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University administration responds to sexual assault with initiatives and campaigns to promote awareness

first_imgEric Richelsen | The Observer Editor’s Note: This is the first installment of a five-part series on sexual assault at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories focus on the University and College actions and initiatives in response to sexual assault.In recent years, both Notre Dame administrators and student government leadership have focused on ending sexual violence on campus with, among other initiatives, campaigns to promote awareness and bystander intervention.The Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention (CSAP), comprised of faculty, staff and student representatives, offers recommendations to the office of Student Affairs on supporting victims of sexual violence, encourages collaboration in programming and promotes educational initiatives.CSAP was born out of a resolution from student senate in December 2008, which asked for a review of “the effectiveness of the University’s sexual assault, rape and sexual misconduct policy, resources for victims of sexual assault and the University’s disciplinary options available to victims of sexual assault.”2012 Campus Climate SurveyIn 2012, the first campus climate survey was administered to students to gauge areas of need, the results of which Vice President for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding said were “extremely helpful.”Hoffmann Harding said the 2012 survey demonstrated that non-undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students had lower awareness than undergraduates on University policies and support services dealing with sexual assault.“So in response, what we’ve done over the last few years is add a variety of different training programs particular to those two student populations,” she said.In response to students’ demonstrated confusion on the concept of consent, Hoffmann Harding said the University has added clarification points and training for students, “to try to better articulate those nuances and provide information.”“Following the survey in 2012, the next year we additionally conducted a series of focus groups with students, particularly around areas we wanted to better understand,” she said.“Now, last spring, we administered our second climate survey and Heather [Ryan, deputy Title IX coordinator,] is in the process, she’s three weeks into her new role, and actually one of her responsibilities is to analyze this climate survey, and the results there.“Our intention is again to share the results with the CSAP, which is a cross-campus and cross-community survey, and to utilize those results in a way to improve communication on campus.”BenchmarkingDeputy Title IX coordinator Heather Ryan said more and more colleges have begun to administer climate surveys, as well.“I think this year is the year we’re going to do some really good benchmarking. As we go back and forth, we haven’t had any data available externally, from institutions, prior to this year,” Ryan said. “And so I think that this next year or two are really going to be key in gaining that information, to figure out what are the best practices possible.”Matt Lahey, associate general counsel for the University, said Notre Dame annually examines its policies and compares it to benchmark schools.“We made revisions this summer to our policies, as we did the summer before, and benchmarking these policies helps us with that effort, he said. “We do a lot of benchmarking related to education, those initiatives.“Green Dot came out of that benchmarking, looking at what major programs other universities are using, how they’re trying to change their culture,” he said. “No one has the absolute one right approach, and what everyone is trying to do is understand what approaches have been working.”Christine Caron Gebhardt, director of the Gender Relations Center (GRC), said one of the challenges in choosing a violence prevention program is the lack of research on the effectiveness of the programs.“… Because what’s your measure of success? Your cases increase? Or your cases decrease? And how do you know the case decrease isn’t merely [the cases] going underground? So part of it, what we’re trying to do is to find a way, how do you measure success,” she said. “And I think that’s a change we’ve seen over the years, is we’re not just saying, ‘Oh, we’ve done this,’ but ‘How do we know we’re making a difference?’”Caron Gebhardt said Green Dot’s measure of success is that when 15 percent of the student body is bystander-trained. At the 15-percent point, incidence of sexual assault should decrease, measured in reports to both confidential and non-confidential resources.She said the University is one of several institutions studying the effectiveness of Green Dot, and therefore has been very deliberate in its implementation on campus.Student governmentStudent government has played a large role in creating student body engagement on the issue, the director of the department of gender issues, junior Danny Funaro, said.Funaro said the department of gender issues has participated in the Green Dot launch as well as worked on promoting the “It’s On Us” campaign, the University’s iteration of the national movement commissioned by the White House to end sexual violence on college campuses.“‘It’s On Us’ tries to get people to take ownership of the issue, so the main thing that goes with that is the ‘It’s On Us’ pledge,” he said. “Pledge cards were last year’s version of this pledge — this year we’ve put more of a focus on the itsonus.nd.edu pledge.”More than 200 students have signed the pledge this year, Funaro said. The department hopes to have more than 400 students sign by the end of the semester.“The main way we’ve done that is by going door-to-door in different dorms,” he said. “You can actually get good conversations with people … [and] get people that really want to get involved.”Funaro said he has noticed there is sometimes more difficulty getting men involved in programming and campaigns to end sexual violence.“To get the general male population involved is a little bit harder, but I think we’ve made inroads in that, versus last year, when the ‘It’s On Us’ pledge was signed mostly by women,” he said. “This year there’s a much better balance.”In October, student body president and senior Bryan Ricketts spoke to The Observer on the report student government delivered to the Board of Trustees on sexual violence on Notre Dame’s campus.“Sexual violence is something we’ve been talking about on our campus for a long time now,” Ricketts said. “… There’s a lot of talk about prevention and what we’re doing on front, and in addition to that it’s sort of widely accepted as a rule — but also statistically at Notre Dame — that the number of reported assaults does not nearly match the number of actual assaults that we have on campus.“Those are still issues that we’re trying to work through,” he said. “That was a big reason behind the impetus of this report, to give some context to where we are on campus as well as to do a little digging what we need to do better and where we’re not meeting the standards.”The report focused on four major topics: campus conversation surrounding sexual violence, the trajectory of change on the issue at Notre Dame, alcohol culture’s role in sexual violence and a process overview, supplemented by students’ experiences. It concluded with a series of recommendations to the trustees on how to curb sexual violence on campus and how to improve the process of reporting and navigating the Title IX process.Tags: campus climate survey, GRC, greeNDot, Office of Student Affairs, sexual assault, sexual assault series 2015last_img read more

