Month: April 2021

GR Wright & Sons

first_imgIndependent miller GR Wright & Sons (London) offers a US-style donut mix packed in 12kg bags. The mix produces long-life donuts with low fat pick-up. It requires the addition of yeast and water to produce golden donuts with a light, open texture, says the company.last_img

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Warburtons gets active on health

first_imgWarburtons has introduced an oat bread, said to help lower cholesterol, to its Healthy Inside range.The healthy heart claim comes from extra beta glucan in the 400g Healthy Inside Oats loaf. Warbutons’ existing Healthy Inside loaf includes inulin, derived from chicory, which encourages the formation of friendly bacteria in the gut. The firm said the so-called ’active health’ bakery segment was worth more than £17 million last year and was growing by 96% a year.The loaf, supported by PR and sampling, went on sale this month.last_img read more

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Gaining kudos in Kidderminster

first_imgA traditional small family bakery, situated in the terraced back streets of Kidderminster, Worcestershire, can trace its roots back to 1886 and still uses the same traditional recipes from over 120 years ago. Over the last year, Tony’s Bakery has been exposed to a whole new generation of bread lovers, following a listing in celebrity chef Rick Stein’s Food Heroes, and profited from the area’s emergence as a commuter belt.Kidderminster is an old industrial town but, during the last 10 years, has become home to hoards of commuters and houses have sprung up at a rapid rate. The bread at Tony’s is the main attraction, made using the sponge and dough method, and sales are on the increase, boosted by the influx of professionals in the town. At the shop in Peel Street, everything is baked from scratch and mostly by hand. “We have never lost our ethos of handmade quality products,” says owner Steve Ray.Tony’s is the only family-owned, small bakery within a 10-mile radius, surrounded by six big supermarkets. So what makes this craft business drag customers away from the the convenience of one-stop-shopping? The answer is developing a loyal customer base. “There are 1,500 customers who come every week, no matter what, and we pick up more along the way. And one customer comes all the way from Cardiff every four weeks,” says Ray.”We do a lot of advertising on the radio and in the local paper and that keeps us in people’s minds. But the best form of advertising is simply word of mouth.” For this, samples are available for customers to try. “Because they create so much interest, they become a conversation topic and it can often lead to added sales,” he says.internet aid to craftRay believes that the growth in supermarket internet shopping has helped craft businesses. “One of our customers summed it up. He said that he uses the supermarket to buy all the regular items online and then, on a Saturday, he and his wife go to the local butcher and baker and make shopping a more enjoyable experience. They know they are buying quality products.”The inclusion in Rick Stein’s Food Heroes had a positive effect on the business. “The whole bakery was recommended – the way we do things, rather than any specific product,” says Ray. “It has attracted people from further afield and also some of our former customers who used to come years ago, who then got out of the habit.”While most bakeries are switching focus to the lunchtime trade, not a single sandwich or roll is made at Tony’s. “When I took over, I couldn’t believe that my dad didn’t do sandwiches at lunchtime, so we tried it, but it was just not worth the hassle. Another lesson I learned the hard way!” Instead, the focus is firmly on the bread.convincing consumersRay is a big advocate of constantly trying out new speciality breads and maintaining availability, although it has taken some time to educate the consumer. “When I came to work here, I thought we were missing out (by not offering speciality breads), so I decided to introduce them. My first thought had been, ’Oh my dad’s baked for 30 years, but I know better and I can double takings in a week!’ So I made about six or seven different varieties. They had a mixed reaction and the amount I wasted that first week was unbelievable. I learned the hard way that you have to do it bit by bit.”The shop also specialises in a range of traditional cakes and confectionery. Little has changed in its recipes since the turn of the 20th century. One such product is the orange and marmalade cake, which was first introduced by Ray’s grandfather in 1914. However, after the start of the First World War, marmalade became scarce and production was stopped. Now it has been reintroduced and has been very well received.Though the products are not organic – “I can’t see my customers going for organic iced buns!” – much play is made of provenance. The bakery uses flour from Clarks (Wantage), a small independent flour mill, which lists the wheat’s origins right down to the farm where it was harvested. This is displayed in the shop. Ray also does demonstrations and baking sessions at local schools.So where does he see himself in 10 years? The answer is simple: right where he is now. He doesn’t want to take on another shop or expand into wholesale. He wants to be in charge.”I’m here most of the day. My customers like having the head baker in the shop, to be available to chat with them. That sort of service makes it personal. I’m absolutely convinced there will be a revival of the small family bakery. People are going for quality. If you are a small bakery now, you have an opportunity to build your business up. That’s exactly the position I’m in and I intend to be here every step of the way.” n—-=== Tony’s Bakery at a glance ===History: Established in 1886 by the current owner’s great grandfather and passed down through the family until Steve Ray and his wife, Tracy, took over 10 years ago; Ray was formerly a bakery manager and trainer for SafewayBusiness: One retail shop, no wholesale: “If you go chasing after wholesale, you can end up torn between which customers you look after more. You can either do retail – and do it well – or do wholesale well and forget the retail. I don’t think you can do both,” says Ray.Products: The standard range of sponge and dough bread is white, wholemeal and wheatmeal, with a full range of rolls. Sales of white bread far outweigh brown. The current range includes rye and six grain, tomato and garlic, cheese and onion and mixed pepper; Ray produces a vast range of confectionery products, especially fresh cream, and his best-sellers include jam doughnuts, iced buns and cream cakes. The revival of an orange and marmalade cake is proving very popular and the consistent demand for lardy cake has remained unchanged since its introduction in the 1950s.For savoury products, all the meat is roasted at the bakery. Sausage rolls are the most popular and flavours include pork and leek or tomato and garlic. These are made at the beginning of the week, frozen and baked-off. There are also Cornish pasties, a bacon and sausage wrap, and a pie range, including beef and onion, steak and kidney and chicken balti. The bakery produces around 30 celebration cakes a week, decorated by Steve and Tracy.last_img read more

