Tag: 宁波碧水豪园被扫了

Four arrested in Indonesia tiger poaching case

first_imgIn January, Aceh police arrested a man trying to sell a tiger skin for some 90 million rupiah ($6,400), and dozens of wildlife crime cases have been recorded in recent years, according to the region’s conservation officials.Poaching accounts for almost 80 percent of Sumatran tiger deaths, according to TRAFFIC, a global wildlife trade monitoring network.Sumatran tigers are considered critically endangered by protection group the International Union for Conservation of Nature, with fewer than 400 believed to remain in the wild. The men — who had been under police surveillance — also had the teeth and bones of a sun bear, authorities added.”The four ensnared this protected animal in a trap and it was left to die,” said Aceh police spokesman Margiyanta, who like many Indonesians goes by one name.We think “the perpetrators are part of a syndicate given the professional way they caught the animals”.The animal parts may have been destined for buyers outside the region, he added. Topics :center_img Four suspected poachers have been arrested for killing a critically endangered Sumatran tiger, Indonesian police said Monday, highlighting the Southeast Asian nation’s battle with illegal wildlife trafficking.Authorities in Aceh, at the northern tip of Sumatra island, said they were also searching for a fifth suspect, all allegedly part of a crime syndicate.At a press briefing Monday, police displayed a confiscated tiger skin along with teeth and bones taken from the suspected traffickers. last_img read more

Read more…

Imagine waking up everyday in this beautiful and natural wonderland

first_img232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny.With a 12m heated lap pool and amazing views to enjoy all day, this master built home, known as Obi’s Whisper, has private access to Obi Obi Creek and a water hole. 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny.Originally from England, Dr Martyn has now retired from his practice in Brisbane.He and his wife are selling to travel the world and explore new places. The property has been set up to be low maintenance which gives the opportunity to come and go as you please.Th property is being marketed by Ray White Rural – Queensland selling agent Jez McNamara. Obi’s Whisper goes to auction on September 1 at level 26, 111 Eagle St, Brisbane if not sold prior. 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours ago232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny.There are multiple living areas and a second kitchen which open up the possibility of dual living, giving guests some privacy, or running a bed and breakfast. 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny. 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny.The current owner, Dr Martyn Green, has used the property as a weekender while maintaining his practice in Brisbane.“The unique architecture first attracted us to the home but it was the stunning water hole in the pristine Obi Obi Creek on the property’s boundary that made us fall in love with it,” Dr Green said.“It’s this feature that is truly unique. Upon a short walk or drive through the pristine rainforestyou come to a cabin that sits above a huge water hole, be sure to pack your swimmers, towels and even your paddle board, as down your own private path you’ll find the ever flowing Obi Obi Creek.” 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny. 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny. 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny.The owners of this Sunshine Coast property are ready to explore the world and are keen to sell.The four-bedroom, four-bathroom home at 232 Burgum Rd, North Maleny is spread across 8.86ha, and there’s plenty of room for cattle or horses. FREE: Get the latest real estate news direct to your inbox here. last_img read more

