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U.N. march: Money for human needs, not war

first_imgNew York City activists are calling for a March 13 march on the U.N. that is meant to solidarize the anti-war movement with the Black Lives Matter movement.Under the banner “Stop the War at Home and Abroad,” the United National Antiwar Coalition will hold a protest march from New York’s busy Herald Square to the U.N., with a closing rally at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza.Other slogans include “Money for Jobs and People’s Needs, Not War,” “Rebuild Flint! Rebuild Our Cities,” “Stop Islamophobia” and “Defend the Black Lives Matter Movement.” The demonstration will feature speakers like former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark, people’s lawyer Lynne Stewart and Lawrence Hamm, of the People’s Organization for Progress.UNAC released a statement March 6, stating, “None of the major candidates for president have taken on the issue of Washington’s endless wars — unless they are defending them.”“None of these candidates,” the statement continues, “address how the cost of militarism is literally poisoning our cities. The latest budget for the Pentagon is $608 billion — while the cash-strapped city of Flint switched its water system to save money and left the children of this majority-Black city with irreversible brain damage.”In addition to the call for money to be spent on people’s needs instead of war, UNAC activists have chosen the U.N. as a target because the contamination of water is against international law.Sara Flounders of the International Action Center, one of UNAC’s coalition members, said, “We have chosen the U.N. because the Michigan authorities, by systematically and intentionally depriving Flint of clean drinking water, are in violation of international law.”This echoes the concerns of Flint residents. Melissa Mays, of the activist group Water You Fighting For, has three sons who are anemic, have daily bone pain and miss school due to compromised immune systems. She herself has seizures and other complications from drinking and using the area’s contaminated tap water.Mays told the Pacifica radio/TV show Democracy Now!: “It’s bad enough that the Geneva Convention says that as an act of war you cannot poison a city’s water supply. We’re not in war, but guess what? It kind of seems like it, because a whole city’s water supply was poisoned by our state government.” (Feb. 17)Mays is referring to Article 56, Section III of the 4th Geneva Convention of 1949, which states that the authorities have “the duty of ensuring and maintaining, with the cooperation of national and local authorities, the medical and hospital establishments and services, public health and hygiene in the occupied territory, with particular reference to the adoption and application of the prophylactic and preventive measures necessary to combat the spread of contagious diseases and epidemics.”Last week’s UNAC statement called it appropriate to cite Geneva Convention statutes that refer to an occupying power since “Flint police delivering water filters also ambushed residents with arrest warrants. What are police in communities of color but occupying forces? In the case of Flint this extended all the way to the city’s state-appointed and unelected emergency manager, given authority over the mayor and city council.”Flounders added, “The Black Lives Matter movement has proven that only the people can bring attention to society’s most pressing issues. Only the people can consistently oppose racism. Only the people can stop war, militarism and the elevation of profit over people’s needs.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Late rally edges Frogs past Oklahoma State 7-5

