Tag: 爱上海WP

Spinal Tap liked 11% milkfat, yes?

first_imgWant to surprise your audience into paying attention? Here is a great example.Suppose you’re trying to sell milk in a way that is cooler than those mustaches, which are getting old. How about irony? How about shades of Spinal Tap and a retro young ironic hip cool vibe?How about… putting milk inside a guitar? In the hands of a musical phenom by the name of White Gold?Talk about zigging instead of zagging… You’ve got to love this Got Milk? campaign for California.last_img

Read more…

Six ways to reduce your risk of dementia

first_imgAn aging population is leading to a growing number of people living with dementia. Dementia is an umbrella term for a group of symptoms, including memory impairment, confusion, and loss of ability to carry out everyday activities.Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, and causes a progressive decline in brain health, with an estimated 5.7 million Americans living with the disease today. The main risk factor for dementia is older age. Around 30 percent of people aged over 85 live with dementia. Genetic influences also play a role in the onset of the disease, but these are stronger for rarer types of dementia such as early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.Although we can’t change our age or genetic profile, there are nevertheless several lifestyle changes we can make that will reduce our dementia risk.Engage in mentally stimulating activitiesEducation is an important determinant of dementia risk. Having less than 10 years of formal education can increase the chances of developing dementia.People who don’t complete any secondary school have the greatest risk.The good news is that we can still strengthen our brain at any age, through workplace achievement and leisure activities such as reading newspapers, playing card games, or learning a new language or skill.The evidence suggests that group-based training for memory and problem-solving strategies could improve long-term cognitive function. But this evidence can’t be generalized to computerized ‘brain training’ programs. Engaging in mentally stimulating activities in a social setting may also contribute to the success of cognitive training. Maintain social contactMore frequent social contact (such as visiting friends and relatives or talking on the phone) has been linked to lower risk of dementia, while loneliness may increase it.Greater involvement in group or community activities is associated with a lower risk. Interestingly, size of friendship group appears less relevant than having regular contact with others.Manage weight and heart health There is a strong link between heart and brain health. High blood pressure and obesity, particularly during mid-life, increase the risk of dementia. Combined, these conditions may contribute to more than 12 percent of dementia cases.In an analysis of data from more than 40,000 people, those who had type 2 diabetes were up to twice as likely to develop dementia as healthy people.Managing or reversing these conditions through the use of medication and/or diet and exercise is crucial to reducing dementia risk.Get more exercise Physical activity has been shown to protect against cognitive decline. In data combined from more than 33,000 people, those who were highly physically active had a 38 percent lower risk of cognitive decline compared with those who were inactive.Precisely how much exercise is enough to maintain cognition is still under debate. But a recent review of studies looking at the effects of taking exercise for a minimum of four weeks suggested that sessions should last at least 45 minutes and be of moderate to high intensity. This means huffing and puffing and finding it difficult to maintain a conversation. Don’t smokeCigarette smoking is harmful to heart health, and the chemicals found in cigarettes trigger inflammation and vascular changes in the brain. They can also trigger oxidative stress, in which chemicals called free radicals can cause damage to our cells. These processes may contribute to the development of dementia. As dementia risk is higher in current smokers compared with past smokers and non-smokers, this provides yet another incentive to quit once and for all.Seek help for depressionMajor depressive disorder affects approximately 14.8 million American adults. In depression, some changes occur in the brain that may affect dementia risk. High levels of the stress hormone cortisol have been linked to shrinkage of brain regions that are important for memory.Vascular disease, which causes damage to blood vessels, has also been observed in both depression and dementia. Researchers suggests that long-term oxidative stress and inflammation may also contribute to both conditions. A 28-year study of more than 10,000 people found that dementia risk was only increased in those who had depression in the 10 years before diagnosis.One possibility is that late-life depression can reflect an early symptom of dementia.Other studies have shown that having depression before the age of 60 still increases dementia risk, so seeking treatment for depression is encouraged.Other things to consider Reducing dementia risk factors doesn’t guarantee that you will never develop dementia. But it does mean that, at a population level, fewer people will be affected.Recent estimates suggest that up to 35 percent of all dementia cases may be due to the risk factors outlined above.This figure also includes management of hearing loss, although the evidence for this is less well established.The contribution of sleep disturbances and diet to dementia risk are emerging as important, and will likely receive more consideration as the evidence base grows.Even though dementia may be seen as an older person’s disease, harmful processes can occur in the brain for several decades before dementia appears. This means that now is the best time to take action to reduce your risk.Sourcelast_img read more

