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Honey Creek Watershed Protection Project Closes Out

first_img SHARE Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Jul 10, 2012 Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Honey Creek Watershed Protection Project Closes Out Previous articleSeed Consultants Market Wrap Up 7/10/12 with Gary WilhemiNext articleHouse Ag Set to Get Started on Farm Bill Andy Eubank Almost two years to the day after USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack’s visit to Indiana to announce national and state funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, the Honey Creek Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Project in Vigo County celebrated its completion.  Jane Hardisty, State Conservationist for the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service congratulated the project’s local partners and sponsors at a celebration held today at the Vigo County Fairgrounds.Hardisty said, “This area has long experienced recurring, disastrous flooding.  The 2008 flood was especially devastating, claiming the lives of three local residents and causing over one billion dollars in damages.  Completion of this watershed project provides flood protection from 100-year, 24-hour storm events and will also positively impact thousands of residents and businesses in the southern part of Vigo County.”Working with key local sponsors, the Honey Creek-Vigo Conservancy District and the Vigo County Soil and Water Conservation District, NRCS applied for and received 3.3 million dollars in ARRA funding in 2009 to complete the third and most costly phase of the project located along Thompson Ditch.  Local sponsors raised another 1.8 million in matching dollars.  These funds allowed NRCS to provide engineering and technical assistance to construct the 3.6 miles of flood control dikes and concrete floodwalls.  Earlier phases of project construction were completed earlier and were located along Honey Creek.  It is estimated that the completion of this long-term project will contribute about $1.97 million in annual benefits to the economic growth of the area.Hardisty praised the leaders of the conservancy district and the SWCD for their dedication to and investment in this huge project.  She presented conservation appreciation plaques to Rick Jenkins, Chair of the Honey Creek-Vigo Conservancy District and Charlie Hendricks, Chair of the Vigo County SWCD.  Hardisty also recognized NRCS staff Eddy Adams (District Conservationist), Denise Held (Civil Engineer), Chris Ritz (Civil Engineer), Mike Cox (State Conservation Engineer), and Alyson Keaton (Contract Specialist) and thanked them for their excellent work.Hardisty said, “We are all grateful for the opportunity to help this community and provide a better quality of life for the residents and business owners of this area.  Without strong local leadership and the ARRA funds, the project would have not happened.”For more information about the ARRA of 2009, visit www.recovery.gov.  For more information about NRCS flood prevention and control projects, visit their website.Source: NRCS Honey Creek Watershed Protection Project Closes Outlast_img read more

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New owners to renovate Bunratty Shannon Shamrock

first_imgTies between Shannon Free Zone and the Chinese Government stronger than ever No plans for Bunratty theme park NewsNew owners to renovate Bunratty Shannon ShamrockBy Staff Reporter – April 13, 2017 4172 TAGSBunrattyShannon Shamrock Email Awards a real trip for Bunratty Shannon & Bunratty special feature: The man with two names tells tall tales of how it used to be Big investment lined up for Bunratty tourist attraction RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twittercenter_img Print Plans are afoot to reopen the Bunratty Shannon Shamrock hotelFAMED in its heyday for hosting airline crews from around the world, Bunratty’s Shannon Shamrock could once again find itself back in the social limelight as plans are afoot to reopen the hotel.Crescent House Limited, whose directors include Patrick and Mary Hoare, are to seek planning permission from Clare County Council to carry out renovation works at the hotel.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Last Friday, planning notices were erected on the site of the Bunratty hotel which has been closed since 2009 as a new operator couldn’t be secured to take over operations.However, it has since emerged that planning is being sought for the partial demolition of existing structures at the rear of the building and for refurbishment and reconfiguration of the existing hotel including its 55 rooms, kitchens and bars as well as to convert the swimming pool to a function room.Castle House Limited will also seek to carry out work on meeting rooms, a conservatory, the car park and the hotel’s surrounding landscape at the Bunratty site. Advertisement Linkedin WhatsApp Previous articleJazz singer Sue Rynhart at Dolan’sNext articleOpen through Easter, D&M Garden Centre and Restaurant Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie History continues to be made at Bunratty Facebooklast_img read more