first_img + posts Twitter Linkedin Photo by Michael Clements Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ Previous articleSizzle Reel (Ep. 20 – Iron Fist, Reboots and more)Next articleFrogs fend off comeback in 6-5 win over OSU Branson Nelson RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook ReddIt Twitter Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ A COVID-19 Charles Schwab Challenge Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ Women’s golf heads to Oklahoma for chance at first Big 12 title World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution center_img Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ Branson Nelson Iqbal leads women’s golf to fourth-place finish at Big 12 Tournament TAGSgame wonHF in title printA four run eighth inning, consisting of two solo home runs and a two-run double, rallied TCU (15-5, 3-1) from behind to steal game one from the Oklahoma State Cowboys (15-7, 0-1) on Friday night at Lupton Stadium.Down 5-3 headed to the bottom of the eighth, the Frogs were in familiar territory. Coming into Friday’s game, the Frogs had trailed in 14 of 19 outings, compiling a 9-5 record in those games.Luken Baker led off the Frogs’ half of the eighth with his team-leading fifth homerun, pulling the Frogs within one. The homer was his first since March 3 against LSU in Houston, and it erased a 0-14 slump at the plate. Baker did not have a hit since game three against UC-Irivine, 12 days ago.Josh Watson followed Baker and was retired for the first out on one pitch. Nolan Brown stepped in the box next and hit a no-doubt line drive well over the right field fence, tying the game at five. Brown’s round-tripper was his second of the year and the team’s third of the night, marking the fifth multi-homer game this season for the Frogs.“[The homerun] helped a lot. It helped the team and it helped my confidence a lot,” Brown said. “Early on in the game I was missing fastballs a lot, so it helped a lot for my confidence of getting that off my chest.”Elliott Barzilli came up with the game knotted at five and grounded out for the second out of the eighth. Ryan Merrill followed Barzilli with a strikeout, but reached on a costly third-strike passed ball.With new life in the inning and a runner on first with two outs, Michael Landestoy pinch-hit for Connor Wanhanen and drew a walk. Austen Wade then batted with two runners on and smashed the first pitch to the left field wall for a two-run double. The double gave the Frogs the 7-5 lead and was the fourth time Wade reached base in five plate appearances.“We stayed close enough and got some big hits,” said TCU head coach Jim Schlossnagle. “The homeruns and then obviously Austen Wade staying on that ball and hitting it the other way was incredible and got us two runs, not just one, which proved to be really big in the ninth inning.”Durbin Feltman entered for the Frogs in the top of the ninth, looking for his fifth save.  He allowed the tying run to reach base thanks to a one-out single and a two-out hit batter, but got OSU’s homerun and RBI leader, Garrett Benge, to groundout to shortstop to secure the win.Winning game one sets the tone for what proves to be a pivotal Big 12 conference series for the Frogs against a team that has traditionally given them problems.“They’ve had our number for so many years in terms of winning series,” Schlossnagle said. “We certainly still haven’t done that, but it is nice to get this one especially when you are behind.”Frogs’ ace Jared Janczak got the start on the mound, entering the game with a perfect 5-0 record in five starts and a 2.36 ERA.The first two Cowboys singled off Janczak to begin the game on Friday, quite the contrast from his outing last weekend against Kansas, when it took the Jayhawks until the eighth inning to get a single baserunner.Benge came to the plate with runners on the corners in the opening frame and chopped a run-scoring groundout to Wanhanen near the first base bag. Benge recorded his 28th RBI and put TCU behind in the first inning for the 1oth time.After the two hits to open the night, Janczak settled in and retired the next nine Cowboys.Janczak’s counterpart, Cowboys’ starter Tyler Buffett, stranded five Frogs in scoring position in the first three innings alone as OSU continued to cling to the one run advantage.The Cowboys extended their lead on an unearned run off of Janczak in the fourth. A leadoff walk followed by a single and a throwing error on catcher Evan Skoug put OSU ahead 2-0. The lead held steady at two until the Frogs turn at bat in the fifth.Skoug redeemed himself with a sky-high three run homerun to right field that gave the Frogs their first lead of the night. Skoug’s homer came with one out and runners on the corners after singles by Wanhanen and Wade. The bomb was a welcome sight for the Horned Frogs and Skoug, who had struck out in 35 of 72 at-bats on the season and sported an average that had dipped below the .200 mark.“I hit a lot off the breaking ball machine this week, and it was nice to see the work pay off,” Skoug said. “My hit and then the guys’ hits down the stretch are just going to start catapulting us to be the offensive club that we know we can be.”The 3-2 lead was short-lived though, as OSU came back to tie it in the sixth. The first two Cowboys reached base, chasing Janczak from the game.Sean Wymer entered and let one of his two inherited runners to score, but an outfield assist by Wade, a strikeout, and groundout sent the game to the bottom of the sixth.The Frogs went in order in the sixth and seventh innings, sandwiching a 1-2-3 inning by the Cowboys in their half of the seventh.In the eighth inning, Wymer trotted to the mound for his third inning of work. After an 11 pitch pop-up to begin the inning, Wymer ran into trouble. Benge singled up the middle to get the rally started. Wymer then got another pop up in the infield for the second out.With two outs and just one runner on, a single followed by a passed ball put runners on second and third. A third single scored both runs, giving the Cowboys the 5-3 lead.Haylen Green replaced Wymer and got a three-pitch strikeout to end the eighth. Green ended up as the pitcher of record, picking up his first win of his career.TCU will be back on the field against OSU on Saturday at 7 p.m. at Lupton Stadium for game two of the three game series. The game will be televised nationally on ESPN 2. Nick Lodolo (2-1, 5.06 ERA) will be on the bump for the Frogs. Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Branson is a junior journalism major from Fort Worth, Texas. He enjoys writing about all sports and plans to go to law school after graduation. Linkedin Equestrian earns last seed in NCEA team bracket ReddItlast_img read more