Read more…

Top Stories

first_img Top Stories The total package may be hard to find, but Arians believes there is talent in this year’s QB draft class.“So far, I would say one of the guys — I’m not going to mention names — I think one of them is probably ready to start as a rookie,” Arians said. “All the rest, there are some really talented arms that need a year of learning how to play the position, especially at this level. If you’re plug-and-play then this draft is very small, but if you have time to bring them along then this draft is large because the talent level is there.”Arians wasn’t tipping his hand on the Cardinals’ plans for the NFL Draft from April 27 to 29 in Philadelphia where they have the 13th, 45th, 77th and 120th overall picks in the first four rounds. Then again, Arians can’t tip his hand because the plan will evolve with what happens on the draft floor.“Every year you would like to draft a quarterback,” he said. “We’ve had two with the name on the card ready to roll, and they’ve gone like a pick or three picks ahead of us the last two years.“You’ve got them set on your board where you’d like to take that quarterback and if he falls to you, take him, but don’t reach. If you’ve got one in the fourth round, don’t take him in the third round, cause now you’re screwing up your board, and you’re probably putting him in a position he doesn’t belong.” Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Arians does not believe the Cardinals need to draft a QB this year because he thinks Carson Palmer can keep playing, but if the Cardinals do draft a quarterback, Arians thinks that player will come into an ideal situation because of all the mentors the team has. Aside from Arians, assistant head coach Tom Moore and quarterbacks coach Byron Leftwich, the presence of Palmer and veteran backup Drew Stanton could provide a wealth of knowledge.“It would probably be one of the best situations for any of these kids to fall into because Carson is going to welcome him openly, and then Drew Stanton, you’ve got two guys who are mentors,” Arians said. “They’re going to listen to them probably more than they will listen to us.”There has been some speculation that Arians, 64, might retire rather than oversee another QB development, but Arians, like Palmer, said he welcome the chance to mentor another quarterback.“It’s probably the most fun I’ve ever had in the 40-some years I’ve been coaching,” he said. “Probably the most excited I got was when I was re-fired [in Pittsburgh] to go back and work with Andrew [Luck in Indianapolis]. That really rejuvenated me and gave me a whole new perspective on the game again.” Follow Craig Morgan on Twitter Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and sellingcenter_img Arians offered some insight on the qualities that quarterback should possess.“First of all, you have to have some stature,” he said. “There are no 5-11 quarterbacks; haven’t been any since Doug Flutie and it took him a hell of a long time to get in. The game has changed since Fran Tarkenton played.“You have to have some stature, you have to have some arm strength. It doesn’t have to be a cannon. Most guys with a cannon wait to see a guy get open and then they throw a fastball. Those get intercepted the other way. You have to have some anticipation so if your arm isn’t quite as strong and you anticipate better you’ll get it out on time.”Arians also cited the importance of deciphering information quickly.“What’s my protection? Am I hot? Do I have a sight adjustment, weak side? What’s the coverage? Who do I throw to in this coverage? That all happens in 1.5 seconds so if you can’t process that information you probably can’t play. You either can process information — you either have that brain ability or you don’t have it,” Arians said. “That’s the hardest thing to evaluate.” QB Carson Palmer chats with coach Bruce Arians during training camp Aug. 8. (Photo by Adam Green/Arizona Sports) 0 Comments   Share   PHOENIX — What would the ideal Cardinals quarterback of the future look like? Coach Bruce Arians offered his take on the final day of the NFL Annual Meetings on Wednesday at the Arizona Biltmore Hotel.“You take Ben (Roethlisberger), Andrew (Luck), Peyton (Manning), and I’m gonna throw Tim Couch in there, too,” Arians said. “You roll them all up and make one, and you’ve got a hell of a player, but it really starts here and here (pointing to his head and heart). If you’ve got a guy that’s got grit and he can lead, you can probably live with his skill level. Now if he’s got the skill level and those two things, you’ve got the world champ.” The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelolast_img read more

Read more…