Big Little Lies Adam Scott Making a scene

first_img Jun 14 • The secret screen life of Being Frank star Jim Gaffigan Did you play with a lot of tech when you were a kid? What was your first computer? Scott: You know, my dad and my brother had the very first Apple II and then the Apple IIe, and then the very first Macintosh, which we still have. I don’t even know if it turns on anymore. I think it does. My brother is still in computers. He’s a designer — a programmer — but I was never adept with computers on the level that my father and my brother were. But they were always around, and we would go to … what is the Apple convention up in the Bay Area? I think AirPods are a real game-changer. I just love that they’ve kind of subtly changed my life in a weird way. Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown on voicing a not-always-perfect pig Talking with Chewbacca Post a comment With the entire series in front of you to discover and being a kid, it really expanded my imagination and was influential on my taste for stories and movies and what I found interesting. So I jumped at the chance to be in The Twilight Zone. You play Ed Mackenzie on Big Little Lies. Season 1 is over, and I know you’re doing season 2. What’s the best thing about working on Big Little Lies?  Scott: The cast, the writing and directing. And season 2 is going to be really fun for people. It’s really juicy. Anything else you can say? Scott: I can’t. adam-scott-studio-session-331Scott: “Meeting Mark Hamill was all I wanted as a kid.” Mark Mann You sure? Scott: A hook will come down and pick me up and you’ll never see me again. You also play a demon, named Trevor, on The Good Place. Did you pick that name? Scott: No, no. Mike Schur, who created the show, I believe picked Trevor. If Michael, the Ted Danson character who designed the Good Place, were to design a personal hell just for you, what would it be? Scott: Personal hell built just for me? There would be really loud afternoon TV advertisements playing at all times. Like for insurance, for injury law. It seems like it’s all life insurance, injury law and medications that play during the day, blaring at all times. It would be really hot. There would be no AC. And all the clothing would be really tight and uncomfortable. Now playing: Watch this: Adam Scott is a quiet standout Amazon Tags reading • Big Little Lies’ Adam Scott: Making a scene Apple $144 2:45 See it Aug 28 • In pursuit of perfect ice Mentioned Above Apple AirPods 2019 (Charging Case) TV and Movies See It See It Share your voice Apple Aug 12 • Sterling K. Brown: ‘Acting is about reconnecting with a sense of play’ See It 0 Kristen Bell was hosting Jimmy Kimmel’s show and surprised you with a visit from Mark Hamill, whom you once invited to your birthday party when you were a kid. Your face is like the kid who got every birthday wish in their entire life. What was that like? Scott: It was really weird because it was obviously being televised — and to be thrown off guard and surprised like that on camera, with an audience, is very strange and felt Truman Show-y. But really cool. I mean, meeting Mark Hamill was all I wanted as a kid, so it was obviously a big deal. Really cool. He gave you a lightsaber. Scott: He did, yeah. You still have it? Scott: Yeah, it’s cool. You’re in a classic episode of the new remake of The Twilight Zone. Why did you want to do it? Scott: I’m in Nightmare at 30,000 Feet, which is a remake of Nightmare at 20,000 Feet. William Shatner did it in the original series and then John Lithgow did it in Twilight Zone: The Movie in the early ’80s, both of which I’ve seen dozens of times. When we got the script for the new series of The Twilight Zone, I think I said yes before I even read it, which is not what you’re supposed to do. But The Twilight Zone is my favorite show ever. I used to stay up every night because they would play reruns at 11 p.m. every night. I had a 5-inch black-and-white TV in my bedroom. It was the only TV in the house, and I would keep the volume low so my mom wouldn’t know and just watch Twilight Zone every single night. See All Macworld Expo. Scott: We must have gone to that. I kind of grew up watching that evolve, watching Apple grow as a company. I still love their gear, and their gadgets are beautiful and intuitive. So you’re an iPhone user? Scott: Yeah. And I think AirPods are a real game-changer. I just love that they’ve kind of subtly changed my life in a weird way. It keeps you connected, which is both good or bad. It makes being connected effortless. You can stay connected to an audiobook or a podcast or music or whatever it is. It just makes it all easier. I mean, we’ve had headphones and earbuds for years. But these — it’s a brilliant design. I have other Bluetooth headphones from other companies, and none of them are as intuitive as the AirPods, which just blend in with your body. This is all sounding very sci-fi, but it really is a brilliant design. It feels like it’s part of you, in a weird way. I’ve found them to be my favorite Apple product in a long time. star-wars-chewbacca-dollScott had fun playing with this interactive Chewbacca doll. Hasbro Because of that seamlessness? Scott: Yeah, ease of control too. It’s really simple just to double tap. I really love it. I’ve had the Apple Watch now for a few months, and I’m starting to feel the benefits of it. And now I feel weird without it (gesturing to his bare wrist). But the AirPods are … a really simple step up in tech. Some people think they look kind of geeky. They certainly make a statement about who you are when you wear them walking down the street. Scott: So people think they’re too geeky? Because they’re bright white? But that’s good branding. If they’re invisible, then I don’t know. I think they look cool. I think they look beautiful. But I would be anxious to get black ones if they came out with those. That’s a cool idea. You’re not only an actor, you also produce. Are you at