Month: January 2021

Ridge reflects on American brand

first_img In part, the idea of America involves risks, he said. In a way similar to that of a business, America must manage its risks. In addition to leadership, brand name also transcends the fields of business and national security. Ridge invoked images of the first pioneers, the lunar landings and the millions of American servicemen and women as examples of American risk-takers. “Everyone in the organization has value,” he said. “All work has dignity.” Addressing leadership, Ridge informed students on the importance of communication skills and the importance of not only knowing, but also being able to articulate one’s mission statement.  “We all knew what we were doing the day and morning of Sept. 11,” Tom Ridge began. “Complacency [is the single greatest danger to national security] — the notion that as time elapse we forgot that we are at war with a belief system and leaders of a belief system who patient and persistent.” Yet, despite America’s shortcomings, Ridge maintains a positive and optimistic view of the nation he loves. “I can say to you in good faith that we have been true to our values,” Ridge said. “Americans live in freedom. We don’t live in fear … People all over the world still love the idea of America.” Ridge explained that America does not always abide by its value system.  This is perhaps most evident in the recent controversy over Guantanamo Bay. While recognizing the complexities of the situation, Ridge said he believes the prison’s occupants are entitled to due process.center_img Ridge, whose many titles have included the governor of Pennsylvania and Secretary of Homeland Security, now serves as president and CEO of Ridge Global, LLC. Speaking in the Jordan Auditorium in Mendoza on the weekend of the anniversary of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Ridge offered a presentation that fittingly tied both business and national security. “[My proudest accomplishment is that] I’ve been given that many opportunities and my service was valued,” he said. “Notre Dame has a brand … America has a brand as well. It’s our value system,” Ridge said. “We have to be consistent with [our value system].  The rest of the world is watching.”  “America has always had risk management — we’re a country of risk-takers,” he said. “We manage our risks.” When answering audience questions, Ridge expanded upon previous answers and addressed other new topics, including the relationship between the economy and national security, the challenge of cooperation between national agencies and the need for a more effective use of America’s soft power. Ridge said homeland security has an objective to secure and preserve freedom — including religious expression.  “Titles get compliance,” he said. “Leaders get commitments.”last_img read more

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SMC hosts abroad returnees to help readjust

first_imgSaint Mary’s Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) hosted a welcome back event Tuesday with the aim of helping study abroad students readjust to life back home. At the event, CWIL staff members discussed the readjustment phase that most study abroad returnees face, and they offered suggestions as to how the process could run more smoothly. “Keep in touch with your friends in your host country,” Alice Siqin Yang, assistant director of Global Education, said. “In addition, join clubs that will help you continue your cultural learning experience.” Yang discussed many other suggestions, and Maureen Baska, a representative from the Career Crossings Office, discussed ways to market the study abroad experience to potential employers. “Your abroad experience shows you have acquired certain skills such as independence, maturity, intellectual and cultural curiosity and adaptability that will stand out to potential employers,” Baska said. “Also, study abroad helps some students develop language skills that are useful.” In addition to the readjustment concerns and business benefits of study abroad, the event also stressed the student view of study abroad. Participants were encouraged to share their stories and their readjustment struggles. Abby Altman, a Saint Mary’s junior who studied in Austria, discussed the United States customs she had forgotten.   “In Austria, it was normal to pay for using a public restroom. Then, when I was back in the United States, I remember being in the airport and seeing water fountains out in the open and thinking, ‘Bathrooms are free!’” Other students shared stories of growth and realization. One student mentioned an experience in China where she discussed the meaning of love in American culture and another shared her learning experience of having her credit card stolen in Rome. No matter the circumstance, all the girls said they learned and grew from their experiences. However, they still realize the troubles of re-adjusting. Maggie LeMay, a junior returnee from Rome said returning is almost like going to college for the first time all over again. “I feel like I’ve had a third freshman year; things have changed,” LeMay said. Saint Mary’s senior and returnee from South Africa, Karolyn Wojtowicz said although readjusting is hard, it is still easy to see the benefits of studying in a different country. “I was the only one of my circle of friends who studied abroad. Even though I spent nine months away from my Saint Mary’s friends, it was still nice to see that we all still get together after study abroad.” Wojtowicz also said how she had changed. “Study abroad does make you more independent,” Wojtowicz said. “I would highly suggest it to anyone contemplating a study abroad program. You create your own world and gain an idea of life outside of Saint Mary’s. If I can survive South Africa, I can survive any city.” Numerous study abroad programs were represented at the event, including programs located in China, Rome, Ireland, South Africa and Austria.last_img read more

