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Trains carrying Shiv Sainiks caused a worry for Maharashtra, UP CMs

first_imgChief Ministers of Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh mulled over some tense moments before eventually permitting the departure of two special trains ferrying 3,000 Shiv Sainiks to Ayodhya last week. Sources said the U.P. government had conveyed its reservations over thousands of Sainiks shouting ‘Har Hindu ka yahi pukar, pehle mandir phir sarkar’ entering its jurisdiction, possibly leading to serious law and order issues. Reacting to the concerns, General Manager of the Central Railways D.K. Sharma had to call off the train journeys just an hour before departure from Thane and Nasik stations. It was only when CM Devendra Fadnavis spoke to his counterpart Yogi Adityanath that the trains were allowed to depart with a special unit of intelligence sleuths of the Government Railway Police on board until Igatpuri, the last major junction before crossing over to Madhya Pradesh, sources said. “The Maharashtra Chief Minister wanted to know on the basis of which intelligence inputs the CR cancelled the trains. He was worried a cancellation could lead to political chaos in the State. When no written proof could be produced, it was cordially agreed to allow the trains to proceed,” said a source. “Cancelling the trains would have been a political nightmare,” he added. Mr. Sharma said all due process were followed while issuing permissions and he did not have any fear of the law and order situation.“We had some basic concerns that were raised with the higher-ups. The due procedures were followed. How can I cancel a train for which prior booking has been made? As a routine ritual, I had only apprised superiors, including the Chief Minister and the honourable Railway Minister of the procedures followed,” Mr. Sharma told The Hindu.At the Thane station, the saffron contingent waited anxiously for clearances while the train was on hold for 30 minutes. The U.P. government had informed a delegation of Sena leaders that maintaining law and order for two sensitive events, Sena’s and the Vishwa Hindu Parishad’s Dharma Sansad, was nearly impossible. “The General Manager of the Central Railway was under pressure from the U.P. Government. We spent some very tense moments,” said Sanjay More, member of the Shiv Sena’s Ayodhya organising committee.Officials said the Railway rules permit bookings for unscheduled trains six months prior to the journey, but the two empty rakes were reserved a month before by Shiv Sena MP Rajan Vichare and Eknath Shinde. The first of the two trains departed from Thane at 1.50 pm on November 22, with 1,600 sainiks onboard in the 21 coaches – one 3 tier AC and 20 sleeper class. It arrived in Ayodhya late on November 23 night. The GRP had kept intense bandobast in anticipation of the crowds but sources said they decided looking at the situation to board along with an intelligence wing until Igatpuri. The Nasik train left at 1.30 am on November 23 and had 15 coaches — one 3 tier AC and 14 sleeper class — and reached early morning on November 24, officials said.last_img read more

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3 Advertising Tips from Mad Men – Guest post by Don Draper

