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Senate Accepts Min. Nagbe’s Plea

first_imgThe much-awaited appearance of Minister of Youth and Sports, Eugene Lenn Nagbe before the Senate plenary to face contempt hearing scheduled for yesterday, was placed on hold until his return to the country next Tuesday.According to a communication addressed to the Secretary of the Senate, J. Nanborlor F. Singbeh, Deputy Minister for Sports Henry Yonton, said Minister Nagbe is currently out of the country attending official duty. “He is therefore unable to appear before the Senate on March 5, as requested ….” Deputy Minister Yonton’s letter further informed the Senate that his boss will return to the country on Tuesday, March 10.“The Ministry of Youth of Sports (would) like to inform members of the Liberian Senate that as soon as the Minister returns to the country next week, he will certainly appear before the Senate plenary.”A motion to receive and make notation of the Ministry’s communication was proffered by Montserrado County Senator Geraldine Doe-Sherif, one of the 13 Senators that voted to defeat Bong County Senator Jewel Howard-Taylor’s motion for reconsideration. During its 15th day sitting last Thursday, 13 Senators voted to defeat a motion earlier proffered by Senator Taylor against the Senate decision to cite Minister Nagbe to appear before that body to show cause why he should not be held in contempt.The Bong lawmaker had argued in her letter of motion for reconsideration that the oversight committee of the Senate responsible for that ministry must be allowed to function, and that the plenary should be the last stop for action where the committee fails to resolve issues.The Senate is citing Minister Nagbe, based on a report submitted to the plenary by an Ad Hoc Sports Committee accusing the Minister of refusing to cooperate with the Committee to probe a complaint by River Cess Senator Francis Saturday Paye, over report that MYS was contemplating hosting the annual National Sports Meet.The five-member committee headed by former soccer icon George Manneh Weah, among other things, informed the plenary that Minister Nagbe, a former Secretary General of the opposition Congress for Democratic Change’s (CDC) refusal to attend the hearing was an obstruction to the work of the Senate; describing it as totally unacceptable, disrespectful, and urged his colleagues that such practice and utterance should not be encouraged.The Ad Hoc Committee further accused the former CDC Scribe and powerful strategist for George Weah, when he ventured to contest the 2005 General and Presidential Elections, “as a serious affront to the Senate,” and requested that body to intervene.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Things to know: the heir to Sharks’ Erik Karlsson is eager to face his idol

first_imgSAN JOSE — In cities across the NHL, puckheads are eagerly awaiting the opportunity to finally catch a glimpse of Rasmus Dahlin in person.Erik Karlsson is among them.Karlsson will get a front-row seat to watch the budding phenom who grew up idolizing him in Sweden when the Sharks faceoff against the Buffalo Sabres at SAP Center Thursday.“I haven’t seen him either,” Karlsson said. “It’s going to be exciting. Obviously, I’ve seen lots of clips and highlights from all over the world. It’s going …last_img read more

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First ‘Boks for Books’ library opened

first_img23 August 2013Gcobani Higher Primary School in Mdantsane in the Eastern Cape on Thursday celebrated the opening of a library provided by the South African Rugby Union’s (Saru’s) “Boks for Books” literacy campaign.The school was identified as part of Saru’s initiative to supply 23 fully-stocked mobile or refurbished libraries to previously disadvantaged schools across the country.Gcobani Higher Primary School was chosen based on a number of factors including the need for improved education in the Eastern Cape, the quality of leadership at the school, the needs of the learners and the community’s openness to the project.Rugby and readingSpeaking at the opening function on Thursday Saru vice-president Mark Alexander said that rugby, schools and education are inextricably linked.“Springboks are ultimately made at schools, but as a sport rugby emphasises the value of education,” Alexander told the gathering.“There is a critical need for basic education in our country and the provision thereof is a top-priority for our government. However, we all have a duty to join in these efforts to ensure that every child has access to a good education.Helping learners become independentGcobani principal Mrs Mjila said the library will be of great assistance to the learners as well as the community at large.“We want to ensure that our learners become independent, and this involves being able to research information for their subjects, as well as reading for pleasure to broaden their minds.”Springbok Sevens and SA under-20 wing Seabelo Senatla, SA under-20 prop Sti Sithole, and Springbok Women’s captain Mandisa Williams were among the guests at Thursday’s opening.‘Illiteracy is a challenge’Senatla, who earlier this year excelled at the IRB Junior World Championships in France and at the Rugby World Cup Sevens in Russia, said she was fortunate to have teachers at primary school who encouraged to her to read.“I know that illiteracy is a challenge, especially in rural areas, and I am therefore very pleased that Saru will make a meaningful contribution toward the development of reading skills in some of these areas,” Senatla said.The head girl of the school, 12-year-old Sisenabo Mejane, said having a library at her school “means that our brothers and sisters do not have to walk far to go and look for information.“The easy access to the library at school will also help to improve our pass rate,” she added.Other schools in area that will benefit from the libary include Isibane JPS, Zuzile JPS, Nokulunga JPS and Phumelelani SP.SAinfo reporter and SA Rugbylast_img read more