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Swarbrick addresses students

first_imgNotre Dame Director of Athletics Jack Swarbrick stopped into both campus dining halls during lunch Wednesday to challenge and caution students. “We have a really important football game the Saturday you return from fall break,” Swarbrick said to a full dining room in South Dining Hall, referring to the Oct. 22 game against USC. “I need two things from you to make that night successful.” Swarbrick acknowledged a hotly contested sentiment among Irish fans, commented on the energetic atmosphere, or lack thereof, of Notre Dame Stadium and encouraged the Irish student body to take matters into its own hands. “I need your passion,” he said. “I travel around with our team, and our stadium is the quietest place we play. I want you guys on that Saturday night at least once to make USC have a false start penalty.” To close his two-minute cameo and let students return to their meals, Swarbrick reminded them that though it may be a night game, usual behavior would be expected. “We haven’t had a night game here in a long time because people are concerned about having a game that late and the consequences it will have on our conduct,” he said. “You can solve that problem. So help us on that Saturday night to make the loudest, most raucous, but safe environment in college football.”last_img read more

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Conference cultivates naval leadership

first_imgOn Feb. 20-23, Naval ROTC midshipmen from units across the country gathered to participate in Naval Leadership Weekend on Notre Dame’s campus.Junior Max Brown said the conference emphasized developing ethical and effective leadership. “About 150 midshipmen and staff members came from all over the country to listen to really prolific and nationally outstanding leaders in the military,” he said. The conference provided midshipmen the opportunity to prepare for and examine ethical dilemmas, Brown said.Courtesy of MJ Jackson “We can all sit around the table and share and understand and form our own character and moral compass and ability to answer hard questions that we will be faced with as military officers in the future, beforehand, so that we’re ready to go forth when the time comes,” he said. There is also an ethical component to the conference, which Brown said emphasizes character development. “In the Navy, there are three things that we work for in midshipmen development: moral, mental and physical development,” he said. “Physical is making sure everyone is keeping in shape, mental is high standards for academics. “Notre Dame has always been able to lend a particularly salient perspective to [moral development], in the academic sense and the whole spirit of this place.” Freshman MJ Jackson said the symposiums and panels at the conference also discussed the qualities of successful leadership and cyber warfare. “We also talked about military ethics and emerging technologies in warfare and defense, and national security and the impacts those will have on our career as officers and the world in general,” she said. Colonel Frank Rossi, a professor of aerospace studies at Notre Dame, discussed the relationships between the military branches, Jackson said. “[He talked] about how relationships between Army, Air Force and Navy officers will become very important throughout our career,” she said. “We need to understand the different cultures of the different forces and learn how to relate to them because we are all fighting for the same goal.”Jackson said she appreciated the emphasis on communication between the branches of the military. “I think a lot of the times, in the military, competition between the branches is overstressed, instead of collaboration. I think we need time to understand each other better before we go out and have to interact in high-pressure situations.” The conference also provided the opportunity for midshipmen from different universities to meet each other, Jackson said. “It was really cool to interact with people who have very different backgrounds from me,” she said. “There’s an element of sameness because we are all going to be working together in the future, but it was kind of cool to see how some midshipmen from other schools have a completely different culture. “It was interesting to see people from different places all coming together to contribute their ideas and to have an ongoing conversation about leadership.”Brown said the large civilian population at the University makes it a unique venue for the conference. “A lot of other institutions don’t have the military component, a lot of times it’s just the military. Notre Dame provides a really cool opportunity to nationalize perspectives, and show that we’re an institution that has a broad variety of viewpoints,” Brown said. Jackson said she has since applied the topics discussed at the conference to her academic interests. “The panelist discussion we had was discussing the ethics of cyber technology and cyber warfare, so now I’m working with one of the professors to expand on that,” she said. “I’m researching the just war tradition as it applies to cyber technology and warfare.” Tags: NROTClast_img read more