first_imgHow has branding evolved since the Mad Men era? Join this free webinar to find out! Date and time: Friday, July 23, 2010 at 1pm ET Reserve your spot now! Topics: This is a guest post by Don Draper, formerly Creative Director at Sterling Cooper and now partner at Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce and star of the AMC hit TV show Mad Men.  Don is also a guest speaker on Mad Men: The Webinar.  (He won’t actually be on the webinar since he’s fictional, but trust us, it will be fun to pretend!)I have been asked to write this guest article to share my advice on marketing and advertising.  From my experience working on many large advertising campaigns for some of the most valued brands on the planet, I can distill the basics down to the following 3 guidelines.  Of course, you really should leave advertising to the professionals at an advertising agency, but perhaps these tips will help you evaluate the agency you are currently working with.Know thy customer.The first step in all great advertising is to know your customer.  What does the customer want, feel and think?  What do they aspire to be?  What is their deepest, most secret desire?  This is the emotion you need to tap into as an ad man.  This Gordon’s Vodka ad taps into the deep aspiration of most men to be strong and independent as well as hip and modern.  What do the man and the hawk have to do with the vodka?  Nothing at all.  That’s not the point.  We’re associating the vodka with being independent, strong, and hip by putting the vodka next to a man who is clearly all of these things because of the visual communication.  Knowing what your customer wants is the first step in great advertising.Image Credit: 1960s AdsBoil down the message.”Make your move” – That is the main message in this Chrysler ad.  The core message here is about individuality, and that buying a Chrysler makes you your own man.  The advertisement could have been a lot more complicated, with different images and trying to convey all the ways that the car helps to feed your desires to be an individual and to be different.  Many ads from earlier in history communicated long and complicated messages using a lot of text.  More modern advertising has shifted to communicating one simple and clear message, essentially associating any product with just one word.Image Credit: 1960s AdsEngage the customer.Using visual images to stand out is important.  The other ads do this quite well – as does this ad from Monroe adding machines.  You would most typically expect this machine to be on the desk of a secretary or accountant inside a somewhat dark office.  However, this ad shows the adding machine outside, against a backdrop of modern skyscrapers and an exceedingly happy secretary.  The images are not expected and engage the customer, encouraging you to look longer and comprehend the deeper message in the advertisement. While times may have changed in terms of how we communicate (I just saw someone making a phone call while walking down the street… fascinating!) the core of knowing your audience and communicating a message succinctly through text and images transcends technology and is at the core of good advertising.I hope you will all join me and HubSpot for Mad Men: The Webinar where we can discuss these issues further.  I am told you will all be able to see my overhead slides and hear my voice, so it should be quite a barn burner.  See you there.Sincerely,Don DraperMad Men: The Webinar Originally published Jul 21, 2010 8:00:00 AM, updated July 03 2013 Guest Blogging Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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2 Smart Reasons to Put Content Behind Forms [Marketing Cast]

first_img Lead Generation We’ve previously argued David Meerman Scott, traditionally an opponent of content gates, recognizes that in some cases, forms can make sense for a website. In this episode of the Weekly Marketing Cast , we discuss in exactly which instances forms should be used. 1. Secondary Offers “I think almost always putting a gate in front of your content is not a good idea,” says David. “However, there are times when a form does make sense,” he adds. For instance, one is when you include a secondary call-to-action within your initial offer.Let’s say you write an ebook, and in it you mention a sales consultation about your product or service. This mention should be accompanied with a link that takes the visitor to a form on a landing page . In that way, you know your leads are going to be educated and more qualified for your company. 2. Qualifying Existing Prospects Another benefit of having a form is to help you identify which of your existing contacts are more sales-ready. For example, when you send content behind a form to your email list, you can find out which people are most interested in what you have to offer.While most of the time you don’t want to have gates in front of your content, David says, there are a couple of times when you do want them. Do you agree? Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Aug 29, 2011 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016last_img read more

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5 Best Practices for Website A/B Testing

first_imgAs a marketer, A/B tests and multivariate testing are a great way for your business to optimize web pages and generate more leads and conversions. They allow you to figure out which elements of your marketing are working and which ones can be improved upon.Here are 5 best practices to keep in mind when conducting A/B testing on your website:1. Keep It Simple; Then Get More AdvancedAlthough some people are really good at A/B testing, there is always some skill involved with testing some of your website’s more complex features. Instead, start your A/B testing with something simple, like moving your registration form to the left of the page instead of the right. Then, as you start to understand the A/B testing process, you can start conducting more sophisticated experiments. For example, WikiJob decided to conduct an A/B test by adding something simple — testimonials — to one of its pages to see if they increased conversions. As a result, the web page including testimonials performed 34% better in sales than the web page without them.2. Understand That a Minor Change Can Lead to a Significant ResultSomething as simple as changing the text in the bullet points on your web page can increase your conversions. People sometimes think that big, sweeping changes need to occur in an A/B test. The truth is, the details of the page are just as important. Remember that something simple can still drive big improvements.3. Test 1 Variable on a Page, But Don’t Limit Yourself to one VariableIn order to see if a feature on a page is working effectively or not, you have to isolate it in your A/B test. Test one item at a time, but remember that your web pages are also made up of a number of other features. You don’t have to limit yourself just to testing color background or text size. Think also about your images, videos, language, bullet points, and headlines, to name a few.4. Always Be TestingYour first A/B test may have been a huge success, helping you discover a new way to make your web page more effective. However, there’s always room for more optimization on your website. Try conducting an A/B test on another feature of that same page. For example, you can test for headlines, body copy, color schemes, images, adding features, etc. Then move onto another page of your site, and do some testing there. There’s a pretty good chance you can still increase conversion rates and leads elsewhere, too.5. Don’t Give Up, Even if a Test Isn’t SignificantYou may decide to conduct an A/B test on the headline for a web page but see no statistically significant result to persuade you to run with one page over the other. Don’t think your A/B test failed. Use the failed data to help you figure out a new iteration on your new test. For example, consider testing new headlines, and see if that makes a difference. If not, the headline may have no bearing, but there may be another feature of your page you can adjust to increase leads. For example, try switching up your call-to-action button, and see if that makes a significant difference.What other lessons do you think marketers should keep in mind when doing A/B testing? Originally published Sep 26, 2011 1:00:00 PM, updated June 28 2019 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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The Marketing Industry According to Google Autocomplete