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Never Mind the Valley: Here’s Austin

first_imgTags:#Never Mind the Valley#start 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts chris cameron But something these companies have in common other than their birthplace is that they were all funded by Austin Ventures, the earliest player in the venture capital industry in the city.“Austin Ventures was pretty much the only significant game in town when it came to funding, and they knew IT software best,” says Jonas Lamis of Tech Ranch Austin, an incubator for early-stage startups. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… With help from Austin Ventures, dozens of technology companies have grown out of Austin – several of which have been acquired by top IT companies like IBM, Alcatel-Lucent, Hewlett Packard, and Sun Microsystems, to name a few. With just under $4 billion in assets, Austin Ventures has become the largest non-coastal venture capital firm in the United States.Lamis says that while a less “sexy” vertical like IT still pays the bills, its proliferation in the Austin area has been both positive and negative.“The good news is there’s a vibrant market for it,” Lamis told ReadWriteWeb. “The bad news is that consumer internet startups were missing from Austin and even today there’s very few of them.” But there are exceptions to every rule. Smaller startups like Gowalla (Alamofire), Socialware, Piryx and OtherInbox, as well as larger ones like Bazaarvoice, Spiceworks and SolarWinds have all found a home in Austin. And of course one would be remiss to forget the Austin community’s pride and joy, the interactive portion of South By Southwest (SXSW). A yearly showcase of some of the hottest startups and emerging technologies, SXSW has served as a launch pad for now ubiquitous startups like Twitter and Foursquare.Another industry thriving in the Austin startup scene is biosciences and environmental businesses, spurred by the Austin Technology Incubator at the University of Texas. In addition to IT and wireless, ATI hosts divisions devoted to helping launch startups in the clean-tech and bioscience industries. Executive Director of the Austin Wireless Alliance and ATI Director Bart Bohn says the last few years have seen a large uptake in traction for clean energy startups.“One event that signaled the transformation was the first Clean Energy Venture Summit in May of 2007 in Austin,” Bohn told ReadWriteWeb. “Thirty to forty investors came to listen to 15 or so startups, and 400 people attended. It was standing-room-only in biggest ballroom we could find.”Along with other groups such as CleanTX and the Solar Energies Entrepreneurs Network, Austin has quickly become known for clean energy innovation. Another organization, the Pecan Street Project, a coalition of various organizations and Fortune 100 companies, plans to redevelop an old municipal airport just a few miles from the UT campus into a community hooked into a smart electrical grid. Settled in the 1830s along the banks of the Colorado River and named for the Father of Texas Stephen F. Austin, the city of Austin is known for its thriving music scene and as the home of the University of Texas (UT) Longhorns. But in the past few decades, the Texas capital has built up a reputation of a different sort.With companies headquartered in Austin like Dell and Freescale Semiconductor, a spin-off of Motorola, the city has become a hotbed of information technology hardware and software. In the mid 1990s, Austin was put on the map by software companies like Motive, Vignette and Tivoli, the latter of which was quickly scooped up by IBM in 1996.RWW’s Never Mind the Valley series:AustinBangaloreBeijingBostonBoulderIsraelLondonLos AngelesNew YorkPortland This blending of unique industries in Austin is just a small part of what makes the city unique from other entrepreneurial communities like Silicon Valley. Mike Maples of Maples Investments knows the dichotomy that is the relationship between the Valley and Austin because his Silicon Valley-based agency invests roughly 20-25% of its money in Austin-based startups.“Silicon Valley is an acceleration machine for sure, but the downside is there can be a flight of talent to the winning ideas,” Maples told ReadWriteWeb. “Austin is a better place to have a stable base of people working at a company.”While Maples recognizes that Silicon Valley is a mecca for startups, he also says that arguing one over the other is like comparing apples to oranges – each has its pros and cons.“The other issue is that sometimes Silicon Valley is like 9-year-olds playing soccer, they just all chase after the ball,” says Maples. “Austin benefits from that. You get the occasional idea that no one in Silicon Valley cares about, but its a great idea.” Helping the Austin startup community take advantage of these opportunities are the numerous organizations and events in the city. Tech Ranch Austin, Capital Factory, Bootstrap Austin, Conjunctured, and the Austin Technology Incubator are just a few of the organizations working with Austin startups. Some of the more popular events in Austin include of course SXSW, Mobile Monday Austin, TeXchange, Austin Tech Happy Hour, and Ignite Austin.Maples envisions only more growth from the Austin community in the future and encourages them to not mimic Silicon Valley. Instead he suggests they jump ahead of the curve to the next big thing, which he says could be the consumerization of their already massive IT businesses.“For Austin, the opportunity is to merge software and services,” Maples says, encouraging the city to focus on what it knows best. “Always try to be your best self.”Photos by Flickr users roland and Kumar Appaiah.Special thanks to C. Enrique Ortiz, Jonas Lamis, Bart Bohn and Mike Maples for their help in gathering information for this article.last_img read more