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Cable failure causes power outage

first_imgLate Sunday night, a cluster of buildings concentrated on the south side of South Quad, including four dorms, lost power for around four hours, according to University spokesman Dennis Brown. Students confirmed Carroll Hall also lost power.“At approximately 10:20 p.m. Sunday, a failed piece of cable led to a power outage in 11 buildings: St. Joseph Hall, Columba Hall, Holy Cross Annex, [the] Rockne [Memorial], Lyons, West Lake Hall, Fisher, Pangborn, Dillon, Alumni and a small portion of Fitzpatrick Engineering,” Brown said. “The failed section of cable was isolated and service restored to the first three facilities by approximately 2 a.m. and the balance of facilities by approximately 2:20 a.m.Brown said there was “no relation” between this power outage and other minor outages this semester or the nearly campus-wide blackout Feb. 27.“Permanent repairs are forthcoming,” he said. “… Once repairs are made, there likely will be a very short, scheduled outage at some point in the future to restore the system to its normal configuration. The timing for that will be communicated to building managers, rectors and others.”Tags: power outagelast_img read more

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University administration responds to sexual assault with initiatives and campaigns to promote awareness

first_imgEric Richelsen | The Observer Editor’s Note: This is the first installment of a five-part series on sexual assault at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories focus on the University and College actions and initiatives in response to sexual assault.In recent years, both Notre Dame administrators and student government leadership have focused on ending sexual violence on campus with, among other initiatives, campaigns to promote awareness and bystander intervention.The Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention (CSAP), comprised of faculty, staff and student representatives, offers recommendations to the office of Student Affairs on supporting victims of sexual violence, encourages collaboration in programming and promotes educational initiatives.CSAP was born out of a resolution from student senate in December 2008, which asked for a review of “the effectiveness of the University’s sexual assault, rape and sexual misconduct policy, resources for victims of sexual assault and the University’s disciplinary options available to victims of sexual assault.”2012 Campus Climate SurveyIn 2012, the first campus climate survey was administered to students to gauge areas of need, the results of which Vice President for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding said were “extremely helpful.”Hoffmann Harding said the 2012 survey demonstrated that non-undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students had lower awareness than undergraduates on University policies and support services dealing with sexual assault.“So in response, what we’ve done over the last few years is add a variety of different training programs particular to those two student populations,” she said.In response to students’ demonstrated confusion on the concept of consent, Hoffmann Harding said the University has added clarification points and training for students, “to try to better articulate those nuances and provide information.”“Following the survey in 2012, the next year we additionally conducted a series of focus groups with students, particularly around areas we wanted to better understand,” she said.“Now, last spring, we administered our second climate survey and Heather [Ryan, deputy Title IX coordinator,] is in the process, she’s three weeks into her new role, and actually one of her responsibilities is to analyze this climate survey, and the results there.“Our intention is again to share the results with the CSAP, which is a cross-campus and cross-community survey, and to utilize those results in a way to improve communication on campus.”BenchmarkingDeputy Title IX coordinator Heather Ryan said more and more colleges have begun to administer climate surveys, as well.“I think this year is the year we’re going to do some really good benchmarking. As we go back and forth, we haven’t had any data available externally, from institutions, prior to this year,” Ryan said. “And so I think that this next year or two are really going to be key in gaining that information, to figure out what are the best practices possible.”Matt Lahey, associate general counsel for the University, said Notre Dame annually examines its policies and compares it to benchmark schools.