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SMC hosts abroad returnees to help readjust

first_imgSaint Mary’s Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) hosted a welcome back event Tuesday with the aim of helping study abroad students readjust to life back home. At the event, CWIL staff members discussed the readjustment phase that most study abroad returnees face, and they offered suggestions as to how the process could run more smoothly. “Keep in touch with your friends in your host country,” Alice Siqin Yang, assistant director of Global Education, said. “In addition, join clubs that will help you continue your cultural learning experience.” Yang discussed many other suggestions, and Maureen Baska, a representative from the Career Crossings Office, discussed ways to market the study abroad experience to potential employers. “Your abroad experience shows you have acquired certain skills such as independence, maturity, intellectual and cultural curiosity and adaptability that will stand out to potential employers,” Baska said. “Also, study abroad helps some students develop language skills that are useful.” In addition to the readjustment concerns and business benefits of study abroad, the event also stressed the student view of study abroad. Participants were encouraged to share their stories and their readjustment struggles. Abby Altman, a Saint Mary’s junior who studied in Austria, discussed the United States customs she had forgotten.   “In Austria, it was normal to pay for using a public restroom. Then, when I was back in the United States, I remember being in the airport and seeing water fountains out in the open and thinking, ‘Bathrooms are free!’” Other students shared stories of growth and realization. One student mentioned an experience in China where she discussed the meaning of love in American culture and another shared her learning experience of having her credit card stolen in Rome. No matter the circumstance, all the girls said they learned and grew from their experiences. However, they still realize the troubles of re-adjusting. Maggie LeMay, a junior returnee from Rome said returning is almost like going to college for the first time all over again. “I feel like I’ve had a third freshman year; things have changed,” LeMay said. Saint Mary’s senior and returnee from South Africa, Karolyn Wojtowicz said although readjusting is hard, it is still easy to see the benefits of studying in a different country. “I was the only one of my circle of friends who studied abroad. Even though I spent nine months away from my Saint Mary’s friends, it was still nice to see that we all still get together after study abroad.” Wojtowicz also said how she had changed. “Study abroad does make you more independent,” Wojtowicz said. “I would highly suggest it to anyone contemplating a study abroad program. You create your own world and gain an idea of life outside of Saint Mary’s. If I can survive South Africa, I can survive any city.” Numerous study abroad programs were represented at the event, including programs located in China, Rome, Ireland, South Africa and Austria.last_img read more

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LV BET celebrates Vanarama National League’s return

first_img Submit LV BET CEO Adrian Sidowski has celebrated the return of the Vanarama National League with the competition’s play-offs set to commence today. As the National League’s official betting partner, the firm has announced that it will continue to provide content, previews and odds for all of the competition’s remaining matches enhancing its fan engagement opportunities since fans cannot physically go to the games.Due to the global health pandemic the National League has opted for a points-per-game regular season conclusion to decide the six playoff contenders for possible promotion to League Two. Boreham Wood, FC Halifax Town, Yeovil Town, Barnet, Harrogate Town and Notts County will all be fighting for a place in the EFL with the competition concluding on 2nd August at Wembley.Sidowski commented: “After the League was stopped in the middle of March we were unsure whether we would see another ball kicked in the National League this season. To have the play-offs starting this weekend and the Final at Wembley is testament to our partners at the National League. We will be sharing content with fans, getting them closer to the action, as they can’t be at the matches themselves and providing them with the best previews and odds on all the matches.” BT Sport will be showing all the five matches from Vanarama National League live on TV. However, streaming will be available on all the Vanarama North and South matches as the Non-league season reaches its conclusion. LV BET has also confirmed that the firm will also have a ‘branding presence’ throughout the Vanarama North and South.In terms of which side LV BET odds, Harrogate are 7/4 favourites to win promotion from National League. Additionally, York City 8/5 and Havant & Waterloovile 7/4 are favourites to gain promotion from their respective divisions. LV BET appoints Marcin Jablonski as commercial lead September 18, 2019 LV Bet names Jarosław “Pashabiceps” Jarząbkowski as new brand ambassador December 20, 2019 Related Articles Share StumbleUpon Share Vanarama National moves towards immediate conclusion April 23, 2020last_img read more

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Massive whale washes ashore on Donegal beach