first_imgYou know when you’re so close to another person that they literally finish your sentences for you? Well, Google’s kinda like that person for all of us. When we have a question or are searching for information, Google tries to guess what we’re searching for before we even finish typing out our query.While the search engine’s dedication and devotion is unmatched, its Autocomplete suggestions are not always on the money. Sometimes, they’re hilarious. Sometimes, they’re puzzling. Other times, they’re just downright depressing. But most of the time, they offer an interesting look at what people think about a certain search query. So we decided to run a little experiment to see how Google Autocomplete feels about marketing today. Warning: The results are sometimes funny, sometimes disheartening, and sometimes NSFW. But we won’t spoil them for you. Check ’em out below.Marketing and Advertising According to Google Autocomplete1) Marketing is …2) Advertising is …3) Marketers are …Really, there’s an entire pdf about marketers being liars?4) Advertisers are …Blogging and Bloggers According to Google Autocomplete1) Blogging is …2) Bloggers are …3) Bloggers should …4) Blogging is for …5) CTAs are …Google doesn’t have time for CTAs, because CATS.6) Landing pages are …Social Media According to Google Autocomplete1) Social media is …2) Social media is for …3) Facebook is …4) Facebook is for …5) Facebook should …6) Facebook ads are …7) Twitter is …8) Twitter is for …9) Twitter should …10) LinkedIn is …11) Pinterest is …12) Pinterest is for …A Taste of Its Own Medicine: Google According to Google Autocomplete1) Google is …2) Google is for …3) Google should …4) Google will …Which of these autocompletes most surprised you?  Originally published Jun 24, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Marketing Trendslast_img read more

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How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Social Selling [Infographic]

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Dec 7, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 This post originally appeared on the Sales section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe to Sales.Social selling is part activity, part reputation. If you’re writing insightful comments on your prospects’ blogs, responding to their tweets, and liking their shared content, you’ve got the activity bit down pat. But if your LinkedIn profile doesn’t include your three jobs and features a cropped picture of you from prom, you can’t really call yourself a social seller. If you’d like to start a social selling initiative in earnest, then begin by revamping your LinkedIn profile. Just as you’re researching potential buyers on LinkedIn to learn more about them, they’re looking at your profile to judge whether they want to do business with you. Don’t ruin great messaging and positive interactions with an outdated, sparse, or inappropriate profile. So, what exactly should your LinkedIn profile look like? We’ve put together an infographic that breaks down the ideal social selling LinkedIn profile, section by section. Stride into 2015 with social selling style.Click here to tweet this infographic!Click image to enlarge.Save Save Enjoy this post? To read more content like it, subscribe to the Sales Blog. Topics: Social Sellinglast_img read more