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Bernie Madoff’s secretary wants to use new Trump law to get out of jail early

iStock/Pattanaphong Khuankaew(NEW YORK) — One of the five employees of Bernie Madoff convicted in a $20 billion Ponzi scheme is seeking early release from prison based in part on the new criminal justice reform law signed last week by President Donald Trump.Annette Bongiorno, who was Madoff’s longtime secretary, has been in prison since February 2015 and asked the judge to order her release no later than March 2019, more than a year before her scheduled release date.In a letter to U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain, defense attorneys cited the First Step Act that they contend makes Bongiorno, 70, eligible for home confinement, since she is at an advanced age and has served two-thirds of her sentence.“The new statute permits her to make a direct application to the court for this relief, and Mrs. Bongiorno respectfully makes the application,” defense attorney Roland Riopelle wrote.“She remains an ‘old fashioned’ family oriented person who would benefit greatly from the release to home confinement that the First Step Act provides,” he wrote.A spokesperson for federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York was not immediately available to respond to a request for comment on Bongiorno’s bid for early release. The office declined to comment to a similar request for comment by the Associated Press.The First Step Act, which was passed with bipartisan support and signed into law by Trump on Dec. 21, offers a number of sentencing reforms as well as expanding job training programs. Bongiorno was convicted in 2014 after a six-month trial during which she insisted she did not know her boss was running what is widely-seen as the biggest Ponzi scheme in American history.Madoff, who is now 80, is serving a 150-year sentence following conviction on a fraud that was exposed a decade ago.In his letter to the judge, Riopelle called Bongiorno a “model prisoner” who has served her sentence at FCI Coleman medium security prison in Sumterville, Florida, “without a disciplinary violation of any kind.”Riopelle said she was in decent health and in “generally good spirits” though finds the holiday season “a bit depressing.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. read more

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Coronavirus live updates: US hits fresh record highs of new cases and deaths