all looking at the world of virtual reality or augmented reality? Scott: Not yet. But I think it’s inevitable that everyone will. It seems like things are heading in that direction. But we’ve so far fallen short of integrating it into everyday life and into home entertainment on a grand scale. I’m not sure exactly what it is that’s holding it back from becoming something that everyone kind of just grabs when they’re ready to consume entertainment at home. You guys probably have a better handle on why it hasn’t. Maybe the ultimate set hasn’t landed yet. Yes, some headsets are heavy, uncomfortable. Some people get nauseous, so throwing up kind of gets in the way. Scott: Not the funnest part of being entertained. But I’ve experienced it a few times, and it’s extraordinary. I think it’s just a matter of finding the wearable tech that’s seamless and comfortable, right? That’s the biggest hurdle, I would imagine. Do you have a smart home? Are you into any smart home gear? Scott: I mean, here and there. We haven’t fully jumped into that, mostly because I always feel a little reticent. You always feel like if you commit to something, it’s going to change. And I don’t mind turning on a light switch. We have a [smart] thermostat, and it’s really handy. But I don’t need the entire home to be a smart home — at least not yet. Nightmare at 30,000 FeetIn an episode of the Twilight Zone reboot, Scott plays a nervous passenger who’s convinced his flight is about to crash. Robert Falconer/CBS © 2018 CBS Interactive Self-driving cars: Good idea or bad? Scott: I think they’re a good idea. It’s an exciting idea. And I think in a few years it won’t be dangerous anymore. It’s probably safer than a human driving a car right now. It’s where we’re headed. Whether it’s safe or not, that’s where it’s all going. What tech do you wish had never been invented? Scott: That’s a really good question, but I don’t know. How about tech you’d like to see invented just for you that you haven’t seen? Scott: I still feel like they haven’t perfected the pillow. Because even some of the memory foam ones, they’re — it’s great, but then it’s not. It’s too hot. I feel like the pillow has a way to go, and I’m willing and able to wait, but excited to find the perfect pillow. Best Buy Now playing: Watch this: CNET Magazine It’s easy to see why Adam Scott is often cast as the approachable everyman. He’s pretty low-key in person, with a deadpan delivery that prompts double takes. It’s a persona he’s been able to transform into notable characters he once described as “befuddled beta males.” On NBC’s Parks and Recreation, he embodied Ben Wyatt, a calzone-loving state auditor who dresses up as Batman and owns his encyclopedic knowledge of Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, Star Trek and Game of Thrones. In HBO’s drama series Big Little Lies, he plays Ed Mackenzie, the beleaguered second husband of main character Madeline (Reese Witherspoon), and shows he can stand up to his alpha wife: “Look, I may not be the good-looking adventure ride, OK? But there is something to be said for being there, for being truthful, for being somebody you can steadfastly count on. I will not be anybody’s runner-up.” He’ll return for season 2 of Big Little Lies on June 9 (read our review here). In Jordan Peele’s reboot of the classic sci-fi series The Twilight Zone, which debuted in April on CBS All Access, Scott takes a lead role. (Editors’ note: CBS operates CBS All Access and owns CNET.) He plays a reporter with PTSD who boards a plane and finds an old MP3 player in the seat pocket in front of him. It plays a podcast, which seems to be from the future, about the mystery of the tragic flight he’s on, transforming him into the weirdo who no one will believe is trying to save them from disaster. But right now, Scott has us all smiling. We’ve surprised him with Star Wars collectibles — he’s a huge fan of the sci-fi epic — and he riffs about the interactive Chewbacca doll and talking Yoda mask. Adam Scott: “I’ve just always been a Star Wars fan.” Mark Mann “I feel like everyone in this room was transported to Yoda’s home planet just for a second,” he tells us after trying on the mask. “Don’t worry guys, it’s just me. It’s just a mask. I put a mask on. Everyone relax.” By the time he describes his own personal hell — a nod to his role as Trevor, a rude (but funny) demon, on the NBC comedy series The Good Place — we’re laughing out loud. “Personal hell built just for me? There would be really loud afternoon TV advertisements playing at all times. Like for insurance, for injury law,” he says during our CNET Magazine cover shoot in Los Angeles. “It would be really hot. There would be no AC. And all the clothing would be really tight and uncomfortable.” Fall 2019 MagazineSee more great stories from CNET Magazine. Mark Mann Scott also talked about staying up late watching reruns of The Twilight Zone on his family’s black-and-white TV when he was a kid, how his Apple AirPod wireless headphones have changed his life, and why he thinks there’s an opportunity for someone to reinvent the pillow. Here’s an edited transcript of our conversation. Q: You’re a big Star Wars fan. What’s the appeal? Scott: I guess anyone under the age of 75 is probably a Star Wars fan. It’s been around for so long now. I clearly remember The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi when I was in elementary school, so I really grew up with them. My friends and I were all about Star Wars. It was kind of a rite of passage to collect the figures and make your own lightsabers. I’ve just always been a Star Wars fan. I think I said yes before I even read it, which is not what you’re supposed to do. But The Twilight Zone is my favorite show ever. • $144 3:04 $159 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Apple AirPods 2019 Review • AirPods 2019 review: King of truly wireless earphones crowned with small enhancements $144 CNET Magazinelast_img read more