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Glenn Spencer Praises Pitt Cancer-Surviving RB James Conner

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. OSU survived Pitt on Saturday, but that’s nothing compared to what Pitt running back James Conner has survived over the last year. Our guy Thomas Fleming wrote terrifically about Conner and his Hodgkins Lymphoma, and you should read his story if you haven’t.Conner rolled up 111 yards on 24 carries and one very questionable TD.I mean that’s just not a TD. pic.twitter.com/PRo0gGgOqs— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) September 17, 2016He was impressive no matter how you look at it. Or at least I thought so. OSU defensive coordinator Glenn Spencer did as well.“How about that running back of theirs?” Spencer said to the Oklahoman. “Gosh. I saw him after the game and I hugged his neck and said, ‘Buddy, I respect you.’ When a young man finds a purpose for playing this game, beyond the screams of the crowds or the screams of coaches, he’s dangerous. And that’s what that kid is.”I want Glenn Spencer to talk about me like that!Conner said he was bummed about the game but already moving on after Pitt’s first loss of the 2016 season.“It’s just tough,” said Conner. “We don’t like losing. We’re on to the next one. It was a hard physical run late in the game. I felt we did have momentum though. I felt good coming out of the delay. We just tried to stretch, take our pads off and stay off our feet.“They’re a great team, and we have to correct some things on offense. But hats off to them they played good on offense. I felt I could have run harder [on touchdown run]. But I’m always hard on myself.”Respect all the way around. I like Pitt. I like Conner. I love Spencer. And I’m excited to play this game again in 2017.last_img read more

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Three Things We Learned About OSU In Its 45-38 Pitt Win