Read more…

Dickey provides team with young defender to bolster future

first_img Published on September 18, 2012 at 12:25 am Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+ The enormity of the game didn’t hit Erin Dickey until after it was over.Once Syracuse finished off Monmouth 8-1 for its season-opening win, Dickey finally felt like a college field hockey player.“Afterward, I was like ‘I really am playing as a D-I athlete,’” the freshman back said. “That’s what I always wanted to do.”After putting together an impressive high school career, Dickey joined Ange Bradley’s title-contending program, now 7-0 and No. 2 in the nation. Dickey’s only played in three games and is still learning how to be a college field hockey player, but Syracuse will count on her in coming years to help lead a defense that’s currently among the country’s best.After playing briefly in SU’s first game against Monmouth, Dickey was on the field for nine minutes in Syracuse’s next game against Ohio.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTo Dickey, though, it felt much shorter. She said the thrill of playing the fast-paced style of Division-I field hockey threw off her perception of time.“I really enjoyed myself because they say when you really enjoy yourself, time just moves faster,” Dickey said. “And it actually did.”Throughout her development as a field hockey player, Dickey had a unique edge over the competition. Her mother, Ange, played a year collegiately and Dickey’s aunt, Anne Bawler, played for Villanova.Dickey said her family’s success and experience in the sport helped motivate her to thrive, as well.“I knew what I could also accomplish,” Dickey said. “I could also follow in their footsteps and maybe possibly go further.”Dickey said her cousins have also competed in the sport, so family reunions often consisted of games of field hockey.“I was kind of brought up in a field hockey-oriented household,” Dickey said.As a senior in high school, Dickey led Central Dauphin High School in Harrisburg, Pa., to the Commonwealth Division and Mid-Penn Championships. The same year, she earned Pennsylvania All-State and District 3 Athlete of the Year honors. Dickey scored nine goals as a defender and received her team’s Defensive MVP Award, as well as a handful of other regional recognitions.Amid her successful high school career, Dickey realized that her love for the game opened up Division-I possibilities.“I was passionate about it,” Dickey said. “I enjoy being on the pitch every day. The love of the sport made me want to go further.”The back said choosing Syracuse over other suitors was an easy decision. She said she made up her mind as soon as she stepped on campus. Dickey said she was especially attracted to the team’s drive to push itself further each year.“She fell in love with Syracuse,” Bradley said. “You can’t ask for more than that. She has the skills to play here and we want her.”Seven games into her first season, Dickey is still adjusting to the college style of play, which she said is much faster than high school. She’s still learning the proper touch she needs to apply on the ball when passing to teammates, especially on J.S. Coyne Stadium’s artificial turf.Senior Iona Holloway, the backbone of the Orange’s defense, praised Dickey’s fitness and work ethic.“She’s a very athletic girl and she’s got a lot of power,” Holloway said. “I maybe sometimes scream at her a bit, but she doesn’t take it personally because she knows that I’m just trying to help her out. She’s going to grow into a really strong defender.”Holloway said the Orange’s relatively small roster allows plenty of practice time for the younger players, such as Dickey, to gain valuable experience.For now, the freshman has the privilege to watch and learn from one of the nation’s strongest and most experienced backfields.“It’s great,” Bradley said. “Because she needs to be ready to step up and get in there next year, for the (Atlantic Coast Conference).”Dickey said she is looking forward to seeing how much she’s improved at the end of the season. She said she has already seen changes in her game, but is confident that she will continue to improve for the better.Like everything else in her freshman season, Dickey’s progression is moving quickly.“Within the past four weeks, my style of play has grown probably faster and more rapidly than it has in high school,” Dickey said. “I need to take everything that I’ve learned over the years that I played field hockey and just speed it up, go faster and faster.” Commentslast_img read more