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What we learned from the women’s Twenty20 World Cup

first_imgThe Twenty20 World Cup culminated on Sunday with hosts Australia beating India by 85 runs in front of a record crowd for a women’s cricket match in Melbourne. Australia recovered from an opening-game defeat to win their fifth women’s Twenty20 World Cup Here are five things we learned from 17 days of pulsating action:Advertisement – Home heroes deliver – Australia’s star-studded team went into the tournament carrying the weight of expectations on home soil as four-time winners and defending champions. Loading… Australia’s captain Meg Lanning holds the Twenty20 World Cup as she celebrates with teammates After a shock defeat to India in their opening game, skipper Meg Lanning read the riot act and they didn’t slip up again, reinforcing their dominance of the sport.In their sixth final out of seven in the global showpiece, Australia won for a fifth time with a near flawless performance.“There was definitely some tough times through there but we stuck together as a group, we really just had each other’s back the whole time and it’s just a great group to be a part of,” said Lanning.– Interest rises –The popularity of women’s cricket has been steadily on the rise, with the tournament widely seen as taking it to a new level.More than 86,000 — a record crowd for a women’s cricket match — packed into the MCG for the final on Sundaycenter_img Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Birds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeThe Absolute 10 Greatest Shows In HBO History6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black Holes12 Marvel Superheroes When They Were KidsBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearWhat Happens When You Eat Eggs Every Single Day? More than 86,000 fans swarmed through the turnstiles of the Melbourne Cricket Ground to watch Australia play India in the final – a record for a women’s cricket game.The event also marked another move toward gender equality with prize money significantly boosted, although it still fell short of the amount the men receive.To counter this, Cricket Australia pledged a further US$600,000 to ensure parity if Australia were to win.Ahead of the final, the International Cricket Council launched a new campaign to attract one million new women and girls to the game in the next 12 months.– Teenage star shines –Fearless 16-year-old Shafali Verma came into the tournament promising so much, and she left with her reputation cemented as a future superstar of the game.India’s Shafali Verma, 16, reached the top of world batting rankings during the tournamentShe anchored India at the top of the order, playing some breathtaking strokes in racking up scores of 29, 39, 46 and 47 in the group stages, hitting more sixes than anyone else as she injected urgency into the team.While she misfired in the final, her exploits propelled her to the top of the ICC T20 batting rankings, only the second Indian after Mithali Raj to achieve the feat.“She brings so much happiness and positivity to the team, always wants to enjoy it,” captain Harmanpreet Kaur said of Verma.– Rain rethink –The International Cricket Council came in for stinging criticism for not factoring in a reserve day for the rain-affected semi-finals.Nothing in reserve: Players, officials and media could only watch as the rain caused England’s semi-final against India in Sydney to be abandonedEngland’s clash with India was washed out, sending India through to the final as the highest finisher in their group.“You’d hope now there is going to be a rule change… and moving forward, no other team will have to experience going out of a World Cup purely because of rain,” said “gutted” England skipper Heather Knight.Australia’s semi against South Africa went ahead, but the Proteas’ run chase was also affected by the weather. If it too had been abandoned, South Africa would have made the final.“I’d rather lose than get a free pass into the World Cup final,” said skipper Dane van Niekerk.– Smiles and promise –Thailand came into their inaugural tournament as an unknown quantity, but won over fans with not only gutsy performances, but their smiles and graciousness.Smiles all round: Thailand captain Sornnarin Tippoch (centre) celebrates with teammates after taking a wicket against the West Indies in PerthRead Also: Indian Wells tennis cancelled over coronavirus fears After struggling in their opening three games, they put together an imposing 150 for 3 against Pakistan, their highest score in T20s, before rain ruined hopes of a maiden World Cup win.Skipper Sornnarin Tippoch said it had been a learning curve and their final game was a statement of what to expect in the future.“I think that game really put things into perspective of how well we can deal with situations and how well we prepared for the tournament,” she said.“We couldn’t control the rain but I’m really happy how we controlled the innings and built that innings, making a statement of how we can play cricket.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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GT Beer/Limacol 2017 Round-Robin Knock-out Football tournament …