first_imgMyriam Borzee/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, EMILY SHAPIRO, ERIN SCHUMAKER and IVAN PEREIRA, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now infected more than 73.9 million people and killed over 1.6 million worldwide, according to real-time data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.Here’s how the news is developing Thursday. All times Eastern:Dec 17, 7:41 amTexas woman dies from COVID-19 just two months after giving birthJennifer Mendoza, of Grapevine, Texas, gave birth to her fourth child in October.A few days after coming home from the hospital with her healthy baby girl, Mendoza developed breathing problems.Mendoza returned to the emergency room and subsequently tested positive for COVID-19. She never went home.Mendoza died on Dec. 3, her 34th birthday, according to a report by Dallas ABC affiliate WFAA-TV. She is survived by her husband and four young children.“Her kids were everything,” Mendoza’s brother, David Mendoza, told WFAA in a recent interview. “To her last minute, she still kept fighting for them.”“I’m going to tell them every day for the rest of their lives that their mother was the most beautiful person on this earth,” he added, “the most compassionate and the most big-hearted.”Dec 17, 7:17 amUS on track to get 2nd vaccine as FDA panel reviews Moderna dataThe United States is on the cusp of a second vaccine for COVID-19, with a key Food and Drug Administration panel set to review data Thursday from Moderna that suggests its two-dose vaccine is safe and 94% effective.An endorsement from the independent federal advisers would pave the way for an official green light by the FDA to begin distributing next week some 5.9 million Moderna doses to the nation’s front-line health care workers and nursing home residents. An internal assessment by the FDA already found that the Moderna data show the benefits likely outweigh the risks.The Moderna batch would be in addition to the 6.4 million doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine that started to roll out this week after being the first to get emergency-use authorization.One primary difference is that the Modern vaccine requires fewer specific handling instructions because it does not need ultra-cold storage conditions like the Pfizer/BioNTech one.Moderna also is seeking authorization to use its vaccine on people ages 18 and older, whereas Pfizer’s enrollment of older teens in clinical trials this fall paved the way for authorization of anyone 16 and older.Dec 17, 6:35 amFrench president’s wife is self-isolating but has no symptomsBrigitte Macron, the 67-year-old wife of French President Emmanuel Macron, is self-isolating and will be tested for COVID-19 soon, although she is not showing any symptoms, her office said in a statement Thursday.France’s presidential palace had announced earlier that Emmanuel Macron, 42, tested positive for COVID-19 and is self-isolating.“Brigitte Macron is a contact case and has no symptoms of the disease,” her office said. “She also tested negative for Covid-19 on Tuesday, December 15, before making a visit to a pediatric ward at Saint-Louis Hospital in Paris. She has placed herself in isolation and will continue her work by videoconference. She will be tested very soon as a precaution.”Dec 17, 6:09 amAlaska health care worker suffers ‘serious’ allergic reaction to Pfizer/BioNTech vaccineAn Alaska health care worker was hospitalized Wednesday, shortly after receiving the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.The unnamed staff member at Bartlett Regional Hospital in Juneau, Alaska, “showed signs of an anaphylactic reaction” 10 minutes after inoculation, “with increased heartbeat, shortness of breath and skin rash and redness,” according to a press release.“She was given epinephrine and Benadryl, admitted to the hospital, and put on an intravenous epinephrine drip,” Bartlett Regional Hospital said in a statement Wednesday night. “Her reaction was serious but not life threatening.”The staff member, who had no known previous allergies or adverse reactions to vaccines, “is recovering and will remain another night in the hospital under observation,” according to the press release.“She is still encouraging her colleagues to get the vaccine,” the hospital said.It’s the first known adverse allergic reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine developed by U.S. pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech, which was granted emergency-use authorization in the United States last Friday.A second staff member at Bartlett Regional Hospital “experienced eye puffiness, light headedness, and scratchy throat” 10 minutes after being injected with the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine on Wednesday, according to the press release.“His reaction was not considered anaphylaxis,” Bartlett Regional Hospital said in the statement Wednesday night. “He was taken to the Emergency Department and administered epinephrine, Pepcid and Benadryl. He felt completely back to normal within an hour and was released.”“He too does not want his experience to have a negative impact on his colleagues lining up for the vaccine,” the hospital added.Both incidents were reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which Bartlett Regional Hospital said “is providing guidance and support.” The symptoms in each case were discovered during the 15-minute observation period after inoculation recommended by the CDC.“We were expecting these things and we had all the right systems in place,” Charlee Gribbon, an infection control practitioner at Bartlett Regional Hospital, who is overseeing a mass operation to vaccinate as many staff as possible, said in a statement Wednesday night.Alaska’s Chief Medical Officer Anne Zink said there are “no plans to change our vaccine schedule, dosing or regimen.”Dec 17, 5:16 amFrench President Emmanuel Macron tests positiveFrench President Emmanuel Macron has tested positive for COVID-19.The Elysee Palace, the official residence of the president of France, announced Macron’s diagnosis in a statement Thursday morning.“This diagnosis was established following an RTPCR test performed at the onset of the first symptoms,” the palace said.Macron will self-isolate for seven days in accordance with public health instructions.“He will continue to work and carry out his activities remotely,” the palace said.With more than 2.4 million diagnosed cases of COVID-19, France has the fifth-highest tally in the world, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Dec 17, 4:30 amA record 113,069 Americans are currently hospitalized with COVID-19There were 113,069 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 across the United States on Wednesday, according to data compiled by The COVID Tracking Project, a volunteer-run effort to track the U.S. outbreak.It’s the highest number of current COVID-19 hospitalizations that the U.S. has logged since the start of the pandemic.Dec 17, 4:08 amUS hits fresh record highs of 247,403 new cases and 3,656 deathsThere were 247,403 new cases of COVID-19 confirmed in the United States on Wednesday, marking a fresh record high, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.It’s the 44th straight day that the U.S. has reported over 100,000 newly diagnosed infections. Wednesday’s tally shatters the country’s previous all-time high of 231,775 new cases confirmed on Dec. 11, according to Johns Hopkins data.An additional 3,656 deaths from the disease were also registered nationwide on Wednesday, setting yet another record. It’s only the fourth time since the pandemic began that the country has reported more than 3,000 COVID-19 deaths in a single day. The country’s previous peak of 3,300 fatalities was recorded on Dec. 11, according to Johns Hopkins data.A total of 16,979,777 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 307,501 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins data. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.Much of the country was under lockdown by the end of March as the first wave of pandemic hit. By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up over the summer.The numbers lingered around 40,000 to 50,000 from mid-August through early October before surging again to record levels, crossing 100,000 for the first time on Nov. 4 and reaching 200,000 for the first time on Nov. 27.Dec 17, 12:06 amInterior Secretary David Bernhardt tests positive for COVID-19Interior Department Secretary David Bernhardt has tested positive for COVID-19. The department spokesman, Nicholas Goodwin, confirmed the news Wednesday, after an inquiry from The Washington Post.Bernhardt received his test results prior to President Donald Trump’s Cabinet meeting Wednesday and did not attend the session.“He is currently asymptomatic and will continue to work on behalf of the American people while in quarantine,” Goodwin said in an email.As a result of Bernhardt’s diagnosis, various high-ranking department officials who were in close contact with him this week are now getting tested.He is the third top official at the department known to have tested positive for the virus since November. Interior’s top attorney, Daniel Jorjani, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Aurelia Skipwith also tested positive.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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You gotta have faith! Estate agency welcomes huge George Michael mural on side of branch