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On crash dieting

first_imgNineteenth-century physician and godfather of Allinson’s bread had a hotline to the truth. A century on, his wisdom could help solve the problems of our own troubled times. If only the youth of today would listen…On crash dieting: “My young lady readers cannot do better than join a lawn tennis club and practise daily, or they may get their brother, or someone else’s brother, to take them for a run on a tandem tricycle.”last_img

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The In-Store Bakery Award

first_imgIn-store bakeries (ISBs) are perfectly placed to meet today’s consumer demands for freshly made food and retail theatre. This is why the In-store Bakery Award is such an important category at this year’s Baking Industry Awards.An integral part of the supermarket offering, the ISB gives consumers an experience to enjoy when they visit a store, whether through the smell of baking bread, the spectacle of bakers hard at work making the goods or the tasty products shoppers take home with them. For many shoppers, being able to pick up a freshly baked loaf of bread, savoury product or sweet treat is an important reason for visiting a supermarket.The ISB is also a department where retailers can experiment with innovative new lines and limited-edition, seasonal products. This enables them to quickly meet new consumer trends, such as smaller pack sizes, different flavours and healthier products. If your supermarket runs in-store bakeries which make goods for sale, please tell your managers to enter this award. The award is open to all supermarket ISBs.This award invites entries from all ISB managers who can demonstrate a well-tailored product range, good availability and ideas for maximising sales and promoting growth. In addition, judges will be looking for outstanding customer service, good team spirit and excellent management of resources or skills development.ISBs employ a huge number of people and have an important role to play in developing skills in the baking industry. Judges will be keen to hear about staff training and how this has improved the service and product range offered to customers. Perhaps one of your team has helped develop a new product or given a twist to an old favourite, which has boosted sales. If so, we want to hear about it. Equally, ISB teams that go the extra mile to ensure they have exciting bakery displays and excellent availability should also enter.Of course, customer service is one of the most important parts of a successful ISB. Do you listen to customers and use the information to tailor your offering? Perhaps you have been involved in community events or fund-raising.Entrants to last year’s award were commended by judges for ideas such as staggering bread production to offer warm fresh bread throughout the day and developing a range of muffins to meet new consumer demands.—-=== Ian Cain, bakery manager at Tesco, Meltham Lane, in Chesterfield, on winning last year ===”Winning the award cemented what I’ve always known – our team is the best in the business. We’d previously won an award for being the best in-store bakery in Tesco, but to win one for being the best in the UK is something else. It was great recognition for all the hard work that our team puts in every day.”Tesco had a plaque made with everyone’s name on to commemorate the win, which is on the wall in the bakery next to the award itself, a photo from the night and the certificate. Customers are always commenting on the display and it gives them even more confidence in what we do. It all helps build our reputation with customers.”last_img read more

