Special election announced to recall North Slope mayor

first_imgCharlotte Brower. Photo: North Slope Borough.North Slope officials have called for a special election to recall Mayor Charlotte Brower after residents successfully gathered enough signatures on a petition.Download AudioKTVA-TV reports the announcement was made Tuesday at a North Slope Borough Assembly meeting.The effort to recall Brower began after allegations that she misused borough funds. She has been accused of using public money to send her grandchildren to a basketball camp in California and to purchase cakes for her daughter.Petitioners starting gathering signatures in November and have collected more than the 492 signatures needed for the recall.According to the borough clerk’s office, the special election will be held April 5.Bower said in a statement that she is looking forward to discussions with the community on the important issues facing the borough.last_img read more

MITs smart algorithm can fix dumb AI

first_imgNot sure which neural network or bludgeoning AI tech is most likely to become humanity’s next robot overlord?Well that’s all about to change, as the clever folks at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) have found a way to test which machine-learning technology is the smartest.The MIT researchers reported developing a new methodology and technology to assess how smart, accurate and “robust” convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are on Friday.Despite the naming, CNNs aren’t robo news readers. They’re a special type of network designed to process and classify images. The tech is used for a variety of different things ranging from auto tagging in consumer photography apps, to government facial recognition tech and self driving cars.Related: Best VPNThe issue is, if they go wrong, it can lead to dangerous things, like facial recognition tech throwing up false positives or a self-driving car ignoring a stop sign – which is why ensuring accuracy and eliminating mistakes in CNNs is fairly important.The new MIT methodology reportedly identifies weak CNNs using nifty a algorithm that generates and throws “adversarial examples” at the networks. These are apparently force the CNN to evaluate a series of images containing minor changes that are undetectable to the human eye, like a limited number of darker, or lighter pixels.Vincent Tjeng, a graduate student in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), and first author of the research paper, explained:“Adversarial examples fool a neural network into making mistakes that a human wouldn’t. For a given input, we want to determine whether it is possible to introduce small perturbations that would cause a neural network to produce a drastically different output than it usually would.“In that way, we can evaluate how robust different neural networks are, finding at least one adversarial example similar to the input or guaranteeing that none exist for that input.”Related: Best free anti-virusIn short, the test stress tests the CNN by throwing increasingly difficult adversarial examples at it until it breaks and an image is misclassified.This apparently lets them get an exact metric how “robust” and accurate the CNN is. In theory this should help companies improve their self driving car, image tagging and facial recognition tech, which will lead to better products and services for consumers in the near future, if it’s implemented.The MIT researchers aren’t the only people trying to create better checks and safeguards for machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies. The European Commission published a set of laws for AI earlier this year. Sadly they weren’t anywhere near as cool as Asimov’s laws. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.last_img read more