first_imgThe non-conference portion of the schedule is now over, and we have learned a lot (although not everything) about this Oklahoma State team. Let’s get to three things we learned specifically on Saturday in the Pitt game.1. Even Big 12 Coaches Struggle To Make On-The-Fly FixesOne of the more interesting quotes to come out of the postgame on Saturday was this from Mike Gundy: “The lightning delay gave us a great chance to go in and redraw offense and defense, change our schemes, walk through and get prepared for the remainder of the game.”Glenn Spencer later confirmed that OSU’s defense added “a wrinkle.”The thing that stood out to me is … shouldn’t these things be happening as the game plays out? Why would you need a lightning delay to implement something? I realize that everything is going fast on the field, but I guess I would like to hear more about this taking place during the actual game.2. Ramon Richards Is MagicYou know how I always get annoyed about people calling everything the best or worst ever? Yeah, it’s kind of true with Ramon. He’s either getting housed for six or picking somebody off. Seemingly every time the ball is thrown his way.“It’s interesting, with Ramon, he seems a little bit like Shaun Lewis,” said Gundy. “He’s always in the right place at the right time. With Shaun, it seemed like every time you needed a play, he picked the ball up or intercept a pass. So far, Ramon has been in the right place in the right time.” Glenn Spencer said it best. “This hairline right here,” Spencer told the Oklahoman, “is receding because of Ramon Richards.”3. James Washington’s body control is surrealWe already pretty much knew this, but Washington’s ability to “box out” opposing corners or go get balls that are seemingly overthrown is incredible. Watch the way he goes up here, shields the defender and snatches away TD No. 2.Amazing. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.center_img 1. Oklahoma State will have issues against top-tier running backsJames Conner is an absolute grinder on the ground for Pitt, who churned out 111 yards on 4.6 per carry Saturday. Even with the defensive tackle position being as loaded as it is, the Pokes still had issues defending the run game, which could be attributed to Pitt’s pre-snap movement as much as the matchup on the line. But when you surrender 290 yards and still win, it’s a sign that there may be some issues that need cleared up. Samaje Perine and Joe Mixon would have a field day if they were to play OSU next week.2. OSU is relying on no kick return gameThe Pokes rank No. 76 nationally in kick return yardage with approximately 20.67 yards per return. I understand putting a burner in the back to field kicks like Jeff Carr who has breakaway speed, but it feels like he runs straight into a wall on every return and there’s a less than 5% chance of him breaking the first tackle. It seems they’re satisfied with below average which is a head-scratcher to me.3. No Chris Carson opens opportunities for Rennie ChildsGoing into Saturday’s contest against Pitt, Childs had six total rushing touchdowns in his entire career. He added four on Saturday along with 101 rushing yards. Chris Carson, who Mike Gundy said won’t be back “for awhile”, typically is the one getting the goal-to-go touches with his physical running style.“Rennie played the best game he’s ever played,” Mike Gundy said after the game.With Carson’s absence, Childs now has a big opportunity moving forward to build on what he started Saturday.last_img read more

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Players To Watch For Texas On Saturday

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. No. 44 Breckyn Hager, DE/OLBWhile still a rotation player at the “fox” spot on the Texas D, there’s everything to like about this 6’3”, 227 pound sophomore. With less time on the field, he’s tied for the team lead in sacks with two, refuses to get a haircut until Texas wins the Big 12, and is regularly referred to by his teammates and coaches as a “kamikaze”, “wild man” and “potentially schizophrenic” because of his style of play. Son of Britt Hager, former Texas All-American all- According to 247, Texas has had the number 7 (2016), 10 (2015), 16 (2014) and 17 (2013) recruiting classes nationally that have all been either number 1 or 2 in the Big 12. While stars don’t always translate to the field, Texas has plenty of chances for some of those ratings to be akk-urit. Let’s check out a few of them who look to be panning out.No. 7 Shane Buechele, QB and No. 18 Tyrone Swoopes, QBGundy approved the comparison on Monday to think of Buechele and Swoopes as comparable to Rudolph and Walsh circa 2015. Swoopes is a senior that’s never totally panned out as QB1 and in came freshman Buechele (who’s apparently been overcoming odds from day 1), the son of a former MLB third basemen now on the bench for the Texas Rangers. Buechele brings an arm to the job that being combined with the new offense has galvanized the unit. The 6’4”, 249 pound Swoopes is a load around the goal line and his high school tape looks like that enormous nine year old rugby playing kid.While Buechele was temporarily out with a chest injury against Cal, he made a comeback and threw for a long touchdown upon returning.No. 25 Chris Warren, RB and No. 33 D’Onta Foreman, RBThe absolutely bruising running back tandem will present a challenge the Pokes have yet to see. Thetime leading tackler and younger brother of former all-conference linebacker for Baylor Bryce Hager, his pedigree will have a hard time being denied. While he was out of place some as a true freshman, he appears to have really turned a corner this season and could be an impact player to watch. pair of high school All-Americans are 250 pounders jointly averaging 184 yards per game and pose a challenge to any defense. Warren leads the conference with 86.7 yards per game and Foreman has four straight games with over 100 yards rushing. Samaje Warren hit his stride late in the year last season and ran for 276 yards as true freshman and Foreman had himself some runs last year as well.No. 46 Malik Jefferson, LBThe freshman All-American who finished second on the team in tackles last year is the heart and soul of this Texas team. As a middle linebacker, Jefferson has tremendous speed around the edge and is as sure of a tackler as they come. He was named a preseason All-American by Sports Illustrated and Sporting News while being put on every defensive watch list a linebacker can be named on. Jefferson is unusual in how he blitzes really well, can get down in the box and stop the run that has good cover skills in the middle of the field.last_img read more