“We made revisions this summer to our policies, as we did the summer before, and benchmarking these policies helps us with that effort, he said. “We do a lot of benchmarking related to education, those initiatives.“Green Dot came out of that benchmarking, looking at what major programs other universities are using, how they’re trying to change their culture,” he said. “No one has the absolute one right approach, and what everyone is trying to do is understand what approaches have been working.”Christine Caron Gebhardt, director of the Gender Relations Center (GRC), said one of the challenges in choosing a violence prevention program is the lack of research on the effectiveness of the programs.“… Because what’s your measure of success? Your cases increase? Or your cases decrease? And how do you know the case decrease isn’t merely [the cases] going underground? So part of it, what we’re trying to do is to find a way, how do you measure success,” she said. “And I think that’s a change we’ve seen over the years, is we’re not just saying, ‘Oh, we’ve done this,’ but ‘How do we know we’re making a difference?’”Caron Gebhardt said Green Dot’s measure of success is that when 15 percent of the student body is bystander-trained. At the 15-percent point, incidence of sexual assault should decrease, measured in reports to both confidential and non-confidential resources.She said the University is one of several institutions studying the effectiveness of Green Dot, and therefore has been very deliberate in its implementation on campus.Student governmentStudent government has played a large role in creating student body engagement on the issue, the director of the department of gender issues, junior Danny Funaro, said.Funaro said the department of gender issues has participated in the Green Dot launch as well as worked on promoting the “It’s On Us” campaign, the University’s iteration of the national movement commissioned by the White House to end sexual violence on college campuses.“‘It’s On Us’ tries to get people to take ownership of the issue, so the main thing that goes with that is the ‘It’s On Us’ pledge,” he said. “Pledge cards were last year’s version of this pledge — this year we’ve put more of a focus on the itsonus.nd.edu pledge.”More than 200 students have signed the pledge this year, Funaro said. The department hopes to have more than 400 students sign by the end of the semester.“The main way we’ve done that is by going door-to-door in different dorms,” he said. “You can actually get good conversations with people … [and] get people that really want to get involved.”Funaro said he has noticed there is sometimes more difficulty getting men involved in programming and campaigns to end sexual violence.“To get the general male population involved is a little bit harder, but I think we’ve made inroads in that, versus last year, when the ‘It’s On Us’ pledge was signed mostly by women,” he said. “This year there’s a much better balance.”In October, student body president and senior Bryan Ricketts spoke to The Observer on the report student government delivered to the Board of Trustees on sexual violence on Notre Dame’s campus.“Sexual violence is something we’ve been talking about on our campus for a long time now,” Ricketts said. “… There’s a lot of talk about prevention and what we’re doing on front, and in addition to that it’s sort of widely accepted as a rule — but also statistically at Notre Dame — that the number of reported assaults does not nearly match the number of actual assaults that we have on campus.“Those are still issues that we’re trying to work through,” he said. “That was a big reason behind the impetus of this report, to give some context to where we are on campus as well as to do a little digging what we need to do better and where we’re not meeting the standards.”The report focused on four major topics: campus conversation surrounding sexual violence, the trajectory of change on the issue at Notre Dame, alcohol culture’s role in sexual violence and a process overview, supplemented by students’ experiences. It concluded with a series of recommendations to the trustees on how to curb sexual violence on campus and how to improve the process of reporting and navigating the Title IX process.Tags: campus climate survey, GRC, greeNDot, Office of Student Affairs, sexual assault, sexual assault series 2015last_img read more