first_imgQuestions are being raised over a huge beached whale on Arranmore Island which is said to be causing quite a stink.The 20ft deceased creature is believed to have washed up on Friday last and currently lies across rocks at Beal a’Chraois on the eastern side of the island.Image via Arranmore Blue FerryArranmore RNLI crew members were alerted to the whale when a local resident noticed seabirds flocking around something white in the water. The crew were called to action during a presentation in the Waterfront Hotel Dungloe. They were being honoured with a €25,000 cheque – the proceeds of a fundraising ball – when they had to leave the celebrations early to identify the issue.Image via Arranmore Blue FerryNora Flanagan of the Arranmore Lifeboat told Donegal Daily the whale is now decaying in a small cove and creating a strong smell.“We are not quite sure what the plan is with the whale yet. If there is a high tide in the right direction it may take it away. If not, arrangements will have to be made with the council to lift it,” Ms Flanagan said.Gareth Doherty of the Donegal Irish Whale and Dolphin Group said it is likely to be a fin whale which has been dead for some time. “These whales should be a slate grey colour. The yellowing shows it has to be dead for at least two weeks,” Gareth told Donegal Daily.Fin whales are the second largest living mammals on earth, which can grow up to 70ft in length.Image by Arranmore Blue FerryGareth said: “The animal is in good condition apart from the colouration. It obviously died at sea.“Without a DNA test it would be hard to identify the species. My best guess is it’s a fin whale, but they are not usually seen in Donegal. Fin whales are mostly seen off Cork, Waterford and Kerry. “In my memory, Donegal hasn’t had a fin whale stranding in a long time.” Fin whales usually gather at the Continental Shelf far out in the Atlantic, he said, and this would explain the many weeks it took to wash ashore. Gareth warned that people should not approach or touch the whale, as some are highly contaminated.Image by Arranmore Blue Ferry“It could have died of natural causes, been hit by a boat, caught in a net or died of poisoning of some sort. There is no suitable veterinary analysis in Ireland yet for whales, which is something the IWDG is trying to get implemented.”As for the outcome of the body, Gareth said there are a few possibilities: “It’s either going to lie and rot or get towed out and sunk. If the body is sent to the seabed other creatures can feed off it. For example, a 70ft long whale is 70 tonnes in weight, which is basically 70 tonnes of meat. The biodiversity then feeds off that,” Gareth said.This will be an interesting find for the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group to study, as they monitor animals alive, dead and those swimming around the coast for a better understanding of the creatures around the island.Massive whale washes ashore on Donegal beach was last modified: November 7th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:arranmoreArranmore RNLIbeachedwhalelast_img read more

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Respecting Choice in Childbirth: Preferred Delivery Positions Among Ethnic Minorities in Vietnam

first_imgPosted on April 4, 2017May 9, 2017By: Cassandra Morris, Program Officer, Gender and Reproductive Health, HealthBridge Foundation of CanadaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In recent decades, Vietnam has had remarkable success in improving maternal health, with the maternal mortality ratio declining 64% between 1990 and 2013. While this decline is impressive, the national figures obscure the persistent health inequalities that exist between the Kinh ethnic majority and Vietnam’s 53 ethnic minority groups. Ethnic minority women are far more likely to deliver without the assistance of a skilled birth attendant (SBA) and face significantly higher rates of maternal mortality.For Vietnam’s ethnic minorities, their cultural preferences and traditions surrounding childbirth are often portrayed as obstacles to the uptake of maternal health services. One cultural preference that is viewed as a barrier to receiving maternal health care is the use of traditional birthing positions. During facility-based delivery, women in Vietnam (as in many countries) are expected to lie on their backs, in the supine position, to deliver their children. The supine position allows the attending health care professional to have a better, unobstructed view of the birth.Providing women-centered careThe optimal position for labor and delivery from a medical perspective has been studied extensively. While there are slight advantages and disadvantages to both supine and non-supine positions, the evidence does not support the routine use of the supine position. In fact, the World Health Organization (WHO) identified the routine use of the supine position as a practice that should be eliminated.In 2016, WHO released “Standards for Improving Quality of Maternal and Newborn Care in Health Facilities,” which recommends that health professionals encourage women to “adopt the position of their choice during labor.” Despite these recommendations, many countries and health facilities around the world continue to dictate the routine use of the supine position for childbirth. In Vietnam, the National Standard Guidelines on Reproductive Health were recently updated in an effort to improve quality of care. However, these new guidelines continue to prescribe that women lie on their backs on a delivery table during childbirth.Mandating the supine position constitutes a failure to provide a person-centered approach to maternal care as it prioritizes convenience for the SBA over the comfort of women giving birth. For some of Vietnam’s ethnic minority groups, this policy can also be culturally insensitive. A preference for traditional non-supine birth positions has been well-documented among several of Vietnam’s ethnic minority groups.Respecting women’s preferencesIn northern Vietnam, research among Thai and H’mong women highlighted the importance of traditional non-supine delivery positions. H’mong women described delivering in a sitting or squatting position, aided by the use of a low birth stool. Traditionally during labor and delivery, Thai women maintain a kneeling position while grasping a strong woven cloth – called a pieu – that is suspended from the ceiling.In the South Central Coastal region, research among the H’re and Bana groups found that women unanimously preferred to deliver in their traditional non-supine positions, which were considered more convenient and comfortable. In addition to their own experiences during labor and delivery, women expressed a belief that giving birth in the traditional position makes the infant stronger.Preferences and traditions around the time of delivery are diverse among ethnic minority groups in Vietnam. Some customs require more ingenuity or resources—for example, those that involve the use of fire. However, there are many customs that can be adapted relatively easily to ensure culturally sensitive facility delivery, including traditions surrounding placenta burial, male involvement at birth and religious practices.Providing high quality care requires utilizing evidence-based policies that respect the cultural practices, preferences and needs of ethnic minorities. Positioning cultural preferences as a barrier to overcome represents a continuation of assimilation policies directed towards ethnic minorities. If, instead, the challenges of providing culturally sensitive maternal health services are viewed as the barrier, then the responsibility is shifted towards the health sector to provide higher quality, respectful and patient-centered maternity care.—Learn more about respectful maternity care.Access publications and news articles about maternal health in Vietnam.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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