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Front-of-pack salt labelling moves closer

first_imgThe Food Standards Agency has commissioned research into consumer undertsanding of salt labelling on food, ahead of proposed EU legislation to force all prepackaged food products to carry front-of-pack information highlighting salt content.Key findings from the research included confusion among consumers over the relationship between salt and sodium, with a strong overall preference for the use of the term ‘salt’ rather than ‘sodium’ on labelling information.Changes to salt and sodium labelling on food products are currently being considered both within Europe and worldwide. The European Commission is currently considering a proposal for a new regulation on the provision of food information to consumers, which proposes food products carry front-of-pack information on energy, fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates with specific reference to sugars and salt content.Earlier this month, an Environment Committee of MEPs voted in favour of the draft legislation, with a second vote due in May.A similar discussion is under way in the Codex Committee on Food and Labelling, which is currently considering the nutrients that should be listed on labels as part of the implementation of the WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health.In February, the National Diet and Nutrition Survey reported that bread is still the largest contributor of salt to people’s diets, accounting for 17% of salt intake for children and adults.last_img read more

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Former telecoms manager opens artisan bakery

first_imgBakery Andante, the brainchild of a former telecoms manager, opened this week in Edinburgh.Jon Wood has spent the past 20 years working in marketing and product management, latterly for a telecoms company, but when faced with redundancy last year he decided to turn his hobby into a new career as an artisan baker.The bakery, on Morningside Road, specialises in handshaped breads, continental breads and homebakes, using all-natural ingredients. The site features an open bakehouse so customers can see the goods being produced.“I started with making my own bread at the weekends and experimenting with loads of recipes and mastering different techniques,” commented Wood.“While it came as a disappointment at the time, being made redundant also presented an opportunity to do something different with my life. So, I took the opportunity to follow a dream and start my own business.”He said turning his hobby into a full-time bakery business has been a big learning curve, but that he has been fortunate enough to have received excellent advice and support from bakers in and around Edinburgh.“The Scottish Bakers association also allowed me to use their test bakery so that I could apply what I had learned in a commercial bakery environment.”Alan Clarke, chief executive of Scottish Bakers commented: “It is heartening to see new start-up businesses’ opening within the craft bakery sector, the landscape of the sector has changed in recent years with the expansion of out of town shopping centres and the ever larger supermarkets.”last_img read more