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Digitalisation Of Indian Courts, Mitigating The Hurdles Amid Outbreak Of Covid 19 With Post Lockdown Approach

first_imgColumnsDigitalisation Of Indian Courts, Mitigating The Hurdles Amid Outbreak Of Covid 19 With Post Lockdown Approach Kartik Dabas1 May 2020 12:37 AMShare This – xThe outbreak of Covid 19 from the Chinese City of Wuhan to more than 200 countries till date, hardly needs any discussion. Noval Coronavirus which appears to be deadlier than any other seasonal influenza, seems to be over for China, but the rest of the World is still grappling with the virus outbreak and so is India. The outbreak and its spread have shuttered many countries, paralyzed…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe outbreak of Covid 19 from the Chinese City of Wuhan to more than 200 countries till date, hardly needs any discussion. Noval Coronavirus which appears to be deadlier than any other seasonal influenza, seems to be over for China, but the rest of the World is still grappling with the virus outbreak and so is India. The outbreak and its spread have shuttered many countries, paralyzed their economies and has affected everyday lives. The Judicial System of these Countries is being altered to maintain public safety, similarly India is emphasising on digitalisation of Courts to carry out its functioning, but without acknowledging the low technological literacy. The Supreme Court of India exercising its plenary power under Article 142 of the Constitution of India has laid down the guidelines for the Court’s functioning across the Country, but the technological and constitutional hurdles on the digital highway remains unanswered and need to be mitigated, especially considering the post lockdown resumption of court work, as this Virus will be with us for long and digital Court’s may be the new normal. The digitalisation of the Indian Courts during the pandemic, reminds me of the digitalisation project for Indian Courts which was first floated in 2005. The project was headed by Dr Bharuka (Former Hon’ble High Court Judge, State of Karnataka). In its first stage digitalisation project created computer centres and server rooms in all 15,000 courts operating from 2500 court complexes in India. The Second stage focused upon ICT coverage and the third on the information gateways among courts, agencies and departments. We are in the second stage of the transformation, but its due to the outbreak which has expedited the debate and talks of complete digitalisation of the judicial system. The primary challenge for the complete digitalisation of Indian Courts is to further the concept of ‘principle of open justice’. The common law concept encourages for court proceedings to be open and transparent to public, and is a cardinal feature of our judicial process. Amid the pandemic, Court functioning through video conferences has diluted this very principle and Court’s decisions are not reaching the masses, for whom the law is actually for. However, if seldom any, they are in form of snippets, articles through press and telecom media. This does not further the concept of open justice. The solution herein lies in a comparative analysis of judicial systems of different countries like US, UK and EU who have opted for Web Broadcasting and live streaming of the cases of national importance on dedicated channels. Availability of audio-visual recording on the Court’s Website will also strengthens the concept of open justice and these must be emphasised upon, especially when the lockdown is lifted as digital courts are bound to be the new normal. Even the Supreme Court Bar Association is of the similar view and suggested for the daily transcription of Court proceedings while referring to the cases of Naresh Sridhar Mirajkar vs State of Maharastra and Swapnil Tripathi vs Union of India. The idea of digital Courts sounds alluring amid the outbreak of Covid -19, but there are other technological challenges as well. Here the technology seems to trip itself over because the hurdles so created by itself, such as like the mammoth of the data which will be collected, collated and stored needs to be protected through proper encryption techniques, particularly when deposition in vulnerable and confidential cases. Though creating a virtual court room is economical and easy but the challenges like, adequate encryption and security when dealing with a confidential case, absence of e – signatures, e – attestations, e – vakalatnamas are the technological void and are major challenges for complete digitalisation of courts. Lack of technological literacy makes the judges, lawyers and clients equally vulnerable to cyber-attacks, recently the advisory issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs has banned the Zoom video conferencing application for government purposes. At last the professional life of budding lawyers needs special attention, here State Bar Councils in coordination with respective Bar Associations can provide for dedicated digital video conferences spaces / rooms in the Court complexes and consequently following the Covid-19 guidelines post the lockdown, so that the requiring lawyers can use the same. It is unquestionable that ICT can play a vital role in facilitating the Court’s function during the pandemic but highlighted shortcomings have to be addressed and adequately mitigated.Views Are Personal Only(Author is practicing Lawyer at Supreme Court) Next Storylast_img read more