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10 Ways to Increase Conversions Using Psychology [Infographic]

first_img Originally published Jan 2, 2015 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 734Save The best marketers I know are always on the lookout for clever hacks and tools to increase their conversion rates. They’re the ones to jump on Snapchat, or experiment with animated GIFs in email, or hack together a parallax scrolling landing page. The best marketers I know also understand that these new tools and ingenious hacks don’t always pan out. Sometimes, jumping on the latest trends doesn’t make a dent in your conversion rates, no matter how well you’ve implemented them.So to make sure they’re hitting their goals every month, top marketers will optimize their marketing based on something that’s been around for a while now: human behavior. They read up on what makes people tick — and adjust their marketing accordingly. Thanks to Help Scout, getting up to speed on the most important research in psychology is easy. In the infographic below, they’ve curated and summed up some smart, science-backed tips for increasing your conversions. Check it out!734Save Conversion Rate Optimizationcenter_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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Magazines and Social Media: From the News Stand to the News Feed

first_img20SaveInterested in learning more about which social networks are right for your publication? Take a look at our social media suggestions for media companies, and let us know where you dedicate your social efforts in the comments below.  Social Media Marketing For the most part, publishers no longer question the merit of dedicating time and effort to social media. Time and time again Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and other social platforms have proven their worth for everything for content distribution, audience engagement, and more. That said, simply reposting every article you publish and hoping for the best does not constitute a sound social strategy. Instead, publishers need to consider the types of interactions that matter most to their online audience—and use that to fuel their decisions around what and where to share. To help you understand what readers want to see and engage with on social media, Ritter’s Communciation compiled some stellar social stats to help you get started.20Save Originally published Jul 17, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017center_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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Nothing is Original: Why the Most Talented People Copy (And Why That’s OK)