Read more…

Tom Seaver, heart and mighty arm of Miracle Mets, dies at 75

first_img Written By COMMENT FOLLOW US LIVE TV First Published: 3rd September, 2020 13:05 IST Tom Seaver, the galvanizing leader of the Miracle Mets 1969 championship team and a pitcher who personified the rise of expansion teams during an era of radical change for baseball, has died. He was 75.The Hall of Fame said Wednesday night that Seaver died Monday from complications of Lewy body dementia and COVID-19. Seaver spent his final years in Calistoga, California.Seaver’s family announced in March 2019 he had been diagnosed with dementia and had retired from public life.He continued working at Seaver Vineyards, founded by the three-time NL Cy Young Award winner and his wife, Nancy, in 2002 on 116 acres at Diamond Mountain in the Calistoga region of Northern California.Seaver was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 1991, and it reoccurred in 2012 and led to Bell’s Palsy and memory loss, the Daily News of New York reported in 2013.“He will always be the heart and soul of the Mets, the standard which all Mets aspire to,” Mike Piazza, a former Mets catcher and Hall of Famer, tweeted when Seaver’s dementia diagnosis was announced.Nicknamed Tom Terrific and The Franchise, Seaver was a five-time 20-game winner and the 1967 NL Rookie of the Year. For his career, from 1967-86, he had a 311-205 record with a 2.86 ERA, 3,640 strikeouts and 61 shutouts. He became a constant on magazine covers and a media presence, calling postseason games on NBC and ABC even while still an active player.He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1992 when he appeared on 425 of 430 ballots for a then-record 98.84%. His mark was surpassed in 2016 by Ken Griffey Jr., again in 2019 when Mariano Rivera became the first unanimous selection by baseball writers, and in 2020 when Derek Jeter fell one vote short of a clean sweep.His plaque in Cooperstown lauds him as a “power pitcher who helped change the New York Mets from lovable losers into formidable foes.” He changed not only their place in the standings but the team’s stature in people’s minds.Seaver pitched for the Mets from 1967 until 1977, when he was traded to Cincinnati after a public spat with chairman M. Donald Grant over Seaver’s desire for a new contract. It was a clash that inflamed baseball fans in New York.“My biggest disappointment? Leaving the Mets the first time and the difficulties I had with the same people that led up to it,” Seaver told The Associated Press ahead of his Hall induction in 1992. “But I look back at it in a positive way now. It gave me the opportunity to work in different areas of the country.”He threw his only no-hitter for the Reds in June 1978 against St. Louis and was traded back to New York after the 1982 season. But Mets general manager Frank Cashen blundered by leaving Seaver off his list of 26 protected players, and in January 1984 he was claimed by the Chicago White Sox as free agent compensation for losing pitcher Dennis Lamp to Toronto.While pitching for the White Sox, Seaver got his 300th win at Yankee Stadium and did it in style with a six-hitter in a 4-1 victory. He finished his career with the 1986 Boston Red Sox team that lost to the Mets in the World Series.Supremely confident — and not necessarily modest about his extraordinary acumen on the mound — Seaver was a 12-time All-Star who led the major leagues with a 25-7 record in 1969 and a 1.76 ERA in 1971. A classic power pitcher with a drop-and-drive delivery that often dirtied the right knee of his uniform pants, he won Cy Young Awards with New York in 1969, 1973 and 1975. The club retired his No. 41 in 1988, the first Mets player given the honor.“From a team standpoint, winning the ’69 world championship is something I’ll remember most,” Seaver said in 1992. “From an individual standpoint, my 300th win brought me the most joy.”Seaver limited his public appearances in recent years. He did not attend the Baseball Writers’ Association of America dinner in 2019, where members of the 1969 Mets were honored on the 50th anniversary of what still ranks among baseball’s most unexpected championships.Five months later, as part of a celebration of that team, the Mets announced plans for a statue of Seaver outside Citi Field, and the ballpark’s address was officially changed to 41 Seaver Way in a nod to his uniform number.Seaver did not attend those ceremonies, either, but daughter Sarah Seaver did and said her parents were honored.“This is so very appropriate because he made the New York Mets the team that it is,” said Ron Swoboda, the right fielder whose sprawling catch helped Seaver pitch the Mets to a 10-inning win in Game 4 of the ’69 Series. “He gave them credibility.”When the Mets closed their previous home, Shea Stadium, on the final day of the 2008 regular season, Seaver put the finishing touches on the nostalgic ceremonies with a last pitch to Piazza, and the two walked off together waving goodbye to fans.George Thomas Seaver was born in Fresno, California, on Nov. 17, 1944, a son of Charles Seaver, a top amateur golfer who won both his matches for the U.S. over Britain at the 1932 Walker Cup.Tom Seaver was a star at the University of Southern California and was drafted by Atlanta in 1966. He signed with the Braves for $51,500 only for Commissioner William Eckert to void the deal. The Trojans already had played exhibition games that year, and baseball rules at the time prohibited a club from signing a college player whose season had started. Any team willing to match the Braves’ signing bonus could enter a lottery, and Eckert picked the Mets out of a hat that also included Cleveland and Philadelphia.Among baseball’s worst teams from their expansion season in 1962, the Mets lost more than 100 games in five of their first six seasons and had never won more than 73 in any of their first seven years. With cherished Brooklyn Dodgers star Gil Hodges as their manager, a young corps of pitchers led by Seaver, Jerry Koosman, Gary Gentry and a still-wild Nolan Ryan, and an offense that included Cleon Jones and Tommie Agee, the Mets overtook the Chicago Cubs to win the NL East with a 100-62 record in 1969.They swept Hank Aaron and the Atlanta Braves in the first NL Championship Series to reach the World Series against highly favored Baltimore, which had gone 109-53. Seaver lost the opener 4-1 in a matchup with Mike Cuellar, then pitched a 10-inning six-hitter to win Game 4, and the Mets won the title the following afternoon.Perhaps his most memorable moment on the mound was at Shea Stadium on July 9, 1969, when he retired his first 25 batters against the Chicago Cubs. Pinch-hitter Jimmy Qualls looped a one-out single to left-center in the ninth inning before Seaver retired Willie Smith on a foulout and Don Kessinger on a flyout.“I had every hitter doing what I wanted,” Seaver recalled in 1992. “Afterward, my wife was in tears and I remember saying to her: ‘Hey, I pitched a one-hit shutout with 10 strikeouts. What more could I ask for?’”center_img WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News Last Updated: 3rd September, 2020 13:05 IST Tom Seaver, Heart And Mighty Arm Of Miracle Mets, Dies At 75 Tom Seaver, the galvanizing leader of the Miracle Mets 1969 championship team and a pitcher who personified the rise of expansion teams during an era of radical change for baseball, has died. He was 75. SUBSCRIBE TO USlast_img read more

Read more…