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Brundidge gets FEMA grant for fire truck

first_imgSkip Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day By Jaine Treadwell Brundidge gets FEMA grant for fire truck Sponsored Content By The Penny Hoarder Latest Stories You Might Like Child Nutrition Program funding in question The Pike County Board of Education approved Monday the request of the Child Nutrition Program (CNP) to provide lunch as… read more The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Published 6:34 pm Tuesday, April 16, 2013center_img Book Nook to reopen Print Article Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Email the author Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel The Brundidge City Council received good news at its Tuesday meeting.The city has received a FEMA Fire Fighters Assistance Grant that makes funds available to purchase a fire truck for the city’s volunteer fire department.Brundidge City Manager Britt Thomas said the grant award is for $228,000 with the city’s match at $23,400.Thomas said the spec prices could have changed since the grant application was submitted a year ago, which means prices could be higher or lower. But either way, the grant is a good deal for the city.“ISO does not recommend keeping a fire truck that is 10 years old or older and that is the situation we are in,” Thomas said. He added that the city’s match, in time, could be refunded to the general fund from the city’s share of the countywide tobacco tax.The council authorized the city manager to sign the necessary papers to accept the grant award.The council also authorized the city to submit the necessary paperwork for a Transportation Alternative Program (TAP) grant to install sidewalks along the north side of S.A. Graham Boulevard and the west side of Galloway Road, to and from designated points.Thomas said the preliminary survey for the project estimated the cost on Graham Boulevard to be $125,000. No cost estimate was made for the Galloway project.“This is a competitive TAP grant and there is no assurance that we’ll get it,” Thomas said. “But the council has been discussing this project since 2011. It’s a 80-20 match grant based on the cost of the total project, with the city assuming 20 percent of the cost.”Thomas reported that the city is in the process of erecting a 40×100-foot metal building to replace the structure that was destroyed by straight-line winds in 2012.The building was originally a hanger and had been converted to use as inventory space for the city’s utility department. The new building will be dedicated to that same use.The council voted to purchase a John Deere ATV from the local John Deere dealership at a cost of $8,000 and to declare the city’s current ATV surplus, making it available for bid. The ATV is used by the Public Works Department.The council also approved a request from the Southeast Alabama Solid Waste Disposal Authority for a franchise agreement to collect solid waste within the city.In other business, the council approved the Pike Area Transit System’s request for capital assistance for two new vans. The council voted to pay its prorated share of $1,600.Mayor Jimmy Ramage said PATS is a valuable asset to the people of Pike County and the city is proud to contribute.Ramage said that the city’s summer recreation program got off to a good start Monday night with both a girls’ and boys’ team playing at home and a boys’ team on the road.“We’re looking forward to a fun and successful summer recreation program under the direction of the Pike County School System,” Ramage said. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebrationlast_img read more

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Two teens arrested in death of Ohio photographer hit by falling tree branch

first_imgDanHenson1/iStock(LANCASTER, Ohio) — Two teenagers have been arrested in connection with the death of a photographer who was hit by a falling tree branch in an Ohio state park last month.Victoria Schafer, 44, of Chillicothe, Ohio, was taking pictures for several high school seniors at Hocking Hill State Park on Sept. 2 when she was struck and killed by a falling section of a tree. She is survived by her husband and four children.Detectives from the Hocking County Sheriff’s Office assisted the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to investigate Schafer’s death. The investigators found evidence suggesting the falling branch was not a natural occurrence, according to press releases from the Hocking County Sheriff’s Office and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. “We are not out for vengeance,” Schafer’s sister, Cathy Muth, told Columbus ABC affiliate WSYX-TV in an interview last month. “We just want to know what happened, and we want to prevent it from happening again.”Investigators later received information about two teenage boys who might have been involved in Schafer’s death. The pair allegedly confessed during interviews with detectives and were taken into custody Thursday on charges of reckless homicide, according to the sheriff’s office. The teens, ages 16 and 17, are being held at the juvenile detention center in Lancaster, Ohio, while they await court proceedings. Authorities are not releasing their names due to their ages. “I appreciate the public’s valuable contributions to this case and the perseverance and determination of the investigators,” Mary Mertz, director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, said in a statement Thursday. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Growth of microalgae using nitrate-rich brine wash from the water industry