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OSU’s Offense Is a Chameleon Which Means The Defense Needs To Change With It

first_imgWhen your offense scores quickly like it was against Pitt and takes deep shots over and over again, you can completely flip a game based on one or two turnovers with your defense. Long TD. Pick. Another long TD. Bing-bang-boom. You’re up three scores. But when you’re controlling clock on offense (which OSU knew it was going to try and do against Baylor), all you want are stops because you know you can destroy a team’s will by munching up a 85-yard drive over nine minutes.So I guess my thought in all of this is that the the offensive game-plan actually seems fine (fine enough to be top 40 in the country). I’m OK with it changing based on the type of defense another team plays. I just want the type of defense OSU plays to actually change with it. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. We have seen five weeks of OSU football, and it feels like we have seen five different teams on the offensive side of the ball. It’s such a change from the “you know what you’re getting” days of Dana Holgorsen and Todd Monken. Holgorsen ran like seven plays on offense. They all almost always worked. There were variations, but it was quite simple.Mike Yurcich is more NFL-like in his play-calling. Especially in his game-planning. He was essentially shouting this from the rooftop before the Texas game.“They’re very well coached,” said Yurcich of Texas. “They have six returning starters so they have experience and some talent. They can rush the passer very well and they’re doing pretty well in the sack category. They have a lot of different fronts, a lot of different coverages, different blitz packages as well and they do a lot of things to disguise their looks. It’s a challenge going against Texas and everything that they do, so you have to be able to prepare your guys and make sure your package is complete against every situation and every look you’re going to get.“They are very good at defending the inside run. They’re stout up front and their structures and fronts take away a lot of inside runs, whether they are gap schemes or zones. They do a great job from the interior standpoint and where they’ve been hurt is the outside run, but when you get them stretched, it’s time to attack them on the inside. You can’t be exclusive or have one-dimensional-type runs.”You can’t be exclusive or have one-dimensional runs. Can you imagine Monken or Holgorsen saying something like this? Holgorsen probably snail mailed his playbook to opposing defensive coordinators just to get himself inside their heads and then ran all the plays he sent to them anyway. That’s how straightforward those teams were. They had a bunch of RPOs (™ Thomas Fleming), but they didn’t experience wild swings in offensive philosophy like it seems this one has.To be clear, I don’t think one way is necessarily better than the other — they are just very different. Yurcich continued about this after the Texas game.“Quite a few [plays were changed at the line of scrimmage],” said Yurcich. “I don’t know the exact number. The ability to get ourselves in the best situation possible, based on what their look was, was advantageous to us in that particular ballgame.”The Baylor game just a week earlier was much different. OSU looked like a Big 10 team.“We felt like the last two years we got in a track meet with them, and we couldn’t run with them,” said Mike Gundy. “And so we wanted to be able to establish some running game, use a little bit of clock with playing on the road.”“We had so many long drives, man, gave our defense a chance to recover and game plan over on the sidelines and I think Coach Yurcich called an incredible game,” added Mason Rudolph. “A lot of successful runs, a lot of play action, a lot of different stuff. We’ve just got to finish when it counts and we’ll get better, though.”Great! OSU looked strong on offense both weeks. Here’s the only problem with OSU changing its offensive plan drastically week in and week out: Philosophically, when your offense is changing from game to game, it puts pressure on your defense to change with it. But it doesn’t seem like OSU’s defense is changing.Take the Baylor game for example. OSU was taking chances against Baylor to get picks and fumbles like it always does. It tried to stop the run at the expense of what seems to be an average secondary (and I’m being kind!) Glenn Spencer talks about that here. It got housed because Baylor is good on offense (and because OSU might not be good on defense).The problem I had with this is that all you needed is, like, a stop or maybe two. You didn’t need picks like you usually do to flip a game. You should have been playing to get stops and not INTs against Baylor. OSU’s offense was manhandling that entire game, and its defense wasn’t situated properly from a philosophical standpoint. It was the same type defense it played against Pitt. But against Pitt, it got several more chances on defense to make something happen. It’s OK in a game like the Pitt game to take some chances on [email protected] if you play slower I wouldn’t be so aggressive. To me an attacking defense makes sense with tempo because the bang or bust…— Blake Huddleston (@CoachHuddleston) September 25, 2016last_img read more