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2016 Election Observer: Christina Wolbrecht

Editor’s Note: Throughout the 2016 presidential campaign, The Observer will sit down with Notre Dame experts to break down the election and its importance to students. In this ninth installment, Associate News Editor Rachel O’Grady asks the director of the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy, Christina Wolbrecht, about the role of women in politics in the 2016 election. Rachel O’Grady: Over our Easter break, Bernie Sanders won a number of states (Hawaii, Alaska, Washington) and is slowly chipping away at Hillary Clinton’s lead. Could Sanders pull out the nomination? CW: ​At Notre Dame, most students remain registered in their home states, so I hope and expect that many students have already had a chance to participate in their state’s primary via absentee ballot. One downside of a caucus system is it makes it difficult for out-of-state residents to have a say. College students should be paying attention to the issues that they feel will have the biggest impact on our country and world today and in the years to come, be that the environment or trade or income inequality or civil rights or the size of government or insert your passion here. ​I’d encourage students to learn as much as they can about the issues they care about and about the arguments each candidate is making on the issues that matter most to you. I don’t have any advice on what students should be paying attention to, but I do very much hope that our students are indeed paying close attention to this election and will become informed and effective participants in our political process.Tags: 2016 Election, 2016 Election Observer, christina wolbrecht, Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy ROG:  Clinton has the potential to be the first female President of the United States. Seeing as your area of study focuses on women in politics, I’ll intentionally leave this question open [and] broad for you. What implications does this have on politics as a whole? Moreover, why has it taken so long to even conceive of women in the highest office in the land? Christina Wolbrecht: ​Sanders indeed had a good Easter weekend with victories in three far western states. Sanders has done particularly well in caucus states, which reward particularly passionate supporters who are willing (and able) to wait in long lines to cast a vote for their candidate. Some have argued that momentum is on Sanders’ side, and there is no question that he has emerged as a far more popular and successful candidate for the Democratic nomination than many expected. It remains unlikely he will secure the nomination, however. ​Leaving aside the issue of superdelegates, Hillary Clinton still leads in the number of pledged delegates, and Sanders would have to secure overwhelming victories in many of the remaining states. This is a particular challenge for him as, unlike many Republican states, Democratic rules require delegates to be allocated by proportional representation. This means even in states where Sanders edges out Clinton, she still continues to pick up delegates. It remains possible for Sanders to win — and in this election, anything seems possible — but unlikely.Whether Sanders wins the nomination or not, we can and should expect his candidacy to have had an effect on the political system. The level of support for his candidacy suggests real frustration on the left (just as we are seeing real frustration on the right) with some of the policies and practices of current Democratic politicians. Those politicians, including Hillary Clinton, have little choice but to hear that message, and strong incentives to respond to those concerns. CW: ​Income inequality is significant in the U.S. and has attracted increasing attention during this electoral cycle. I would emphasize that income and wealth inequality have been on the rise throughout the industrialized world; what most distinguishes the U.S. is how little our public policy does to alleviate the effects of that disparity. Addressing the causes of income inequality is difficult, as they are ​rooted in broad shifts in the economy and society at national and global levels. Much of inequality is driven by stagnant wages in the lower and middle income deciles and staggering income growth for the most wealthy. What candidates can do is propose policies to alleviate the hardships and uneven opportunities that inequality causes. Such policies might range from changes in the tax code to education policy to direct social welfare benefits. I would encourage students to look closely at the sorts of very specific policy solutions the candidates are proposing to address those conditions, and to be attentive to debates about how effective those policies would really be.ROG: Taking it back to college campuses, particularly here at ND, where the Indiana primary is fast approaching, what is something we, as college students, should be paying particular attention to? ​CW: Parties are constantly transforming in response to changed realities, electoral outcomes, and political debate. The Republican primary race has certainly been unprecedented in many ways and challenges many assumptions about the ways in which party nominations work in the U.S. However, the race is not unprecedented in the sense of revealing important divisions within the party — the same could be said of the Democrats.​ Parties throughout our history have been characterized by divisive figures and issues which split parties internally; examples include Teddy Roosevelt’s Bull Moose break from the Republican party in 1912 over Progressivism and the Dixiecrats split from the Democratic party over civil rights in 1948. One can also think of the riots outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago or the delegates booing nominee Barry Goldwater at the Republican convention in 1964. As in all of those cases, I would expect the outcome of the 2016 primary season will be that the Republican party will change in important ways, although exactly how remains to be seen and depends in part on whether Trump actually secures the nomination.Some would argue that Trump represents a different challenge to the Republican party than the historical cases I have mentioned, each of which was rooted in a fundamental disagreement about the ideological and policy direction of the party. I agree. Trump disrupts the Republican party in many other ways, including his unorthodox approaches to political debate and campaigning, and his expressed willingness to violate a number of democratic norms. These are issues of great importance to our political process and political community. On the question of party divisions, however, as social scientists and journalists scramble to understand the sources of Trump’s support, it is increasingly clear that his supporters tend to share priorities and a view of the world that distinguishes them from non-Trump supporters in the Republican base. In that sense, this is not so different than many other internal splits parties have faced. ROG: Income inequality is an increasingly prevalent issue. Do any candidates provide real solutions, and more importantly, can any of them implement their policies to actually improve the current income disparity? CW: ​There are many reasons why the U.S. has yet to have a female president. Politics has been traditionally viewed as a male endeavor. One of the questions the Gallup organization has asked the longest — since the 1930s — is whether citizens would vote for an “otherwise qualified” woman for president. Until the 1970s, fewer than half of American said they would — there are still voters who say they would not. Our expectations for the presidency — assertive, bold, strong, warrior — are at odds with our stereotypes about women. Women have traditionally entered politics later in life than men, usually when their children are older, leaving them less time to climb the political career ladder to the very top. Women have been dramatically under-represented — or not represented at all — in the careers that have produced presidents in the 20th and 21st centuries — generals, vice presidents, ​senators and governors — meaning that the eligible pool for possible female presidents is very small compared to the eligible pool of men. All of these factors — and more — have produced a context in which the nomination of a woman for president has been very long in coming in the U.S.ROG: Turning to look at the GOP, it looks like the party is starting to split amongst Trump supporters and the “Never Trump” set. Could we see a real shift in the Republican party over the next year, or even few years? What does that look like? read more