first_imgSafe and accepted limits for nitrates in drinking water are exceeded in around one-third of the groundwater bodies in Europe. Whilst anion exchange (AEX) is an effective technology to strip nitrates, the regeneration of AEX resins using saturated sodium chloride (brine) results in a significant quantity of nitrate-rich saline waste, which is currently disposed of at a substantial cost to the water industry. The aim of this research was to evaluate the viability of using AEX brine wash as a nutrient source to support microalgal growth. Experiments were carried out at laboratory and pilot scales to test which algal species were able to grow on brine wash, to determine the optimal nitrate concentration within modified growth media, and to identify whether the origin of the brine wash affected the nitrate uptake potential. In small scale laboratory experiments, five marine algal species were able to grow in modified f/2 growth media containing nitrate sourced from the brine wash. Further experiments showed that three species could grow on the modified media at nitrate concentrations from 5 to 274 mg L−1. P. tricornutum could remediate up to 6.5 mg nitrate in 50 mL cultures in laboratory scale experiments, up to 570 mg at 10 L scale and 1700 mg at 100 L scale. We found that the origin of the brine wash did not significantly affect the growth of the cultures or the amount of nitrate removal from the modified media. The algal biomass could be used effectively in biogas production in small-scale trials, although with <10% the yield from P. tricornutum biomass from standard f/2 medium. Our results suggest that it may be possible to derive value from brine wash as a sustainable source of nitrate for the growth of microalgae in bulk after optimisation.last_img read more

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Crowds Delight in Labor Day Weekend Kickoff

first_imgErin and Ricky Rodriguez, of Berlin, N.J., enjoy a walk on the beach with their girls, Henley, 2, left, and 4-year-old Haddon on Labor Day weekend. By MADDY VITALEFamilies took to the beaches and Boardwalk on Saturday with one resonating theme, enjoy Labor Day weekend in Ocean City and the last weeks of summer.“This is our first time in Ocean City. We like places with boardwalks and heard good things about it here,” said Hemil Maniar, of central Pennsylvania.He and his wife, Neha Sinha, waited in line to get their daily beach tags.Their big holiday plans, at least for the next few hours, consisted of, above all, one very important thing.“We are going to lay down on the beach. Nothing special, just relax and catch up on some of our books,” Maniar said.Hemil Maniar, of Pennsylvania, and his wife, Neha Sinha, purchase their beach tags from Sarah Booher.Beach tag checker, Sarah Booher was stationed at Sixth Street beach.By noon, Booher said she had already sold 125 beach tags.“It’s been very busy,” she said.Umbrellas and chairs dotted the beaches. Beachgoers nibbled on picnic-style lunches, and others strolled along the Boardwalk and enjoyed pizza, ice cream, shopping and amusements.Lifeguards John Lenoir, Frank Brady and Justin Southard watched intently as vacationers reveled in the refreshing waters.Lifeguard John Lenoir gives a thumbs-up, while fellow lifeguards Frank Brady (red jacket in chair) and Justin Southard watch swimmers.Ocean City was brimming with activity Saturday, as it had throughout what officials have called a blockbuster summer of weather that was as close to perfect as possible.By early afternoon, it seemed many of the holiday travelers were down enjoying all “America’s Greatest Family Resort” has to offer.Erin Rodriguez, of Berlin, N.J., and her husband, Ricky, took their daughters Haddon, 4, and Henley, 2, for a memorable holiday.“We’ve been coming on the weekends all summer. It is great family time. They love the rides and they love the beach,” Erin Rodriguez said of her daughters. “We have a family member with a home on Bay Avenue. It is a great perk for us.”Umbrellas dot the beach on a warm, pleasant start to the holiday weekend.The family walked to the water’s edge. Erin and Ricky held their daughters’ hands as the children giggled as their feet got wet.Then it was time to return to making sandcastles and everyone pitched in to help.Ricky Rodriguez said as he scooped sand into a bucket, “I like the family time.”And when asked, the girls named their specific favorite parts of Ocean City.“I like the seashells,” Haddon said with a big grin.Her little sister loves the beach.“They like the rides, too,” Erin Rodriguez said. “We just really like Ocean City.”Families stroll down the Boardwalk.Some families were so relaxed they almost forgot where they were from.Rosie Mendez, of Mooresville, Pa., laughed when she paused before giving her hometown.“I’m just so relaxed,” she said with a laugh, as she lounged under an umbrella to a good book.Her husband, Joe Mendez, and their son, Chris, 6, were much too busy to daydream.They were involved in making a supreme sandcastle.Joe joked about where the family was from. “Yes, we are from Pennsylvania,” he said with a big smile. “But for today, we are from Ocean City.”To that, their son, Chris, chuckled.Joe Mendez, of Mooresville, Pa., and his son, Chris, 6, make sandcastles.last_img read more