first_imgCLOSE contests were the order of the evening as the quarter-finals of the GT Beer/Limacol Limacol 2017 Round-Robin Knock-out Football tournament concluded in Linden and at Victoria, East Coast Demerara.In Linden, it was nip and tuck when Western Tigers edged Milerock FC 1-0. The Georgetown-based side brought the game to the Lindeners and were rewarded when Joshua Britton found the back of the net in the 57th minute.However, it was by no means over as Milerock seemed to put ‘pep’ into their steps and became fiercer in their thirst to equalise; coming as close as the post in a last-ditch effort on the edge of time.Western Tigers scorer Joshua BrittonHowever, the final blasts on the whistle ensured the score line remained unchanged.Game two was a physical contest between the veterans Federal Winners Connection (WC) and Eagles United, with the former winning 1-0 as well.Eagles started the game in fine style, weathering the physical style of the WC team and producing dazzling runs of their own, but the finishing in the final third lacked bite; with their players juggling their efforts at the goalmouth.While their defence was almost flawless, the centre backs let Rene Gibbons through just once and he made them pay the ultimate price, punching the ball past the flailing arms of the goalkeeper.Eagles continued on with the possession game, but could not find that decisive strike; their mid-field produced the goods that seemed not to translate to the final third.In the other round of games at the Victoria Ground, the Police Force through Dwain Jacobs (5th) and Quincy Holder (12th) overpowered Den Amstel for their 2-1 win, and a spot in the semi-finals.Kester Jacobs (3rd) minute strike was enough to give the West Coast Demerara side the lead, albeit brief.Almost the same plot played out in game two, where Santos came from behind to win against Mahaica Determinators 2-1.Eion Abel’s 4th minute strike was cancelled out through Dominique Bobb-(45th+3) stunner, with that crucial goal setting the stage for the decisive strike in the 77th from Orin Yarde to take the game away from the home side.In the semi-finals billed for the GFC on Friday, Winners Connection will battle the Boys in Blue while Santos will have the chance to meet Western Tigers. … Close games in quarter-final actionlast_img read more

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2017 Afrobasket: D’Tigers Edge Past Côte d’Ivoire To Begin Title Defence With A Victory

first_imgRelatedVIDEO: Watch D’Tigers Narrowly Beat Côte d’Ivoire 78-77 In Afrobasket OpenerSeptember 9, 2017In “National Team”2019 FIBA World Cup: Nigeria Defeat Côte d’Ivoire To Keep Olympic Dreams AliveSeptember 6, 2019In “D’Tigers”VIDEO: Watch How D’Tigress Crush Côte d’Ivoire To Make AfroBasket Semi FinalAugust 26, 2017In “Nigeria” Points Per Quarter1st: Nigeria 17-11 Côte d’Ivoire2nd: Nigeria 25-22 Côte d’Ivoire3rd: Nigeria 11-17 Côte d’Ivoire4th: Nigeria 25-27 Côte d’Ivoire Defending champion, D’Tigers of Nigeria began their Afrobasket title defense with a nervy 78-77 victory over fellow West African nation Côte d’Ivoire.Team captain, Ike Diogu was unstoppable as he provided 31 points and 8 rebounds to ensure Nigeria survived Côte d’Ivoire’s second half resurgence.Ike Iroegbu also scored 15 points as Washington Wizards center Daniel Ochefu was not seen with the team.last_img read more

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Racing Post B2B boosts bookmaker football packages

first_imgShare Spotlight ups matchday commentary reach and capacity for new EPL Season  August 21, 2020 Spotlight delivers Racing Post translated services for Pari-Engineering Russia August 26, 2020 StumbleUpon Related Articles Submit Share Spotlight Sports takes over MansionBet blog  June 18, 2020 Racing Post B2B has enhanced its operator ‘football content packages’, with the addition of further engagement features bringing punters closer to the action than ever before.Boosting bookmaker engagement, Racing Post B2B has strengthened its football content with the inclusion of confirmed line-ups, audio commentaries and new audio goal alerts.Furthermore, bookmakers will have access to pre-match expert analysis provided by Racing Post’s editorial team, with content able to be published across digital and in-store channels.Supplementing the predicted team line-ups, available three days before kick-off, is added news content from around the grounds, keeping customers up to date with all important injury news and press conference fall out.In its update, Racing Post confirms that its football content is produced for a global audience, available in over 60 languages.Racing Post’s Head of B2B Sport, Will Fyler, said: “The football market is so important to bookmakers that it is vital they offer the most enhanced experience to their customers. Our research shows that our expert content helps retain customers for up to 40% longer and it has been specifically designed to inform punters and engage them for longer.“The enhanced pre-play content perfectly supplements Intellr In-Play that we launched in recent months, meaning Racing Post can now offer bookmakers a full life cycle of content and analysis from three days before kick-off right up to the final whistle.”last_img read more

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