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Dec 6, 2015 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 This post originally appeared on Agency Post. To read more content like this, subscribe to Agency Post.We have an insatiable thirst for the new.In business, we want new products, new campaigns, and new ways of reaching consumers.The shiny object syndrome isn’t just about being easily distracted. It’s also the result of thinking that what is new — and seemingly unique — is better.So how can we meet the increasing demands to come up with new ideas under shorter deadlines?Mark Earls believes we need to get better at copying — badly.“Copying lies at the heart of creativity,” writes Earls in Copy, Copy, Copy: How to Do Smarter Marketing by Using Other People’s Ideas, which was released earlier this year.Why Copying Makes Us UncomfortableEarls’ background is in planning — previously at St Luke’s and as the executive planning director for the EMEA division at Ogilvy & Mather in London. He also has published three other books, including Herd: How to Change Mass Behaviour by Harnessing Our True Nature and I’ll Have What She’s Having: Mapping Social Behavior. These previously published books deal more with insights on how people are social beings and how that relates to consumer behavior. Copy, Copy, Copy is the playbook for applying those insights to come up with new ideas, which is based on copying the success of others.But this idea of copying is uncomfortable for many people — especially those in agencies whose value to clients lies in the ideas it produces.He writes:Our culture has a very strong individualist strand: we prize the individual over the group and distrust those who don’t have a strong sense of authentic self, who don’t ‘know their own mind’, ‘self-actualize’, ‘sing their own song’ or whatever metaphor is popular down the dark self-help aisle in the bookstore.We pride ourselves on the uniqueness of our ideas, our thoughts, and our expressions. So the thought of saying that we copied someone else’s ideas would mean that we are not smart enough or creative enough or inventive enough to develop our own ideas.We worship originality, but actually, copying is an innate human skill — one we need for survival. We copy to learn, to understand, and to gain social status by mimicking others.And this focus on individualism is mostly a product of North American and European cultures.“We’re the unusual ones,” Earls said. “We’re the ones that think almost everything in human behavior is going to be explained by individuals and what goes on between and individual and peers. Everyone else seems to think human beings are, first and foremost, social creatures, and that much of what shapes human behavior is between them, not in between their ears.”In the book he points to the idea of Ubuntu, a South African philosophy, that is described as: “which sees man as a fundamentally social being, rather than a ‘host of individual entities that cannot help being in constant conflict.’”While many marketers think of consumers as concerned about “me,” much of the world thinks in terms of “we.” And this is often how people actually make decisions.“Without people copying each other, things don’t spread very fast or very far,” Earls said. “It’s human-see, human-do.”Why You Should Copy — BadlyThere are two types of copying. The first is replication or machine-like copying.Copying with the intention to “exploit the intellectual and financial effort involved in making something new and better” is how copying gets a bad rap, writes Earls.The second type is human copying, which Earls says naturally creates error — this is the kind of copying you need to master.The point is to copy badly (or loosely), to copy with the point of including variations or to fix known problems. You can also copy from “far away” — studying other industries and applying these to your own.Earls mentions an example of this “from a distance” copying: In the early 1800s, Joseph Marie Jacquard invented the Jacquard loom, which used laced together wooden punch cards to simplify the creation of complex textile designs. This system made it possible to created highly detailed, intricate weaving patterns quickly and accurately. This machine is inspired early computer technology that used punch cards to control data processing. How to Copy to Create Better Ideas FasterCopy, Copy, Copy isn’t about using someone else’s idea as the foundation of a new idea. And it certainly doesn’t condone copy cat advertising or blatant plagiarism.Instead, Earls provides a pattern book, a term originally used in architecture, for copying previously used and successful strategies.“We live in an agile age,” Earls said. “We’ve got to move faster than we’ve ever done before. Traditional strategy and creative strategy thinking isn’t yet equipped to do that. I found myself bemused by why it would take 6 months to come up with a fairly original and vague idea. That’s not good enough anymore. We have to work much harder.”Here are three examples from Copy, Copy, Copy to show how copying an approach to problem solving can lead to unique insights for a brand problem:“Dramatically Over-Engineer Better: This is one of the signature trends in modern marketing: 20 years ago, SUVs were a minority working vehicle, now few school runs are without vehicles capable of competing in and completing the Paris-Dakar Rally. The same is true of the wristwatch business – while the elegantly simple and the cheap and simple are still around, the explosion of diving or aviator watches worth thousands of dollars (often worth more than a car) is remarkable. Indeed, the over-engineering of leisure clothing is legion – from sportswear to expeditionary equipment. These ‘extreme’ outdoor clothing brands are popular at a local North London bus stop: North Face, Annapurna and Patagonia. Being good enough to climb mountains in or wade mighty rivers in makes them ideal for any challenges you might encounter on the 29 bus (or even the 253).”“Promote an Unusual and Irrelevant Feature: The mainstream beer market has been prone to this for some time. In the US, there was a phase when the nature Appalachian water used to brew with was a point of difference. In the UK, we had ‘widgets’ in cans to recreate the qualities of draught beer.””Make Packaging a Badge of Identity: Few packaging designs have real social identity. Coke’s classic bottle shape is an exception. As Martin Lindstrom points out, it is unmistakeable, even when broken and denotes both product qualities and authenticity but more importantly the shared identity of Coke drinkers Gateway computers used Friesian-patterned boxes to signal a different kind of computer was being delivered to a different kind of user – someone who clearly knows what’s what. Department stores like Selfridges and Bloomingdales have both created highly visible (and expensive) bags in order to use the fashion-set as walking endorsements of their brands.”He also suggests drawing as a way to come up with ideas or to reveal connections.People — especially those in our industry — tend to rely on jargon and what he calls “verbal fireworks.” Drawing forces us to be precise and to show the steps and connections in a real way. He writes:Time and again in our work we come back to the truth of this – to the importance of drawing as a mode of thinking, rather than a complement to it, or an afterthought. Drawing and thinking are closely related. Indeed, in many important ways, it’s worth assuming drawing IS thinking.In addition, these strategy frameworks and the mapping tool he provides make it possible for anyone on a team to be involved in ideation. You don’t need a psychology degree or an understanding of neuroscience.“I think that anything that excludes the talent we’ve got in the room from making contributions should be stopped,” Earls said. “This approach seems to bring into the strategy that player who’s not normally been allowed a voice.”Copy the Starting Problem for More Creative ResultsCopying has long been the go-to tool for the most innovative and creative people — from scientists to athletes to artists to musicians.Most problems are like other problems, which means most solutions requires similar approaches. It’s the errors, the small variations, made by the hands of a person newly approaching the issue, that makes anything truly unique.As Earls’ writes, “It’s what we learn from each other — what we copy — that allows us to create new things. Topics: Career Developmentlast_img read more

