually increased social sharing by 28%! It also dramatically improved the entire site’s engagement.The decision was easy: Upworthy quickly built the new recommended content functionality into each content page on their site. By letting their users make the final call, the team was able to build a truly optimized experience that both expanded Upworthy’s offerings and increased conversions.comScoreGoal: Generate More LeadsMarketers generally agree that when you’re selling a product, social proof can have a positive impact on sales. In fact, most of us are doing it already. So how do you turn a commonly-used strategy and turn it into a competitive advantage? By optimizing it, of course.The OriginalComScore ran an experiment on their product pages to accomplish just that. Their original product pages displayed the minimum viable product for social proof: a customer quote. However, the quote was mixed among other content and displayed on a less-than-eye-catching grey background. The VariationsThe team experimented with different designs and orientations, plus the addition of a customer logo, to see if a different visual treatment would make their social proof convert more visitors into leads.They tested 2,500 visitors in the experiment and soon saw that Variation 1 was the winner, outperforming all other variations and beating the control by a wide margin. Using a vertical layout with the client logo displayed prominently on top of the testimonial increased the conversion rate of the product pages by 69% compared to the original.Now, It’s Your TurnThese companies all saw these amazing results because they started testing. If you want to get the same results, you’ve got to get started, too. For more information, be sure to check out the on-demand webinar “Optimize Your Online Marketing Channels,” hosted by Optimizely and HubSpot.If you have any questions, share them in the comments below! We’re here to help. Originally published Oct 1, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated October 29 2019 Topics:last_img read more

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Pinterest Announces Buyable Pins

first_imgWe’ve all heard the rumors, but yesterday it was confirmed. Pinterest announced that Buyable Pins are coming in the next few weeks. For consumers, this simplifies the steps from pinning to purchase. For ecommerce, Buyable Pins could change the way that people shop. Here’s a quick rundown on Buyable Pins and how they affect you, both as a consumer and a business.How Does it Work for Consumers?Next to the red “Pin it” button, there will be a blue “Buy it” button on pins. Any product with the blue “Buy it” button will be available for purchase, directly from Pinterest. Consumers can filter by price and see different color and size options right on the pin. Then, when they’re ready to checkout, all they have to do is click the “Buy it” button and pay with Apple Pay or a credit card. Pinterest is working with payment processors and Apple Pay, so that the consumers’ credit card information is secure.This is initially being rolled out in the U.S. on iPhones and iPads. Desktop and Android users will have to wait for future releases to be able to “Buy it.”How Can Your Business Get Involved?For the launch, Pinterest anticipates having more than 2 million buyable pins available by partnering with retailers like Macy’s, Neiman Marcus, and Nordstrom, as well as companies on the Demandware and Shopify commerce platforms.If you’re a Shopify user, you just need to add the Pinterest channel. If you’re a Demandware user, you need to contact your customer success manager. Not on Shopify or Demandware but eager to get involved? Pinterest has started a waitlist for businesses to sign up to be notified when future integrations are launched. What Does This Mean as a Consumer?For consumers, Pinterest has long been a place to keep track of shopping lists. Buyable Pins make it easier to go immediately from pin to purchase, removing the intermediate steps of trying to find the item online.Additionally, the checkout process is natively built for mobile. Once a consumer has set up their personal information, Pinterest will store it. We’ve all struggled with typing in credit card information on our mobile device before, so this removes that pain point.What Does This Mean for Your Business and Ecommerce? Unlike Facebook’s and Twitter’s buy buttons, the Pinterest “Buy it” option is more likely to disrupt ecommerce. Simply, Pinterest is a platform where people go with the intention to consume, whether they’re interested in recipes or DIY. The “Buy it” button streamlines the process for shoppers already pinning things to buy on Pinterest. Additionally, the checkout process is built for mobile, which reduces friction and shopping cart abandonment on mobile devices.Notably for businesses, Pinterest isn’t taking a percentage of transactions like most other ecommerce platforms. If your business fulfills the criteria, you can get set up with the “Buy it” button at no charge. However, this means that placement on Pinterest will become more critical to convert pins to purchases. Promoted Pins have prime placement, so they’re likely to generate more revenue from the “Buy it” button. And, as brands vie for positions on the platform, they’re more likely to generate revenue for Pinterest. Finally, with Buyable Pins, businesses also handle shipping and customer service themselves. This ensures that the Pinterest channel fits seamlessly into existing ecommerce logistics.What do you think about Buyable Pins? What do you think this means for consumers and ecommerce? Share with us in the comments! Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Pinterest Marketing Originally published Jun 3, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics:last_img read more