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The In-Store Bakery Award

first_imgIn-store bakeries (ISBs) are perfectly placed to meet today’s consumer demands for freshly made food and retail theatre. This is why the In-store Bakery Award is such an important category at this year’s Baking Industry Awards.An integral part of the supermarket offering, the ISB gives consumers an experience to enjoy when they visit a store, whether through the smell of baking bread, the spectacle of bakers hard at work making the goods or the tasty products shoppers take home with them. For many shoppers, being able to pick up a freshly baked loaf of bread, savoury product or sweet treat is an important reason for visiting a supermarket.The ISB is also a department where retailers can experiment with innovative new lines and limited-edition, seasonal products. This enables them to quickly meet new consumer trends, such as smaller pack sizes, different flavours and healthier products. If your supermarket runs in-store bakeries which make goods for sale, please tell your managers to enter this award. The award is open to all supermarket ISBs.This award invites entries from all ISB managers who can demonstrate a well-tailored product range, good availability and ideas for maximising sales and promoting growth. In addition, judges will be looking for outstanding customer service, good team spirit and excellent management of resources or skills development.ISBs employ a huge number of people and have an important role to play in developing skills in the baking industry. Judges will be keen to hear about staff training and how this has improved the service and product range offered to customers. Perhaps one of your team has helped develop a new product or given a twist to an old favourite, which has boosted sales. If so, we want to hear about it. Equally, ISB teams that go the extra mile to ensure they have exciting bakery displays and excellent availability should also enter.Of course, customer service is one of the most important parts of a successful ISB. Do you listen to customers and use the information to tailor your offering? Perhaps you have been involved in community events or fund-raising.Entrants to last year’s award were commended by judges for ideas such as staggering bread production to offer warm fresh bread throughout the day and developing a range of muffins to meet new consumer demands.—-=== Ian Cain, bakery manager at Tesco, Meltham Lane, in Chesterfield, on winning last year ===”Winning the award cemented what I’ve always known – our team is the best in the business. We’d previously won an award for being the best in-store bakery in Tesco, but to win one for being the best in the UK is something else. It was great recognition for all the hard work that our team puts in every day.”Tesco had a plaque made with everyone’s name on to commemorate the win, which is on the wall in the bakery next to the award itself, a photo from the night and the certificate. Customers are always commenting on the display and it gives them even more confidence in what we do. It all helps build our reputation with customers.”last_img read more

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Understanding shoppers is ‘key to the sugar issue’

first_imgTo keep products on supermarket shelves, suppliers need to understand what shoppers think, according to Bridgethorne.The category and shopper management specialist has told a London conference that a better understanding of shoppers is the key to keeping products on shelves.Patrick Finlay, director of marketing and strategy at the company, was addressing delegates at the Food & Drink Federation’s Staying On Shelf event. The event focused on the decisions by some retailers to delist added-sugar drinks and the implications for British food and drink manufacturers.Finlay said: “Suppliers need to address the sugar issue through a shopper lens, because if we understand what shoppers think and how they behave, it will help inform, firstly, what we should put on the shelf and, importantly, how to keep it there.”Finlay argued that, while we all recognise the importance of sugar in our diet, the answer may not be as simple as removing all sugary products from the shelves. It is a question of balance, he contended. While acknowledging that there is a responsibility to ensure we all eat a balanced and healthy diet, lurching to extremes in the process may not necessarily be the answer either, he said.He cited research from the Bridgethorne Shopper Index, the company’s quarterly survey of shopper opinions, which showed that sugar content in food and drinks is the greatest concern for shoppers, being rated as more serious than fat content, additives, salt content and calories and that this is having an impact on buying behaviour.This concern appears to be driven primarily by health concerns (28.2% cited the fact that sugar caused health problems as their principal concern) and is possibly top of mind due to recent media coverage.Finlay added: “The danger for suppliers and manufacturers is that they hit the panic button now instead of using a more measured, informed and balanced approach.”This comes as the government reportedly abandoned plans to introduce a sugar tax as part of its ‘obesity strategy’, earlier this month.last_img read more