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The Most Efficient Big 12 Teams And How They Compare To The SEC

first_imgWe looked last week at the most efficient Big 12 offenses and defenses, and I wanted to give an update on that after another round of games over the weekend. But I also wanted to compare those offenses and defenses to some of our beloved brethren in the SEC that so many fans, players and coaches talk about so often.But first, the Big 12’s points per drive numbers after last week.screen-shot-2016-10-12-at-10-36-45-amWest Virginia was off, and its number didn’t change, but we didn’t talk about it last week. How is a Dana Holgorsen-coached team No. 9 in offense in a pass-happy league? I do not understand. Texas Tech fell below four after going to Snyder-ville. I would like to see OSU get up in that 2.8 to 2.9 range by the time the season is over.Here is the defense.screen-shot-2016-10-12-at-10-36-51-amOSU’s offensive number fell off a tad but its defensive number improved last week against Iowa State. The Pokes are now No. 73 in the country in points per drive allowed on defense. You can look at all the numbers here.OK, on to the SEC. Mike Gundy talked about them recently at one of his press conferences.“It’s not necessarily just the Big 12 now,” said Mike Gundy recently about high-scoring games. “If you look at the SEC, which has over the years prided itself on defense, and the scores in their league are very similar to the scores in our league to a certain extent that we’re in a trend again.”This is statistically not true. That ain’t true! At the halfway point in the season, here’s how many points are being scored per game in each conference (conference games only):2016Big 12 — 70.45 pointsSEC — 50.05 pointsSo it’s not even close. But how does this compare to last year?2015Big 12 — 67.16 pointsSEC — 47.21 pointsSo while it’s true that all scores are up, the SEC is still not in the Big 12’s neighborhood when it comes to high-scoring games. Mostly because they play a more controlled, less-fast style of football. It doesn’t mean their offenses are bad (we’re about to see in a second how good some of their teams’ PPD numbers are). It just means their PPG numbers are not in the Big 12’s stratosphere.Also, just for fun, I threw in some points-per-drive numbers for four random SEC teams (including the two SEC favorites) to see where they would fit in within the Big 12. People have always incorrectly measured points per game and said “see, the SEC rocks at defense and the Big 12 stinks!” We need to look at points per drive, though.screen-shot-2016-10-12-at-10-41-16-am screen-shot-2016-10-12-at-10-41-39-amI admit this is not a perfect measurement because they are not playing common opponents, and SEC apologists would say SEC teams are doing it against tougher teams. But, for example, Georgia looks a lot less big and bad when it has a worse defense than Baylor and a worse offense than Iowa State. A&M does not seem like a national title contender when you realize it has a much less efficient offense than OSU.Also, there are no feasible measurements to make Alabama’s defense look anything other than otherworldly. That offense, too. Oh my. Ultimately this is a fun exercise pitting our conference against theirs. Don’t believe it when you hear pundits say the Big 12 doesn’t play defense or the SEC doesn’t play offense. It’s almost always a tempo thing. As these numbers reveal. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

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Essential MNCH Knowledge

first_imgPosted on December 3, 2010November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health has developed a new portal for information on MNCH, seeking to “bridg[e] the gap between knowledge and action.”On the site, you can download “Knowledge Summaries” on a variety of topics, including:What WorksPrioritize proven interventionsProvide essential commoditiesEffective Health SystemsEnable the continuum of careSupport the workforceAssure quality careEquitable FinancingCost and fund RMNCH programsStrive for universal accessAddress inequitiesParticipation & InnovationEngage across sectorsFoster innovationAccountability for ResultsAdditionally, the portal contains a customized search engine that allows users to search across various resources from over 300 organizations with information specifically focused on maternal health.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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