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Student senate proposes new constitution, adds club coordination council secretary

first_imgStudent senate passed motions proposing a new constitution and creating a secretary position in club coordination council Wednesday.The order proposing the new Constitution of the Undergraduate Student Body will not affect the way senate operates.Sophomore William Huffman, senator for Stanford Hall, asked junior parliamentarian Colin Brankin about how the new constitution will affect the running of senate.“Like actual, practical [changes]?” Brankin said. “Nothing. Not really anything.”The changes in the new constitution have been passed over the course of the year, including a provision to make quorum a consistent 2/3 among all of student government and changes to formatting throughout the constitution.“The problem with the old constitution is that a lot is kind of jumbled up,” Brankin said. “Now … there’s consistency so you can easily read the constitution. And a lot of the archaic language is cleared up to make more sense.”The new constitution passed with one opposition and one abstention.The proxy for O’Neill Hall, freshman Jake Marcionette, was the only vote against its passage. Marcionette was filling in for junior O’Neill senator Sebastian Lopez.Eduardo Luna, sophomore senator from Knott Hall, abstained from the vote.After the order passed, Luna asked for clarification about the function of the “power of the purse” as stated in the constitution.Brankin, senior Judicial Council president Matt Ross and senior student body vice president Sibonay Shewit explained how the budget is allocated.“There’s a section of the Committee on the Budget whose responsibility it is to approve the allocation [of the budget],” Ross said.“Each branch has a representative,” Brankin said. “All the leaders of the organizations are there to approve these budgets. That’s how it’s been, always.”Luna asked if senate has a budget.“Yeah,” Shewit said. “That’s how we pay for Jimmy John’s and apparel.”Luna then yielded his time, saying he was “just keeping you guys in check.”Senior and Club Coordination Council president King Fok presented a proposition to create the position of club coordination council secretary.“Right now there’s no secretary and the controller’s been taking the minutes, but that’s been really difficult,” Fok said. “He’s supposed to be managing all of the clubs’ finances.”The order passed with one opposition and no abstentions.Marcionette was again the only opposition. He said Lopez, O’Neill Hall’s usual senator, did not instruct him to oppose every order.Sophomore Breen-Phillips Hall senator Eve Takazawa announced that there will be a presentation to the student senate by an administrator March 21 regarding the housing policy.“They’re working on a waiver system and they’ve had discussions with the student advisory board so far,” Takazawa said.The senators spent the rest of the meeting in committee time. Student senate meets every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in the Notre Dame Room of LaFortune Student Center.Tags: Club Coordination Council, Constitution of the Undergraduate Student Body, student senatelast_img read more

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Jamestown Duo Facing Drug Charges Following Overnight Traffic Stop

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now Stock Image.JAMESTOWN – Two Jamestown residents are facing several drug charges after officers allegedly recovered meth and fentanyl during a traffic stop overnight.Jamestown Police say 27-year-old Michael Krause and 29-year-old Kyle Lewis were pulled over for alleged traffic violations in the area of Forest and Prather Avenues just before 2 a.m. on Saturday.Officers say while speaking with the duo they allegedly observed drug paraphernalia and open alcohol containers inside the vehicle.Through further investigation police say they recovered a quantity of meth and fentanyl; along with digital scales and drug packaging materials. Once at city jail, police allege they found additional drugs hidden on Lewis.Both are charged with two counts of second-degree criminally using drug paraphernalia.Lewis is additionally charged with third, fifth and seventh-degrees criminal possession of a controlled substance; while Krause issued numerous traffic tickets.Krause was released on appearance tickets and Lewis was held in Jamestown City Jail pending arraignment in the case.last_img read more

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No Man’s Land & Waiting for Godot, Starring Patrick Stewart & Ian McKellen, Extends & Changes Schedule

first_imgThe critically acclaimed hits No Man’s Land and Waiting for Godot currently running in repertory starring Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart, have been extended through March 30 on Broadway. The limited engagement was slated to close March 2 at the Cort Theatre. Additionally, the final two weeks ending March 23 and March 30 have a modified schedule, with the number of Godot performances increasing to six and those of No Man’s Land decreasing to two. In addition to real life besties, Stewart and McKellen, Waiting For Godot and No Man’s Land stars Tony winners Shuler Hensley and Billy Crudup. Godot features Stewart as Vladimir, McKellen as Estragon, Crudup as Lucky and Hensley as Pozzo. No Man’s Land features Stewart as Hirst, McKellen as Spooner, Crudup as Foster and Hensley as Briggs. Star Files Waiting For Godot View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 30, 2014center_img Waiting For Godot tells the story of two wanderers who wait by a tree to meet with Godot, whom they hope will change their lives forever. No Man’s Land concerns two elderly writers who meet in a London pub and continue drinking through the night, until their relationships are exposed by the return of two younger men. Related Shows Ian McKellen Patrick Stewartlast_img read more

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