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Creative collaboration

first_imgNever has there been such a challenging time for businesses in the bakery manufacturing sector. The landscape has been transformed significantly over the past decade or more by a whole range of interconnected factors: global economic trends, particularly energy and transportation costs; the growth of giant supermarkets, but also of bespoke farmers’ markets; increasingly complex supply chains for food businesses, caterers and manufacturers; and, of course, the rise of the Fairtrade market and other changing food habits of the British public. More recently the credit crunch, and the recession that followed, have added further pressures on businesses.If the UK baking industry is to unlock the potential for growth, then it is not just a matter of businesses controlling costs and scrambling for what funding is out there; a more collaborative approach may be the best route to accelerate and facilitate the innovation that can both reduce costs and open up new markets. In fact, collaboration has always been present in the food and drink sector whether it’s as milk co-operatives or distribution joint ventures in the drinks industry. After the recession, the continued pressures of the economic climate mean that effective partnering will be vital to secure the development of new products and new markets.Ways of working togetherCollaboration can be achieved in many different ways and bespoke partnering arrangements can be developed, according to the specific needs of the parties involved. Large companies with big budgets, for instance, might work with small bakers to develop or market niche products, such as cupcakes or savoury pies; or small producers specialising in such product lines could collaborate together, sharing costs and market research, to allow faster and more cost-effective development, improved distribution, and wider market penetration. In such cases, three obvious structures or vehicles stand out as ideal for profit-generating initiatives.Firstly, there is simple contractual collaboration working with another party or more through a contractual framework to take a project forward. Contracts need to be as watertight as possible. But the failure of one party to perform is a key issue that has to be addressed. Also, if the project requires grant or bank funding, a formal collaboration agreement is likely to be needed to access further capital.Secondly, there is the joint venture. A separate joint venture vehicle, usually a limited company, is created to develop and commercialise a product or carry out new business activity. At the end of 2010, Finsbury Food Group entered into a joint venture deal with Genius Foods, a gluten-free bread company, with whom it already had an existing working relationship. New gluten-free products are being introduced and sold under the Genius brand. The deal shows how a joint venture can be used to open up opportunities in an emerging/growing market.In this case the joint venture also incorporates an option, granted by Finsbury, for Genius to buy the business and assets of Finsbury’s United Central Bakeries (UCB) and Livwell subsidiaries, which produce Finsbury’s gluten-free products, for a consideration of £21m, at any point within 12 months from December 2010. In the event of the option being exercised, the profit of the subsidiaries will no longer accrue to Finsbury, which will use the proceeds of the sale to repay debt amongst other things. Genius would also transfer the non-gluten-free parts of the business back to Finsbury.If your business is considering a joint venture with a collaborator, you will need to address some key issues up front: not least what each party will contribute to the company; the stake each party will receive in the company; how the company will be funded; how the joint venture company will be managed; and whether it will give the desired tax result for the partners.A third option is the partnership, which gives the advantage of separate personality, but is tax-transparent, with the tax on any profits being paid by the relevant partners rather than the partnership itself. The same issues arise for a partnership as for a joint venture company, but in addition, the partnership agreement needs to cover the share of the profits and losses that each partner will bear and when the profits will be distributed.With increasing economic, financial and social pressures, partnering, collaboration or joint ventures are likely to be the way forward for bakery businesses, particularly small producers and SMEs that sometimes supply local parts of the country or defined segments of the market. Those businesses wishing to collaborate must consider as early as possible how they will approach and resolve significant issues, such as: the precise role of each in the collaboration; who manages the project; how they communicate with each other and third parties; and how decisions are taken.Address possible difficultiesWhile the collaboration should be viewed in the most positive and optimistic light, it is also crucial that you address early on the consequences of a possible termination of the collaboration or a default, and consider what dispute resolution mechanisms you might use. Getting good legal advice at the outset can allow agreement on the most appropriate form of collaboration to be reached more quickly and ensure the commercial interests of all parties are properly protected.l Catherine Feechan is a partner in the corporate team at law firm Brodies LLP, working closely with the food and drink sector. Bakery partnerships in action A classic case of successful partnership building is London Bread & Cake Co (LBC), which has formed partnerships with three companies, writes Andrew Williams. All work out of LBC’s premises, with the latter charging for rent and management fees. Partnerships are agreed for purchasing ingredients, distribution, inter-company product sales and expertise. Because they are companies with complementary products, there are numerous financial synergies: all companies have increased sales by about 12% and reduced costs by nearly 8%.”All of this is significant in these challenging times,” says MD David Hall. “LBC believes in developing partnerships, even at a friendly level, by helping each other during power failures, fire, raw material shortages, even introducing sales enquiries to competitors if theirs is a better financial fit for a new supplier product.”In fact, it extended the theme further when it shared a stand at the IFE food show recently with Marriages Flour, to promote “vertical relationships with suppliers and customers”. It is also purchasing packaging in container quantities, selling to “friendly” local bakeries, and hopes to expand this to other services, such as engineering and technical support.However, it is worth urging caution if going down the partnering route; five years ago, LBC entered into a partnership with European Bakeries (EB), which was later declared bankrupt. “Yes, it would be true to say there was a ’partnership’ it was informal with a view to working together to go ’formal’ at a later date,” explains Hall. “We were working on dual purchasing, combined distribution and sales and shared business strategy and various personnel were assisting the other company. Unfortunately EB proved to be financially unviable, as shown by its bankruptcy a few months later.”last_img read more