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » You gotta have faith! Estate agency welcomes huge George Michael mural on side of branch previous nextAgencies & PeopleYou gotta have faith! Estate agency welcomes huge George Michael mural on side of branchNine-metre high memorial to the Wham singer will give the area of London where the singer grew up a lift, says branch manager.Nigel Lewis21st September 202001,626 Views An estate agency in North London has welcomed a huge mural painted on the side of its branch as a memorial to popstar George Michael, who lived and went to school in the area during his early years before fame beckoned.The former Wham star died of natural causes aged 53 on Christmas Day 2016.The nine-metre high mural, which takes up the whole of the side of Winkworth’s Kingsbury branch, took artist Dawn Mellor three weeks to paint and is part of an outdoor arts festival organised by the local council.The mural has generated considerable publicity over the weekend including coverage by the BBC and Daily Mail, all of which has delighted Ajay Bathija (pictured above with hi steam), a director of the Winkworth Kingsbury estate agency.“I think it is fabulous. It is great for the area and has created a real buzz among all the residents and the businesses here,” he told The Negotiator.“Since it was unveiled, we have seen a steady stream of people taking pictures of the mural.“We all supported the artist while she was working on the mural, offering her cups of tea while local restaurants brought her food.  It’s been really well received and is already attracting visitors to Kingsbury – a real uplift for everyone who works and lives here.”The mural includes references to several George Michael hits including Careless Whisper but also a monopoly board. The game’s creator Waddington has no links to the area, but it might be a gentle ‘thank you’ to the Winkworth team for their cups of tea.Read more about Winkworth.george michael Brent Brent Council winkworth September 21, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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Attorney General Zoeller Warns Political Campaigns, PACs And Hoosiers On Robocalling

first_img INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller is warning political campaigns and political groups to adhere to state telephone privacy laws and refrain from robocalling residents leading up to the 2016 General Election on November 8. Zoeller also warns Hoosiers against such calls that are illegal if there isn’t a live operator that obtains your permission before playing a recorded message.Zoeller’s office enforces the state’s telephone privacy laws and investigates complaints about robocalls and other unwanted calls. His office has received nearly 14,000 complaints about unwanted calls in 2016, a majority of which were about robocalls.“In Indiana, our Legislature has adopted one of the strictest laws that strictly prohibits the use of auto dialers which can blast out prerecorded messages at a rate of ten thousand per minute.  Just as in past years we are warning campaigns, PACs and political parties not to use this technology used by scam artists,” Zoeller said. “If violated, there are penalties and I will pursue those who chose to disregard the privacy of our citizens.”Indiana’s Auto Dialer law, 24-5-14-5(b), restricts the use of technology that automatically dials residential phone numbers and plays prerecorded messages, also called robocalls. The penalty for violating the Indiana Auto Dialer law is up to $5,000 per call.If campaigns want to play a prerecorded message, a live operator must first have initiated the call and received the recipient’s permission, either by a prerecorded request to leave a message or the recipient must have previously opted into receiving such calls.If an individual does not want to receive automated political voice mails, they should make it clear in their voice mail or answering machine prompt that they only wish to receive the name and number of the person calling. When a voice mail prompt invites a message to be left, it provides permission for a prerecorded message to be left.Campaigns and political groups are allowed to make traditional “live” calls, even to numbers registered on the Do Not Call list, as long as the calls are not sales calls.Zoeller said if someone receives an unwanted campaign call, simply ask to be removed from the caller’s list. To block general telemarketing calls, sign up for the Do Not Call list at www.IndianaConsumer.com or by calling 1.888.834.9969.Members of the public can also utilize this call-blocking reference sheet for additional call-blocking applications. Frequently asked questions about Indiana’s Do Not Call law can be found here.Indiana residents who receive a political robocall or any other unwanted call can file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Office by visiting www.IndianaConsumer.com or calling 1.888.834.9969.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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OCPD Weekly Activity Report 3/27- 4/2