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From ‘Tiffany Blue’ to ‘Minion Yellow’: How Pantone Changed the Way We Think About Color

first_img Topics: This post originally appeared on HubSpot’s Agency Post. To read more content like this, subscribe to Agency Post. If you’ve been shopping recently, you might have noticed a few changes in color options.Everything from sweaters to couches to kitchen accessories are awash in soft shades of pink and blue — specifically Pantone 13-1520 and Pantone 15-3919. These two palettes, Rose Quartz and Serenity, were named Pantone’s Colors of the Year in December.This annual announcement, beginning in 2000 when its chosen hue was Cerulean, is the brand’s version of trendspotting and prediction as the authority on all things color, and it has been increasingly a highly marketed and media-covered event, spurring retailers and consumers to reconsider the selected shade.As Kyle Stock wrote in Bloomberg, “Pantone has effectively become to pigments what Anna Wintour is to the wider fashion world: part trendsetter, part enforcer.” What was once a solely utilitarian product for designers and printers, Pantone’s color chips have gained a cult following from design-minded individuals who are accustomed to bloggers distilling weddings and apartments and even movies into corresponding color palettes.Apparently, the language of color is one we can all understand.The History of PantoneFounded in the 1950s, Pantone originally manufactured color cards for cosmetic companies. Lawrence Herbert, a young chemist, saw that the company’s process could solve a more widespread problem: the lack of color standardization. There was no language for communicating about and reproducing colors. There was no consistency, which caused a large amount of rework and reprinting in the graphics industry.Consider this: Would National Geographic’s iconic yellow border have become so memorable if February’s edition looked more chartreuse while April’s border was tinted a shade of mustard?Seeing the opportunity, Herbert bought the company in 1962 and forwent medical school to focus on creating a color system now known as the Pantone Matching System (PMS), which began as 10 standardized colors and today consists of more than 10,000.These colors chips, printed in the recognizable fan book format, give designers and printers the tools to communicate about something color — something most people perceive differently. Pantone created a common language whereby designers, artists, printers, and clients could definitively choose Pantone 212 C, not 213 C or 205 C, and then printers would know how much of 14 different pigments they should add to create that exact color. But the brand didn’t stop at creating new combinations of yellow, blue, purple, red, etc. Pantone recently created color standards for the fashion and interiors industry, has a consultancy practice whereby its works with brands, produces color trend forecasting guides, and has launched itself as a lifestyle brand — owning a Pantone-inspired product is just another way for a person to show her appreciation of good design.How Pantone Branded ColorPantone’s emergence as the most well-known color standards company — and yes, there are competitors — is partly due to its longevity in the industry. But it’s also because of the brand’s smart marketing plays that Pantone has come to be about more than the science of creating and matching colors. The brand employs color psychologists and color economists who explain the feelings the colors should evoke, not just their chemical makeup.Leatrice Eiseman, the executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, gave a statement to the New York Times in 2007 on that year’s selection: “Blue Iris brings together the dependable aspects of blue, underscored by a strong, soul-searching purple cast. Emotionally, it is anchoring and meditative with a touch of magic.”This year’s selection was released with this statement: “As consumers seek mindfulness and well-being as an antidote to modern day stresses, welcoming colors that psychologically fulfill our yearning for reassurance and security are becoming more prominent. Joined together, Rose Quartz and Serenity demonstrate an inherent balance between a warmer embracing rose tone and the cooler tranquil blue, reflecting connection and wellness as well as a soothing sense of order and peace.”It continues: “In many parts of the world we are experiencing a gender blur as it relates to fashion, which has in turn impacted color trends throughout all other areas of design.”Source: Pantone’s InstagramThis yearly marketing event is not just about the company showing off its ability to forecast trends in color selection, but also about its ability to understand how societal changes are influencing our visual preferences. While this may seem like a leap, it has played well with the media and partners such as photo-editing app Aviary, which release Rose Quartz- and Serenity-colored filters when the selection was announced. But beyond this yearly event, Pantone has found unique and memorable ways to solidify its relationship with designers and garner the adoration of those outside of its target market with licensing deals and quirky products. Here are 10 other interesting examples of marketing from the master of color:1) Pantone SwagPantone has capitalized on its own brand — that rectangle of color with a black text over a white band — by creating its own line of products. These include everything from folding chairs to ornaments to iPhone cases. 