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Kosciusko County Sheriff asking for help in identifying human remains found

first_img Twitter Previous articleGov. Whitmer extends State of Emergency order to May 28 in MichiganNext articleThe Tri-Way Drive-In is officially open with special permission from the state Brian Davis Facebook Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest Kosciusko County Sheriff asking for help in identifying human remains found Google+ Facebook IndianaLocalNews (“police line do not cross” by Heather, CC BY 2.0) The Kosciusko County Sheriff is asking for help from the public in identifying human remains that were found on April 2, 2020, off of State Road 13 near old Road 30, north of Pierceton.Over the past few weeks, investigators have submitted evidence for analysis. Fingerprints and DNA samples failed to produce an identification in their respective databases. DNA analysis has confirmed that the remains are of a male. Additionally, investigators believe the male subject had black hair and was approximately 5’5”.Two shirts were located with the body along with a bracelet. Police are asking for help from the public to possibly identify one or more of the items in order to make a positive identity of the victim.The first shirt is a blue, size small Vans brand long sleeve shirt. The second is a sleeveless Maple Grove black jersey type shirt.Investigators have located the original owner of the Maple Grove jersey, who advised he donated the jersey to Goodwill in 2016. Additional DNA genetic genealogy testing is currently in the process; however, results have been delayed due to COVID closures.If you have information on a possible identity please contact the Kosciusko County Sheriff’s Office at 574-267-5667. Pinterest WhatsApp By Brian Davis – May 1, 2020 0 337 last_img read more

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Consultant: lagging pay a reason South Bend is challenged at recruiting officers

first_img WhatsApp Previous articleWoman accused of running over protesters in Bloomington arrestedNext article$300M in grant funding available to eligible Michigan government groups Network Indiana Facebook Facebook IndianaLocalNews Consultant: lagging pay a reason South Bend is challenged at recruiting officers Twitter Pinterest Twitter Google+ (Jon Zimney/95.3 MNC) The city of South Bend hired an outside consulting company to review the city police department’s policies and practices in order to figure out what can be improved upon as discussions of police reform continue.21 CP has released a 67-page report detailing the changes that the South Bend Police Department should consider. The cover several topics from clarifying the department’s use of force policy, to better accountability. But, it also suggests the department find better ways to retain police officers.“These are good suggestions that our police leadership and department sees value in pursuing,” said South Bend Mayor James Mueller. “A lot of the pieces you look for are already in our current policy, but there are ways to make it clearer and make sure there is no ambiguity or confusion.”When it comes to a use of force policy, 21 CP recommends SBPD clarify that “force is justified when it is objectively reasonable.” Citing a Supreme Court ruling, the department should make it easier for an officer to understand what kind of force is appropriate and “proportional” for the given situation.The report indicates SBPD already has a policy against “bias-based policing,” but suggests taking that policy further to make it clear officers should report to their superiors when they see otherwise.As far as finding a way to better retain officers, Mayor James Muller says funding is an issue.“We are short of the number of officers where we’d like to be,” Mueller said. “That’s one reason why we are looking to adjust the compensation for our officers and make sure we can recruit and retain our good officers.”South Bend city leaders had been working on a pay raise for police officers, but that plan was tabled after the killings of George Floyd in Minneapolis and Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta that sparked mass protests that demanded police departments be defunded.21 CP says in its report that South Bend officers “suggested that compensation was a major reason” why SBPD has had a hard time recruiting and retaining officers. They also said police departments in nearby communities are offering officers better pay and economic incentives to work in areas where crime is kept at a minimum.But, acknowledging the civic and social demands of many in the community, they also recommend the city hire a more diverse crop of high-quality police officers. Google+ By Network Indiana – July 10, 2020 0 389 WhatsApp Pinterestlast_img read more

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