first_img  April 2, 2016: Saturday Calls for service: 61Motor Vehicle Stops: 18  Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0  Property Checks: 18   Alarms: 3The Police Department assisted with 4 fire and 4 EMS callsWarrant, 3400 block Bay Ave., one in custody, at 9:31am March 30, 2016: WednesdayCalls for service: 67Motor Vehicle Stops: 21     Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0   Property Checks: 23      Alarms: 1The Police Department assisted with 6 fire and 6 EMS calls Warrant, 500 block Wesley Ave., one in custody, at 2:05pm Warrant, 400 block 30th St., one in custody, at 1:20pm March31, 2016: ThursdayCalls for service: 65Motor Vehicle Stops: 10 Motor Vehicle Accidents: 1    Property Checks: 28       Alarms: 2The Police Department assisted with 5 fire and 5 EMS callsWarrant, 400 block West Ave., one in custody, at 12:48amCriminal mischief, 400 block Haven Ave., at 3:33pmMotor vehicle accident, 20th St. & Asbury Ave., at 5:00pmCDS, 1000 block Central Ave., one in custody, at 6:40pm Warrant, 800 block Central Ave., one in custody, at 7:30pm Warrant, 900 block West Ave., one in custody, at 1:38am Theft, 800 block West Ave., one in custody, at 4:44pm Warrant, 700 block Atlantic Ave., one in custody, at 7:21pm  March 29, 2016: TuesdayCalls for service: 87Motor Vehicle Stops: 30   Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0    Property Checks: 25     Alarms: 0The Police Department assisted with 3 fire and 6 EMS calls Calls for Service: 493          Daily Average: 70 March 27, 2016: Sunday                                                Calls for service: 67Motor Vehicle Stops: 16     Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0    Property Checks: 33      Alarms: 0The Police Department assisted with 3 Fire and 4 EMS callsCDS, Clipper Dr., at 10:22am Burglary, 2200 block Wesley Ave., at 10:09pm April 1, 2016Calls for service: 60Motor Vehicle Stops: 20  Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0    Property Checks: 18   Alarms: 2The Police Department assisted with 6 fire and 5 EMS calls Warrant, 34th St., one in custody, at 2:56pm Theft, 200 block Bay Ave., at 6:36pm PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS:Just a reminder that it is a violation of a City Ordinance to have dogs on the boardwalk anytime during the year. March 28, 2016: Monday Motor Vehicle Stops: 28   Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0   Property Checks: 29      Alarms: 4Calls for service: 85 The Police Department assisted with 6 Fire and 4 EMS calls City Ordinance 87-17sec.4-32 prohibits any Boat/Trailer over 22 feet in overall length from being parked on a city street.       Any boat/trailer less than 22 feet in overall length can only remain on a city street for three consecutive days. Officers will be issuing summons and towing boats/trailers for any observed violations.last_img read more

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Walk for Wounded Sept. 22 in Ocean City

first_imgOn Saturday, Sept. 22, Operation First Response marks an important milestone: the 10th Annual Walk for the Wounded on the Ocean City Boardwalk. Since Ocean City’s first Walk for the Wounded in 2009, hundreds of thousands of dollars have been raised to help Operation First Response offer financial and emotional support to injured soldiers and their families.“We’ve raised funds and awareness for the plight of injured soldiers, but there is still plenty of work to be done,” said Tricia Ciliberto of the 2018 Walk for the Wounded Committee. “We hope to make this year’s event the milestone our heroes deserve.”There are a number of ways to contribute to the success of the 10th Annual Walk, according to Ciliberto. “Businesses can invest in a sponsorship or an ad in the dedication booklet, and individuals can organize a team of walkers or register individually for the Walk,” she explained.Former Army Sgt. Jesse Wallace, who lost his right leg in combat in Afghanistan, rode a recumbent cycle to lead the Walk for the Wounded.One truly enjoyable way to contribute to the Walk is to attend Family Day at Playland’s Castaway Cove on Friday, Aug. 10, from 1 to 5 pm. The amusement pier, located at 1020 Boardwalk, will sell unlimited ride wristbands for $15 each. All rides except the Gale Force roller coaster are included, and one hundred percent of the proceeds benefit Walk for the Wounded.The funds raised at Walk for the Wounded will help Operation First Response, rated a four-star charity by Charity Navigator, support wounded soldiers in times of crisis. More than 97 cents of every dollar raised will be donated directly to injured soldiers who are facing financial, physical, and emotional struggles. To learn more about Walk for the Wounded sponsorships, advertising opportunities, or registration, please contact Tricia Ciliberto at (609) 402-5190, or visit www.OperationFirstResponse.com.last_img read more