Indias lowcaste workers create Mumbai chaos

first_imgMany businesses in the Indian financial hub of Mumbai closed on Wednesday as protesters from a low-caste community blocked traffic and shopping malls and staged sit-ins on railway lines after clashes with right-wing Hindus.The call for a general strike across the western state of Maharashtra led to largely peaceful protests, but life in many parts of Mumbai was disrupted with Dalits pelting buses with stones and deflating tires in some areas. Railway lines and some major roads leading into the city were blocked.The Dalits, who rank at the bottom in India’s ancient caste hierarchy, called the strike in protest against attacks from right-wing groups in the city of Pune on Monday. The strike shut businesses and schools in Mumbai and other cities across the state.“The government didn’t arrest the perpetrators of violence in Pune. Hindu group members were beating Dalits and the police were just watching from afar,” said protester Sandeep Kamble. “We are demanding the arrest of the culprits.”The protest came a day after thousands of Dalits hurled stones and caused traffic disruption across Mumbai. Dalits have been ostracized by upper-caste Hindus for centuries for jobs they deemed as impure, such as garbage pickers and tannery workers.Those protests followed celebrations by Dalits in Pune, 150 km (95 miles) from Mumbai, on the 200th anniversary of a battle they won, fighting alongside British colonial forces, against an upper-caste ruler. Those celebrations were disrupted by right wing Hindu groups and a 28-year-old man was killed in the clashes, according to the state government.In parts of the Mumbai suburb of Thane, officials banned the assembly of crowds, small or large, to control protesters, who disrupted road and rail services during the morning rush hour.Schools were closed in some cities and internet service was down in places to restrict social media access and the spread of rumors.Fleet taxis, along with cab hailing services like Uber and Ola, were also largely off the roads in Mumbai on Wednesday. Several offices asked employees to work from home.last_img read more