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Elephant Revival & Ben Sollee Honor Hurricane First Responders With New Song In Asheville [Watch]

first_imgThough the song debut was the highlight of the evening, the show itself was full of wonderful moments. After Sollee’s opening set, Elephant Revival took the stage and quickly showed the elements of their sound that have won them an amazingly dedicated fan base. Their mixture of emotional power and lilting musical restraint is as unique as it is moving. It is not uncommon to hear the entire audience singing along in hushed tones, as the band winds their way through a catalog of intricate and hauntingly beautiful material.Their newest album, Petals, features a more somber and mature vision of their sound, and alongside their sunnier earlier work, showcase a dynamic range that entrances audiences completely. They can strip down their sound for stunning a cappella pieces, such as the riveting “I Won’t Die Lonely”……before involving the crowd in a rhapsodical sing-a-long version of their classic “Sing To The Mountains.”Multi-instrumentalist Bonnie Paine has recently begun sharing her long gestating cello skills in addition to her washboard, percussion and vocal duties, to startling effect. Check out her work on the instrumental “Flight Patterns Weather,” below:The rest of the band was on point as well. Banjoist and pedal steel guitarist Charlie Rose adds a strong string presence to the ensemble, while bassist Dango Rose‘s tone manages to be punchy and dark at the same time.Guitarist and vocalist Daniel Rodriguez was a mixture of smiles and eyes shut emotion as he sang his songs of motion and love while fiddler Bridget Law‘s magnificent violin work soared and dove through the arrangements like a bird in flight.As is the band’s tradition whenever possible the opening act, Solleee was invited back out for a riotous closing number. The tune chosen for the night’s fun, “Grace Of A Woman,” an ode to the power women have to nurture us all, was clearly enjoyable for not just the audience but the musicians as well. Watch the fun below:Though the audience was sad to see the end, the delighted cheers and smiles on their faces told the tale of their experience as well as any words ever could. Load remaining images Elephant Revival, along with their special guest Ben Sollee, brought an uplifting show of positive music and much needed distraction to residents and Hurricane refugees at Asheville, North Carolina’s New Mountain Amphitheater last Friday. Coastal residents flocked inland to escape the massive winds and rains pounding the shoreline and were grateful to find an outlet for their nervous energy on the dance floor. While attendees knew that they were in for a treat, they didn’t know that the bands were working up a special tune to share with them and the world.Watching footage of the brave men and women responding to the crisis along the coast inspired cellist Sollee into action. Putting pen to paper and bow to string, he composed the tune “Cajun Navy,” inspired by footage of relief workers evacuating and defending the lives and homes of those most affected. Releasing the song on his Bandcamp page earlier in the day, Sollee pledged that he would donate all proceeds from the first week’s sales of the song to Oxfam America, an organization long known for its work aiding the poor and protecting our shoreline.Unfortunately, there was a bit of a problem. The song was so new that the bands hadn’t yet had a chance to practice it together. The weather had delayed arrival long enough to negate any opportunities to workshop the tune. The only remaining option, to try and whip up an acceptable collaboration in-between sets, seemed impossible with fans lining up to meet Sollee at the merch table to buy copies of his forthcoming release.Luckily for everyone involved, a fan overheard the lament being shared by the artists and volunteered to man the booth for Sollee, allowing the artist to quickly rehearse with his hosts, who were eager to help with such a good cause. After what has to be a record setting song learning experience, the cellist sprinted out to the line of eager fans who had purchased his new disc and were waiting patiently for him to arrive. Having explained the reason for Sollee’s late appearance for his signing, his supporters were more than happy to wait for his arrival.Here’s “Cajun Navy,” a loose and spirited affair that showcases not only the talents of both bands but the sincere joy they have making music for the world.last_img read more

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