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What’s next for climate change policy

first_imgRegulations to fight climate change likely will be casualties of the incoming Trump administration, but environmental experts taking stock of the changing American political landscape said that work in the field will continue elsewhere and that a broad-based rollback of U.S. environmental protection will prove easier said than done.Though President-elect Donald Trump hasn’t yet announced an environmental agenda, his campaign claim that climate change is an expensive hoax, his blanket support for the fossil fuel industry, and his criticism of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have environmentalists worried.In addition, Republicans have majorities in the House and Senate, and they generally believe that environmental regulations can harm economic growth and improperly extend the reach of government. So environmentalists foresee a broad attack on the nation’s framework of environmental regulations.Still, Harvard environmental experts forecast a complex mosaic for the years ahead, one that has problems and likely is rife with litigation, but that also continues momentum toward a cleaner world because of a combination of market forces, economic factors, and continued efforts by other nations, states, and local governments.“Trump could unilaterally withdraw from the Paris Agreement, renouncing U.S. leadership on international climate negotiations. And he could try to rescind or weaken some important regulations, like the Clean Power Plan,” said Jody Freeman, the Archibald Cox Professor of Law and director of Harvard Law School’s Environmental Law Program. “But any effort to fully unravel the substantial and meaningful regulatory initiatives of the last eight years will be long, complicated, and difficult, and in the end likely only partial because of the significant legal, political, and practical barriers to doing so.” For President Trump, the road ahead Related Harvard analysts ponder changes across the American and global landscapes Federal environmental agencies likely are in for tough times, even without new laws being passed or existing ones repealed, the analysts said. The power to make political appointments and set budgets means an agency easily can be slowed by underfunding or new leadership hostile to its mission.Daniel Schrag, the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, professor of environmental sciences and engineering, and head of the Harvard University Center for the Environment said it’s hard to project just what effect Trump’s presidency will have on global climate efforts. The effects of climate change are so enormous that the actions of any one nation over four years will have limited impact.“It’s a long march to a low-carbon world,” Schrag said. “We knew it wasn’t going to be easy. Being successful means being able to weather setbacks like this one.”It’s even possible, he said, that a federal agenda the public sees as too hostile to climate change action could spark a backlash that leads to new reforms.“I don’t know how you get from here to there,” Schrag said. “[But] there’s always a path forward.”Freeman acknowledged there is a “long list of worst-case scenarios” but cautioned against taking campaign rhetoric at face value. It doesn’t appear the president-elect has been fully briefed on climate science or fully considered the impact that withdrawing from the Paris Agreement on climate change would have on our relationships with other nations, she said.“The truth is, we don’t entirely really know what President Trump will do on climate, energy, and environment,” Freeman said. “His positions on other issues have changed, and that might happen here too. It is entirely possible that he will conclude that he can achieve his domestic energy agenda without jettisoning Paris, and he might even be persuaded that it makes more sense to embrace the international goal of emission reductions, but say he has a better way to get there than by Obama-style regulation. In other words, we must wait for the dust to settle.”Here, then, is the tote board for what so far seems likeliest to happen on climate change issues:Clean power and ParisThe most probable casualties of the incoming administration are recent U.S. steps to fight climate change in the energy sector, and the United States’ leadership in the international community on the issue.Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which seeks to shift electricity generation in the United States away from polluting sources such as coal, is currently being reviewed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. If its decision supports the plan and is appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, it would likely fail, since Trump has said he will appoint a conservative justice to fill the current high court vacancy.A simpler solution might be for the administration to withdraw the Clean Power Plan and replace it with a less-stringent version, which would be within the new president’s power, Freeman said in an analysis of the environmental ramifications of a Trump presidency.Another probable target is the Paris Agreement, which Trump said he would cancel. While upending the entire agreement, negotiated by 195 countries, is beyond his power, Trump could withdraw the United States’ participation. Since the agreement has taken effect, that process would take four years to accomplish, according to Robert Stavins, the Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government and head of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements.Alternatively, Trump also could submit the plan to the U.S. Senate to ratify, where it most likely would fail, Stavins said.The most dramatic option for a Trump administration would be to try to remove the United States from the underlying Framework Convention on Climate Change, signed by President George H.W. Bush and ratified by the Senate in 1992, Stavins said. That would remove this nation from the Paris Agreement in just a year. But there are serious questions with that approach regarding how the necessary legal steps and the political implications might play out.Stavins said that the simplest way to render U.S. participation in the Paris Agreement meaningless, however, would be to announce the country will not comply with the pact’s carbon emission reductions — which are essentially voluntary. Obama set the reduction target at between 26 and 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.The international impactThe loss of the