From times immemorial

first_imgIndia Tourism Development Corporation (ITDC) took another step to celebrate its glorious past by unveiling – The Ashok – Capital Icon, a coffee table book at The Ashok in the Capital. Compiled as a chronicle, the book was released by Shripad Naik, Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Tourism and Culture who took special pride in unveiling the book. Parvez Dewan, Secretary, Ministry of Tourism and Sameer Sharma, Managing Director, ITDC were present at the ocassion. People from the Ministry of Tourism, other government departments and stakeholders from Travel and Hospitality sector also marked their presence. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Speaking on the occasion, Sameer Sharma said, ‘This is a proud moment for us to revisit all those cherished moments of our glorious history and share them with all of you as priceless treasures.’The book is written by veteran travel writers Hugh and Colleen Gantzer. The book captures the history of the The Ashok from the time of its conceptualisation in the 1955 to the present day. The hard bound compilation captures and at the same time refreshes the timeless moments from the independence era through 500 photographs illustrated in more than 275 pages.   Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe compilation starts from the distant age of the massive supercontinent Gondwanaland, on the far shore of the prehistoric Tethys weaving through the Mughals and the British eras. The book also talks about the post independence period and the origin of The Ashok. ‘The authors have spent a very long period to encompass the vast history of this rich heritage and its each milestone in one chronicle -The Ashok,’ says ITDC.last_img read more

Reconversion to continue till Centre bans it says Togadia

first_imgDelivering a keynote address at ‘Virat Hindu Hridaya Sangama’ at Puttur near here on Friday evening, Praveen Togadia said Hindus could no longer be silent on conversions which resulted in the “dwindling” of their population. “We want the government to either ban religious conversions or allow us to go ahead with our re-conversion programmes,” he said. The NDA government, facing opposition heat over the ‘ghar vapsi’ (home coming) programme of Sangh parivar outfits in some parts of the country, has already stated its willingness to bring an anti-conversion law and called for the support of all parties to the law. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJITogadia said a uniform civil code should be introduced in the country and the government should bring in a rule to ensure that every couple, irrespective of religion, could have only two children.He also called upon the Hindus to fight what was being called ‘Love Jihad’ which was “ruining” the identity of the nation. Over four lakh Hindu families in Kashmir who got converted under “pressure”, should be brought back to their religion, he said.last_img read more

Hospital opens dental clinic offers free implant surgeries

first_imgKolkata: Dental patients, who need implants, will now get free of cost treatment at Dr R Ahmed Dental College and Hospital as a new dental implant clinic has started functioning on the hospital campus.Doctors from the department of Prosthodontia, department of oral and maxillofacial surgery and the department of Periodontia will treat the patients at the new dental clinic at the hospital. Since March 2, when the clinic was officially inaugurated, senior doctors from all the three departments conducted dental implant surgeries on 12 patients. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataArtificial teeth would be implanted replacing those which have been damaged owing to various causes. There may be a single implant or multiple implants as determined by the expert doctors of the hospital. Dr Tirthankar Debnath, assistant professor, department of Periodontia and Public Health dentistry said the whole process of dental implant might take about four months and the process would be conducted in various phases. According to Dr Debnath, there are two aspects of dental implant — mechanical and biological. A titanium base would be implanted as a Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateroot on jawbone and an artificial teeth made of ceramic would be fitted on the titanium base. “The teeth would be implanted a couple of months after the titanium base is fitted on the patients’ jaw so that the base becomes a permanent part of the jaw through Osseointegration. It is a process that allows dental implants to become a permanent part of the jaw. I t maintains the structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant. When the titanium base is cemented with the jaw, it is desirable to implant the metal ceramic teeth,” Dr Debnath said. Using dental implant the patients will be able to use the teeth almost like an original one. The patients can make the use implanted teeth up to 95 per cent naturally, an expert said. According to sources, a patient would have to pay anything between Rs 20,000 and Rs 50,000 for a single implant at private establishments depending on the quality of the implants. While Dr R Ahmed Dental College and Hospital is conducting the surgeries free of cost. The Mamata Banerjee government has carried out major infrastructure reforms in the state-run hospitals where the patients are availing best treatment free of cost. Dr Raju Biswas, a member of Dental council of India, said: “We are thankful to the Chief Minister for her support and motivation towards the newly inaugurated implant clinic at the hospital. In an era of scientific advancement, implants are essentials for all the patients undergoing dental extraction.”last_img read more