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Why Your Memory Sucks: The Science of Remembering in the Internet Age

first_imgTake a second and think about the three most important people in your life.Got ’em? Okay, now here’s a quiz: Do you know all three of their phone numbers off the top of your head?If you don’t, you’re not alone. Why waste brain space memorizing phone numbers when you can look them up on your cell phone whenever you want, right?Not too long ago, we used to outsource information we didn’t know to friends and family. Instead of remembering the information ourselves, we’d remember who knows what. Dad knows how to change a tire; Rob knows all the baseball stats; Caroline knows how to get to Grandma’s house.Now, we outsource memory to technology and the internet. The answer to any question in the world is only a Google search away. Our smartphones, our emails, WikiHow — they’ve all become a part of our external hard drive.But that reliance on the internet and less on our own memory isn’t just changing our lifestyles. It’s actually changing the structure of our brains.We’ve changed the way we take in new information. Our attention spans have become shorter. The massive amounts of information we expose ourselves to forces us to be more efficient about what we convert to long-term memories.Has memory become obsolete thanks to the ubiquity of the internet? Let’s take a look how our dependence on technology and the internet has affected our brains and how we think, learn, and remember.How We Make MemoriesTo understand how technology is changing how we make memories, let’s take a quick look at how we make memories in the first place.Every time you learn a fact or have an experience, this information enters your working memory, also known as your short-term memory.Your working memory is a fragile place. A new piece of information lives in there for only about 60 milliseconds before it’s either forgotten, or it moves to your long-term memory system.What determines its survival? Sometimes, it’s your own decision, whether conscious or unconscious: You decide whether the information is noteworthy or relevant enough to warrant becoming a long-term memory. Other times, a simple break in your attention can make you forget it.Only when facts and experiences enter your long-term memory can you weave them into more complex, big-picture ideas — a process that’s a trademark of our depth of intelligence, argues WIRED’s Nicholas Carr.It’s that jump from short-term to long-term memory that can be most profoundly affected by our digital lifestyle.Why? For one, because our working memories can get overloaded with more information than our brains can handle; and secondly, because we’ve trained ourselves to trivialize the information we learn online in the first place.Information OverloadWhen we go online to learn things, we often end up exposing ourselves to more information than our brain can possibly process and store.Ever found yourself in one of those Wikipedia black holes, where you go in looking up the name of a Russian prime minister and emerge, hours later, having read through the entire history of the Russian Revolution?That leads to what’s called “cognitive overload.” It can also happen when you go online look up the name of that Russian prime minister and end up also reading your emails, scrolling through your Twitter feed, and skimming through a few articles within the same time frame.All this activity online is an interactive process that requires a lot of quick decision-making. This is why neuroimaging studies have shown frequent internet users have extensive brain activity when actively surfing the internet.But that’s not necessarily a good thing. All the skimming we do and the notifications we receive while spending time online can easily lead to cognitive overload. When the amount of information entering our working memory exceeds our ability to process and store it, we have trouble retaining that information in our long-term memory or drawing connections with other memories.”Our ability to learn suffers, and our understanding remains weak,” writes Carr.A Different Type of MemoryThe 2011 study “Google Effects on Memory: Cognitive Consequences of Having Information at Our Fingertips” found that people who have access to search engines tend to remember fewer facts and less information overall because they know they can find the answer easily using the internet.In other words, when faced with a question we don’t know the answer to, we’ve conditioned ourselves not to recall the information itself, and not to stretch our memories to figure out the answer — but instead, to remember how to find the answer using a search engine.It still means we have to remember things, it just means we’re remembering a different type of thing. We’re remembering how to find the information — best practices for online search queries, the websites that might have the best answers, clues for