U.S. leadership internationally on climate change could convince other nations not to honor their own commitments, and will “certainly not encourage greater action,” Stavins said. But for those states committed to climate action, that wouldn’t necessarily slow their progress.Mike McElroy, the Gilbert Butler Professor of Environmental Studies and head of the Harvard China Project, said China most likely will continue to reduce its emissions regardless of what the United States does, because Chinese action is driven in part by rampant air pollution that the nation’s leadership has committed to address. The solutions there overlap with those for climate change.A hazard for U.S. industry, McElroy said, would be that, in addition to climate impact, the country likely would cede leadership in developing the energy technology of tomorrow.The future for coalWhatever the eventual U.S. positions on climate and the environment, it will be tough for Trump to reverse the coal industry’s decline, the experts said, even though he has been a dogged backer of coal’s future. Market forces, not environmental regulation or political shifting, have hurt the industry most. Advances in fracking technology have brought vast new supplies of natural gas to the market, driving prices down and undercutting coal. In fact, Stavins said, Trump’s pledged support for fracking could wind up hurting coal further.Prospects for renewable powerAt least in the short term, wind and solar power generation likely will be shielded by existing tax incentives and state renewable energy policies. The federal incentives extend to 2019 for wind and 2023 for solar. The state policies include requirements that a portion of electricity supply come from clean sources, ensuring continued demand: “There is a broad national consensus that renewable energy is an important investment for the country,” McElroy said.In addition, windy states in the middle of the country — from the Canadian border down to Texas — will likely support a continuation of the tax incentives into the future, Schrag said.Regulation at lower government levelsA shift in the federal government’s stance on climate and energy also won’t automatically reverse local, state, and regional action, McElroy said. California, with the nation’s largest economy, has already adopted a cap-and-trade system to reduce carbon emissions and lower its carbon footprint.Cities are also taking steps to address climate change and have banded together to form a global climate action network, McElroy said.The Environmental Protection AgencyA likely target of the administration and Congress is the EPA, the federal agency charged with enforcing America’s environmental laws. It is unlikely that the EPA would be abolished outright, since Senate Democrats have enough seats to block such a move through filibuster, according to Stavins and Freeman.But a lot of damage can be done by naming leaders antagonistic to the agency’s mission and by starving it of funding, Schrag said. Trump has already named a climate change skeptic, Myron Ebell, to oversee the transition at EPA.Though attention is often focused on an agency’s top leadership, Stavins pointed out that there are also hundreds of political appointees who will take important positions within the administration and influence its work over the next four years.“That may be my greatest worry,” Stavins said.Funding for climate science researchFederal budgets have been tight for years, and funding constrained for all kinds of science. But if the new Congress adopts an anti-climate-change stance and seeks even deeper budget cuts, funding for climate research could be targeted, Schrag said.If that’s the case, Schrag said, there’s an opportunity for institutions like Harvard to pick up the slack, as the University did in supporting stem cell research and establishing the Harvard Stem Cell Institute during the Bush administration.“We’re not there yet, but if President Trump chooses to slash NASA, NOAA, NSF budgets for climate research, I think there’s an opportunity for universities like Harvard … to step up and say ‘This is important to the world,’” Schrag said, referencing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Science Foundation. “Obviously, we should hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.”Other environmental regulationsAnother important area of influence, Freeman said, is in promulgating regulations.The administration has the power to review regulations that implement environmental laws, and can decide to rescind them, Freeman said. That power, however, isn’t unfettered, as the administration has to justify its actions — in court if challenged — and must observe existing laws, even those that require it to issue environmental regulations.“There is no question that there will be a regulatory rollback, but its scope is still unknown,” Freeman said. “And there is no question that the rhetoric and politics of the next four years will not sound or feel anything like the eight years of the Obama administration, when climate change was at the very top of the domestic and international agenda. But while the environmental community should prepare for the worst, it should be open to the possibility that the most dire predictions may not come true, and help nudge the new president to a softer landing.”The uncertain future of energy and climate Harvard Professor Michael McElroy discusses a world without fossil fuels, the economics of changing energy systems, and the impact President-elect Donald Trump may have on the future of energy and climate.last_img read more

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The Awesome ‘80s Prom Starts Performances

first_img The Awesome ‘80s Prom will light up the dance floor for five Saturday performances through September 20. Break out your glowsticks and pop open your wine coolers, because The Awesome ‘80s Prom is back! The interactive show that’s part comedy, part dance party, returns to New York beginning May 17 at 42West. It initially opened off-Broadway in July 2004 at Webster Hall before transferring to The Wall in July 2013, where it ran through November of that year. Written and directed by Ken Davenport, The Awesome ‘80s Prom is a blast-from-the-past party set at Wanaget High’s Senior Prom in 1989, featuring an American Idol-style contest for the titles of Prom King and Queen, and the ‘80s hits “Wake Me Up Before You Go Go,” “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun” and more.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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