2) Tiffany Blue While many think of Audrey Hepburn eating breakfast in pearls and black evening gloves in front of Tiffany’s Fifth Avenue store, the more prevalent image is not an image at all, but a color. Who better to mix and standardize the color of all those little blue boxes than Pantone? Tiffany & Co.’s iconic robins-egg blue is actually PMS number 1837 (the brand’s founding year). Pantone created the custom color for the brand, which is trademarked and not available in any fan book. It remains one of the most well-recognized brand-color associations in the world. Source: Tiffany & Co. Starbuck’s green, the Hermes orange, the red on the sole of Christian Louboutin, and Coca-Cola’s red are all Pantone customized colors under trademark protection.3) Sephora-Pantone Universe Color of the Year CollectionGoing back to its roots in cosmetics, the brand partners with Sephora each year to create a custom makeup palette so anyone can enhance their look with the color(s) of the year.  153SaveThe Influence of ColorPantone has become so recognizable both within and outside of the design community that its brand has inspired other artists and designers. There have been Pantone dessert tarts and beer cans. And artist  Angelica Dass used Pantone colors to match a person’s skintone and challenge our perception of how we define skin color. Pantone has created a language of color and in doing so, created an opportunity for itself to become both the authority on creating and marketing color as a brand. And to think that all this started with a young chemist who had to hand-mix shades for a retail display so women could choose the right shade of pantyhose. 4) The Pantone HotelNeed a vacation to refresh and recharge your creative powers? You can do so surrounded saturated, bold, and pastel color swatches at the Pantone Hotel in Brussels. A Pantone licensing venture allowed for this inspired hotel hideaway that has a gift shop full of Pantone-inspired products and consultants available for color education and color psychology sessions.Source: Fast Company5) InstagramIt only makes sense that the creator of a color language would be a perfect match for the largest network of visual-based communicators?Pantone’s Instagram feed is candy for the color-obsessed. Bright Pantone swatches are paired up with foods, books, drawings, clothes, and more of equal color intensity. The brand showcases behind-the-scenes photos at what is largely a chemical company, designers using its color guides, and just plain — yet perfect — images of colors. Source: Pantone’s Instagram6) Minion YellowFor the release of the Minions movie in 2015, Pantone partnered with Universal Pictures to create an animated character-inspired color — its first release in three years. The chosen hue is meant to exude “hope, joy and optimism.” While the color can be used (unlike Tiffany Blue), it was released as a Pantone “fashion, home, and interior” color, so you’ll have to buy your way to a Minion-colored living room.7) The Pantone CycleIn 2012, the brand partnered with bicycle manufacturer Abici Italia to create four color-inspired models: Green 627C, Ruby Red 186C, Turquoise 15-5519, and Mimosa 14-0848. These color code numbers and the Pantone name were prominently displayed on the bike’s chain guard. Who wouldn’t want to show off their design cred while weaving through traffic during a morning commute?8) The Diamond JubileeWorking with ad agency Leo Burnett, Pantone release a limited edition color guide inspired by Queen Elizabeth’s “fashion-forward colour statements” to celebrate the monarch’s 60-year reign. The palette highlights the Her Majesty’s love of monochromatic dressing.Source: Pantone9) ColorstrologyAre forecasts in love and work based on celestial movements not enough? Maybe the missing piece in planning your future is color.Michele Bernhardt, a healer and metaphysician, wrote Colorstrology, which blends astrology, numerology, and color theory to define a person’s birthday color and align it with a specific Pantone color. 10) Celebrate Color InfographicTo celebrate its 50th anniversary, Pantone created this infographic highlighting the changing color preferences by decade. While nothing revolutionary, it shows how well the brand has adapted to digital marketing.153Save Originally published Mar 20, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Psychology of Color Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

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