verifying a reputable source. It’s kind of like the use of calculators in the classroom: Students are expected to do less rote memorization and are trained more on how to find the answers to complex questions.”The internet has become a primary form of external or transactive memory, where information is stored collectively outside ourselves,” reads the study. However, that does mean we’ve trained our brains to treat online information as trivial and less worthy of our undivided attention. Each time we check email or Facebook or the news, we prepare ourselves for skimming, not for learning. In a way, we’ve conditioned ourselves to forget the information before we even read it. Our brains are less apt to focus, digest information, and convert it into our long-term memory. Instead, we have an increasing appetite for more stimuli.Adapting to Our New RealityThe folks at Academic Earth put it best: “If the goal is to forge a creative mind through critical thinking, our Google amnesia may be problematic.” Like Carr said, the human ability to translate memories into complex thinking and analysis is part of what makes us uniquely intelligent.But it’s not like we’re losing the ability to think critically altogether. Frequent internet usage is our new reality, and the answer isn’t to turn it off or blame the kids — it’s to adapt so we can lessen any negative impacts on converting facts and experiences to long-term memory.Put simply, we’ll need to teach ourselves how to consciously prioritize information so we can process — and I mean deeply process — the most important stuff.But how? Just as we’ve trained ourselves to trivialize online information, we can also train ourselves to consciously commit information to memory.Repetition is one way to remember things more easily. When you do or read something once, a neurological pathway is created in your brain. When you repeat that action and experience the same reward again, that neurological pathway gets a little bit thicker; and the next time, even thicker. The thicker that pathway gets, the more implicit recalling it becomes. That’s why re-reading important articles, for instance, can be a helpful way to process and store the information in them.Another tip? Removing the interruptions that can break your attention and make you forget things stored in your short-term memory to begin with. This means closing our email and turning off notifications when we’re working. (Or even when we’re reading our favorite newspaper.)The ubiquity of the internet — and its effects on the way we think and how are brains are wired — can be overwhelming at times. Not to mention, a little creepy.“We become part of the internet in a way. We become part of the system and we end up trusting it,” said Daniel Wegner, the UCLA psychology professor who headed the “Google Effects on Memory” study.So, how will our brains continue to develop as a result of technology and the internet? I’m sure we’ll see much more research on our dependence on (and even interdependence with) technology in the years ahead. Originally published Aug 18, 2015 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Marketing Psychology Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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Are You Making as Much as Your Marketing Peers? Use This Tool to Find Out

first_img Topics: Have you ever wondered how much other marketers out there are making?What about the marketers working right alongside you? How much are they making? More than you?While discussing salaries is kind of a taboo subject in the U.S., it’s perfectly normal to be curious about how your salary compares to that of other marketers. (Trust me, we think about it too.)And although we can’t answer those questions directly for you, we have come up with a way to get a general sense of how your salary stacks up. Introducing the Marketing Salary GraderHubSpot’s Marketing Salary Grader makes its calculations using self-reported data collected from marketers across the country.By cross-referencing your salary with criteria including years of experience, education level, and company size, we can show you what percentile your salary puts you in compared to marketers with similar characteristics.These salary “grades” are adjusted based on location to account for geographic salary variances. This puts everyone on a more even playing field, since the same salary can be considered more or less valuable depending on an area’s cost of living.That being said, salary grading is not an exact science. When you’re exploring the tool, keep in mind that it was created for your amusement and to pique your curiosity.What do you think about the new Marketing Salary Grader tool? Let us know in the comments section below.  Originally published Oct 15, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Marketing Jobs Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

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